JOURNAL OF (FIFTH) LIEUTENANT JOHN B. DALE, 1844‑46,

IN NEW ENGLAND HISTORICAL GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY


 

 

29 May 1844  1130 Sailed from New York ‑‑ Henry A. Wise, Minister to Brazil, is embarked with wife, 4 children (1 a babe of 8 months), and servants ‑‑ xchanged cheers with COLUMBUS (74), just returning from 3 years overseas.

 

30 May 1844  "...the anchors...hoisted upon the gunwale, the chain cables unbent and paid below..." ‑‑ 450 in crew ‑‑ bound for Fayal.

 

 1 Jun 1844  Rigging strung with pea jackets and woolen clothing drying aloft after 2 days of rain ‑‑ a band embarked ‑‑ Baby Wise cut 1st tooth.

 

 2 Jun 1844  [Sunday]  Church bell at 1000 ‑‑ awnings spread in light airs ‑‑ abaft the gangway aweather were the Warrants, then Midshipmen, Wardroom officers, and ladies and passengers, in that order aft ‑‑ alee, the crew: in white frocks and blacked shoes ‑‑ First Lieutenant read service – Captain read the Articles of War, then the Purser called general muster, each man passing around the capstan as he answered for inspection ‑‑ "Woebetide him with long hair or unshaven chin!"

 

 5 Jun 1844  Exercising the men every day at the "Great Guns" ‑‑ gun crews divided into 3 divisions on the gun deck and 2 on the spar deck, a Lieutenant and 1‑2 Midshipmen per division ‑‑ "Four 68 pounders, Paixhans for throwing loaded shells..." ‑‑ "The only thing about the ship which belonged to the original Constitution, is her battery, which is the same except for the Paixhans substituted for the four midship guns on the main deck; so that her armament now consists of 26 long 24's, 4 8" Paixhans on the Gun deck, and on the spar deck 20 32 lb. carronades ‑ there having been before this  cruise two more long guns on the forecastle.  One of the guns on the quarterdeck has a groove in its side reamed out by a British ball during the last war,  illed, it is said, a man at the wheel.  By the way the binnacles in present use onboard were captured in the Java."

 

 7 Jun 1844  Making 10 knots under all studdingsails ‑‑ Captain impatient about length of voyage ‑‑ using new India‑rubber rain clothing (officers) ‑‑ men have oiled or blacked canvas overalls ‑‑ hatches closed with tarpaulins ‑‑ officers walk and read on gun deck ‑‑ smoking permitted near galley, where one roasts, or forward toward the bridle ports, amongst the ducks, chickens, and pigs.

 

 9 Jun 1844  Log line shows 14 knots, "...which is rather faster than I recollect ever to have sailed before..."

 

12 Jun 1844  Flying fish also called "fish bird" ‑‑ passing Flores ‑‑ winds have calmed.

 

17 Jun 1844  Arrived at Fayal the previous evening ‑‑ anchored in 25 fathoms with 75 fathoms chain ‑‑ bumboats abound, with fresh fruits, eggs, bread, and potatoes.

 

20 Jun 1844  Sailed for Madeira.

 

21 Jun 1844  Making 10 knots.

 

22 Jun 1844  "...raining cats and dogs..." ‑‑ "...blowing marlingspikes [sic]..."

 

23 Jun 1844  Rounded western end of Madeira and entered Funchal.

 

29 Jun 1844  1500 Sailed ‑‑ a cornet at the fore and a gun fired constituted the recall signal.

 

 1 Jul 1844  Arrived at Santa Cruz, Tenerife; anchored in 29 fathoms with 58 fathoms of chain.

 

 6 Jul 1844  Sailed for Rio ‑‑ French corvette BERCEAU sailed at same time for same port, and for several days the two ships sailed in proximity of one another.

 

22 Jul 1844  "Man overboard!" ‑‑ life buoy with red flag cut away ‑‑ quarter boat lowered ‑‑ man had been scraping outer hull ‑‑ saved.

 

23 Jul 1844  2000 "Light ho!" ‑‑ boarded by Father Neptune from bowsprit area: "...his messenger...when, instead of being a stalwart Triton, covered with sea weed and dripping with brine, a little Forecastleman by the name of Fitzgerald was rig'd out more like a North American Indian than a Sea‑God. Indeed, it was a laughable burlesque, for our little Forecastleman with his wiry legs developed [sic] beneath his white sheeting wrapper, which he drew around him in a Tragedy style, and with a paper cap on his head, had  lost his presence of mind and forgotten his part.  However he managed to deliver a letter to the officer of the deck from Neptune to Capt. Percival an old acquaintance welcoming him back once more to his dominions, requesting the names of such of his children as had never been initiated, and also permission  to come onboard to‑morrow morning.  This was graciously accorded by the Capt. with an appropriate speech, when Old Neptune was again heard hailing for his 'Postman.'  They both then disappeared over the bows and were supposed off in a half barrel of tarred rope‑yarns in a flame, which slowly floated astern and continued to burn for  a mile or two."

 

24 Jul 1844  0900  "Old Neptune soon after hailed us and was seen coming aft in the weather gangway in a triumphal car (a map chest mounted on trucks) drawn by four sea‑horses (four negroes painted with red streaks across their faces and naked from the waist upwards) with Amphitrite seated by his side and one or two boys dressed very queerly but whether they were to represent male or female gods was very doubtful, accompanied by Tritons and Constables with long spears and oakum beards.  The barbers too performed their part in the strange procession flourishing their razors made of  hoop‑iron a foot or two in length.  Father Neptune was personified by Kemp and old broken down boatswain now a quartergunner, and when he arrived on the quarter‑deck he made, thro' his speaking trumpet a very complimentary speech to the Captain and Old Ironsides with permission to initiate those of his children who had never before crossed the line.  After a good deal of mummery of that sort, and some private cursing of Neptune sotto voce to his black sea‑horses when they came near capsizing his Majesty in turning.  The whole party took a glass of grog and returned to the Forecastle.  Then was a platform raised and the starboard gangway occupied by a large tarpaulin triced up so as to hold water.  The hose of the forcing pump was led into it, and the Carpenters set to in pumping.  A band of oakum bearded constables came aft with a list of names and first pounced upon the Lieutenant of Marines who walked off with them most manfully.  Soon he was seen, striped [sic] of his coat, seated on the platform with his back to the tarpaulin reservoir of water, with the grotesque barbers flourishing in the air their huge razors and lather‑brushes: many of them wore masks of canvas with painted faces producing a hideous effect; and there sat old Neptune in state, with his white flowing beard, red‑robed, paper crown, and in place of his trident, a dolphin on a staff.  Screams of laughter echoed from every body as they proceeded with different  individuals, excusing none but females, the sick, and Mr. Wise, who got off by making a stump speech (on the Jacob's ladder!) in which he claimed, as an Ambassador, privilege of free transit thro' neutral territories agreeable to the laws of Nations, offering at the same time to substitute all his children, his Secretary and his servants for the ordeal, adding some spirited promises which probably was the most favorable argument he could have used. "Fast as the neophytes were lathered with soap suds and coal‑dust, shaved by these rough barbers with their rasping razors, with edges like sand, they were capized [sic] over backwards into the water where they were received by four Tritons ‑ the biggest, blackest, half‑naked, wooly‑headed Tritons – who soused them under, washed them over, and held them for the engine hose to play on, till they made their escape, half dead and half drowned by such rude handling.

                      "Many were refractory and ran aloft where they were caught by the manhunting constables and lowered down by a bowline, only to get rougher treatment than the others.  No place was sacred for a party came down to the Purser's room where he was engaged writing: he was obliged to out by  his ledgers and go through the ordeal.  The reefers were shaved and soused in the most unconscionable manner.  One of Mr. Wise's boys was very refractory, but a drummer‑boy taking him by the head and shoulders, while another boy, both rigged out like imps, took him by the heels, and lugged him up to the dreaded platform.  The spirit of fun was now rife.  Shouts of laughter resounded from all parts of the ship.  Little bye plays were going  on, very ludicrous in them selves and especially on an occasion when every‑body was disposed to laugh.

                      "After two hours frolic the boatswain piped belay.  However it closed by a scene not soon forgotten.  The Capt. among others had mounted upon the boats amidships to see the fun, when some of the midshipmen got hold of the hose, pointing at some particular person: in the melee which occurred our veteran Captain received a full charge from the force pump and there was such a scramble to get off the boats that some came off coatless or tail‑less, and all looking like drowned rats.  The Capt. laughed as heartily as any of them, with his yellow nankens clinging close to his legs, and the grey‑head drenched with water."

 

 1 Aug 1844  Sighted Cape Frio ‑‑ sighted a ship in the distance flying the French flag ‑‑  it's BERCEAU ‑‑ CONSTITUTION outsails her on all points except "in light airs right dead before the wind" ‑‑  "Very rare for two ships to sail at the same time for so many thousand miles separate, and then come together anchoring within minutes of each other" ‑‑ American frigates RARITAN and CONGRESS, as well as English, French, Genoese,  Brazilian, and Portuguese men‑of‑war are present ‑‑ Mr. Wise and family disembarked.

 

 8 Sep 1844  Sailed ‑‑ heavy head sea ‑‑ 8 months provisions on board ‑‑ draft: 21'4"  fwd, 23'2" aft ‑‑ "The old ship has been painted lead‑color, as well for the better preservation of the wood, as for its greater radiating properties than black in view of an African climate: the ribband usually white is now painted red, somewhat to the wonderment of the Brazilians, who think we have put on war‑paint.  Mr. Chandler has been replaced by Dr. [J. C.]   Reinhart as botanist.  Passed Midshipman I. G. Strain is Master.  Mr. [Gough] Grant now Acting Lieutenant."

 

 9 Sep 1844  A heavy sea "washed the gun deck quite freely..."

 

17 Sep 1844  Caught an albatross by floating a baited hook astern ‑‑ let him go but "not until one of the sailors had by stealth cruelly cut off one of his feet to make sure of  the skin for a purse!  It is to be hoped that the spirit of this unhappy albatross may not plague us as happened to the 'Ancient Mariner'..."

 

18 Sep 1844  The weather beginning to grow cool in southern latitudes.

 

19 Sep 1844  Exercised at general quarters (a once‑weekly routine) ‑‑ "An empty cask was taken off in a boat and then the guns trained upon them [sic] and discharged for practice.  All the shots were good and some clearly proved that the old ship's Barkers had not forgotten their days of glory."

 

20 Sep 1844  A gale from the NNW ‑‑ flooded gun deck ‑‑ occasional spray over the spar deck ‑‑ rolling considerably, but not being pooped; rides up gracefully as an albatross..."

 

22 Sep 1844  Gale abating.

 

23 Sep 1844  Making 10 knots ‑‑ made Tristan da Cunha in the forenoon ‑‑ Mr. [Amasa] Paine is First Lieutenant.

 

24 Sep 1844  Another "blow" ‑‑ heavy pouring rain ‑‑ cleared in evening.

 

25 Sep 1844  Filled away from Tristan da Cunha for the Cape of Good Hope ‑‑ "While before the wind the Frigate rolled tremendously, rolling the muzzles of her spar‑deck carronades, sometimes into the water: but always very  easy and nothing of the jerking motion peculiar to many of our ships."

 

27 Sep 1844  Delightful weather again.

 

 4 Oct 1844  Squally with "hay‑cock waves that tumbled us about..." ‑‑  crossjack carried away at 0000 ‑‑ the sea, from astern, "would now and then force its way through the rudder‑coat, flooding the pantry of the Wardroom, the cascading, slushing noise of which added to that of divers[e] chairs, boxes, & materials adrift, the rattling of the wheel‑ropes, and the agonizing scream of an ungreased leading block, rendered our apartments conducive to anything but sleep..." ‑‑ gale abating at noon ‑‑ on the edge of Agulhas Bank, doubling the Cape of Good Hope.

 

 6 Oct 1844  [Sunday]  "...fairly in the Indian Ocean.  The first time her waters were ever cut by the keel of Old ironsides!" ‑‑ a new crossjack fitted.

 

 7 Oct 1844  Making 10 knots ‑‑ squally; heavy sea.

 

 8 Oct 1844  Moderating.

 

10 Oct 1844  On a direct course from Cape Bank to the S end of  Madagascar.

 

14 Oct 1844  Off St. Augustine's Bay, Madagascar.

 

15 Oct 1844  Anchored off the Bay.

 

16 Oct 1844  Anchored inside the Bay in 20 fathoms with 40 fathoms each to 2 anchors getting wood, water, and bullocks ($8 each) and sheep ($1 each) – no vegetables available beyond 1 basket of lima beans ‑‑ "...launch and first cutter..." ‑‑ natives aboard, male and female, "in the most primitive state of  nudity" ‑‑ dressed mutton for Wardroom hanging "up forward."

 

17 Oct 1844  "...the women with but little more covering [ "a strip of cloth around the middle"], their figures shining in voluptuous and greasy contour..."

 

20 Oct 1844  Sailed ‑‑ spoke HM brig SAPPHO, anti‑slaver.

 

21 Oct 1844  In Mozambique Channel.

 

23 Oct 1844  Passing between "Pracilla Bank and Juan de Nova Island..."

 

25 Oct 1844  Arrived at Mozambique at dark.

 

26 Oct 1844  Shifted berth by kedging "more in between the islands of St. George and St. Iago..." ‑‑ "...no American trade here except an occasional whaler stopping in for refreshments and one annual ship from Salem, Mass. to a respectable Portuguese merchant..."  ‑‑ took on fowls, ducks, cocoanuts [sic], eggs, and a few fruits and vegetables.

 

27 Oct 1844  1300 Sailed to NE ‑‑ currents in the channel going both N and S.

 

30 Oct 1844  Sighted a water spout.

 

31 Oct 1844  Anchored in 8 fathoms with a kedge with "Matinuka Pt." bearing S, 8‑10 miles.

 

 1 Nov 1844  Arrived "Majumba," Bembetooka Bay, Madagascar ‑‑ anchored in 6 3/4 fathoms.

 

 3 Nov 1844  Received "buffalo cattle" and water, chickens, ducks, geese, and cocoanuts [sic] ‑‑ "Begging is unknown at Majunga, and the heavy penalties for stealing prevents the latter crime.  On a sand‑spit, at this moment a human head, stuck on a pole, serves as a fearful warning to all thieves.  Their sanguinary laws punish theft by death; higher crimes are punished by the faggot.  My informant had seen many speared on this sand‑spit, their heads struck off and elevated on poles; had heard the last shriek of many a poor wretch as the fierce flames curled around him." ‑‑ the men of the watering party got drunk on "arrack."

 

 5 Nov 1844  Sailed ‑‑ "The Brig was cleared today and all those who behaved badly ashore were served out with divers[e] dozens for their misconduct.  At sea, sailors are the most obedient, respectable, and apparently happy of all laboring classes; their good conduct has inspired confidence, their uniform deportment the respect of their officers.  But is it a sad truth that no sooner do they come within the sphere of spiritous liquors, then all their good resolutions give way before the besotting demon of strong drink.  And in a Frigate crew there are always enough who are sure to make themselves far worse than brutes.  Sailors are improving in this respect, but it is very, very slowly.  With officers it has gone out of fashion: midshipmen do not now fee their hammock‑boys with grog ‑ men do not expect now an extra glass for any little personal service they may render an officer ‑ even the government has reduced the allowance of daily whiskey one half ‑ the temperance societies have frequently a large number pledged to abstain for  the cruise ‑ and men are encouraged by the officers to draw money in lieu of grog.  Yet with all this temptation ashore is too strong for poor Jack, I  am  not clear on the utility of abolishing the spirit ration in the Navy. Sailors have but few sources of happiness: and one is the enjoyment of their meals seasoned by the smell and regular allowance of whiskey now served out onboard men of war."

 

 7 Nov 1844  Anchored with kedge in 12 fathoms near Nos Bey Island at the mouth of Passandana Bay, NW Madagascar ‑‑ later shifted closer to town.

 

 8 Nov 1844  Commenced watering.

 

12 Nov 1844  Sailed.

 

17 Nov 1844  Anchored off N end of Zanzibar Island.

 

18 Nov 1844  In morning, arrived off Metony, Zanzibar ‑‑ anchored a little before sunset off Imam's palace ‑‑ BERCEAU present.

 

19 Nov 1844  Captain Percival indisposed.

 

20 Nov 1844  BERCEAU surveying harbor ‑‑ Lieutenant Dale visits her: "Among other improvements observed the still by which a sufficiency of sea water is every day converted into fresh for the use of every man onboard, and this too by the same fire with which the cooking is done ‑ a great improvement & which demanded our serious attention...  The anchor chain taken around the capstan ‑ now universally adopted in French Navy." – “I found an artist...[who]... showed us many pictures made in the Berceau, wherein the Constitution figures prominently: two in which French vanity has seized upon the point of view very flattering to themselves.  One is a view at Teneriffe, when we got underway together ‑ the Constitution a long  way ahead of the Berceau; the other at the entrance to Rio, where the Berceau is ahead under reduced sail waiting for the Constitution to come up.  To be complete the series a third one should be interpolated, representing the night before our entrance to Rio, when the Constitution was hove‑to with main topsail aback, and the Berceau passing, under all sail!"

 

23 Nov 1844  Captain Percival now recovered.

 

25 Dec 1844  50‑60 on sick list ‑‑ temperature 80‑85 day and night, seemingly endlessly  ‑‑ shoulder of pork, ducks, and preserved soup for Christmas dinner – wine was "passed by as so much poison" ‑‑ 2 have recently died; both over 50 ‑‑ 1 was a German musician whose son also was aboard ‑‑ "For the first time this cruise, now near seven months, 'all hands' were summoned 'to bury the dead.'  The deceased after being decently laid out in his  grave clothes, was sewed up in a hammock with a few heavy shot at his feet, and placed in the gangway beneath the American Union.  The service said, the body was slid into the deep by his old shipmates, who coiled down the ropes immediately after as if nothing had happened out of the ordinary line of ship's duty.  Not so with old Fisher, the bandsman ‑ there was one young heart filled with grief; the son will return sorrowing to the poor old Mother and tell her the Father was buried far from home in the Indian Ocean."

 

 1 Jan 1845  Sighted "Summatra" ‑‑ anchored at night.

 

 2 Jan 1845  Enroute to "Quallah Battoo, or Soosoo" ‑‑ a crewman aboard speaks Malay - took 2 natives as pilots.

 

 3 Jan 1845  Winds off Sumatra refreshing after so much heat ‑‑ arrived at Quallah Battoo ‑‑ and American ship present taking on pepper ‑‑ visited scene of  FRIENDSHIP and POTOMAC's retaliation ‑‑ natives cautiously respectful ‑‑ Po Adam aboard.

 

 4 Jan 1845  "Rajah Chedulah and his suite of dirty cotton rag'd rascals came onboard ‑ Cpt. P. being laid up by the gout rec'd. them all in his cabin where he held a talk ‑ assuring them of our peaceful intentions so long as they  behaved themselves, and of our speedy vengeance for any treachery to our trading ships." ‑‑ "And a precious set of scoundrels are they all.  But I cannot perceive that American intercourse is likely to benefit them much.  A Malay  and Yankee are pretty well matched at bargain‑making."

 

 5 Jan 1845  Received a water buffalo weighing about 700 lbs for $45.

 

 6 Jan 1845  Sailed at 1600 ‑‑ Midshipman Mason of Virginia died in the forenoon after several days' illness (dysentery and fever) ‑‑ "This evening the remains were followed by his saddened messmates and the officers, with mournful music, from the quarterdeck to the gangway, where the service was said, the union and his uniform removed and the body committed to the deep followed by two vollies [sic] of musketry from the Marine guard, the military honors due his rank."

 

 7 Jan 1845  2130 Anchored off Annalaboo with kedge in 16 1/2 fathoms.

 

 8 Jan 1845  0400 Sailed to the river Wylah ‑‑ 2000 sailed after checking with 2 American merchantmen ‑‑ Po Adam left ship.

 

 9 Jan 1845  7 miles off Pulo Cass at sunset, "a small island which looks like a spoon with a short handle bottom up, when viewed from the Nd."

 

10 Jan 1845  "...now in entrance to the Straits of Malacca, beating around Achen Head..." ‑‑ sighted Nicobar Island.

 

15 Jan 1845  "...up to Diamond Pt..." ‑‑ 50 sick.

 

20 Jan 1845  "...after a tedious beat of ten days we have at length weathered Pulo Pera..."

 

21 Jan 1845  Passed Pulo Penang.

 

28 Jan 1845  Sighted Malacca Light and town after another tedious week ‑‑ 50 sick (mostly dysentery) ‑‑ many snakes in the water.

 

29 Jan 1845  "...here [at Malacca] for the first time we met with those enterprising Yankees of the East, the Chinese" (sent a boat to the town hoping to get something for the sick) ‑‑ an old seaman named Wolfe died at night of dysentery.

 

31 Jan 1845  Sighted Singapore Island in the distance.

 

 1 Feb 1845  Still 10 miles short of Singapore.

 

 3 Feb 1845  Anchored 2‑3 miles from Singapore Town ‑‑ sighted flag of an English Commodore ‑‑ Captain still laid up in cabin.

 

 7 Feb 1845  Chinese New Year's Day: fire crackers and drums ‑‑ feasting, drinking, gambling, opium smoking ‑‑ shops closed ‑‑ "During our stay...our intercourse was...of the most friendly character with the officers of H.B.M. Frigate Cambrian and Brig Wolverine.  The Commodore Chads met with an old acquaintance in the Constitution, he having been a Lieut. of the Java, who was under the disagreeable necessity of resigning his sword to the Yankee captors during the last war.  This circumstance however, nor the accidental proximity of a large Indiaman  by the name of Java, produced not the slightest hindrance to the harmony of our social intercourse."  ‑‑ "...cooped up with some 500 souls..." ‑‑ completely replenished the ship…’

 

10 Mar 1845  1600 Sailed for the China Sea.

 

17 Mar 1845  At port bower anchor off the coast of Borneo, near the port of Sambas ‑‑ Captain Percival continues "on the list" – navigation difficult; monsoon winds contrary; charts inaccurate.

 

18 Mar 1845  Sailed northward, then returned to previous anchorage ‑‑ in a way, lost.

 

19 Mar 1845  Second Lieutenant Chaplin; Midshipman Terrett mentioned.

 

21 Mar 1845  Up‑river expeditions to Pumenkat [Primankat?] and Sambas ‑‑ "...our Chinese servant..."

 

22 Mar 1845  Sailed northward in morning ‑‑ anchored inshore at nightfall in 14‑15 fathoms.

 

23 Mar 1845  [Sunday]  Sailed passed St. Pierre Island and “the Haycock" ‑‑ anchored at night in 20 fathoms.

 

24 Mar 1845  Sailed again, slowly against the NE monsoon.

 

26 Mar 1845  Weathered Flat Island in the afternoon.

 

29 Mar 1845  "...we have been slowly edging to the East..." ‑‑ SE wind now "sending us merrily on our course" ‑‑ failed after a few hours.

 

 3 Apr 1845  "...our entire ignorance of this part of Borneo has compelled us to anchor for the last three nights..." ‑‑ heavy rains at night.

 

 5 Apr 1845  Mr. Paine ‑‑ chart has 20 NM error ‑‑ caution in laying to had precluded a disastrous grounding the night before ‑‑ "I may as well remark here, that of all ships in the Navy, the Frigate Constitution is the last one which should have been sent in her old age on so perilous a voyage as this..."

 

 6 Apr 1845  Anchored in the "bay of Borneo proper..."  [Tanjong Barram?].

 

 7 Apr 1845  "...moved up to the River..."

 

 8 Apr 1845  "gig, first, & third cutters..." ‑‑ "...the city of Borneo, properly Brunei..." ‑‑ "...as to the object of our mission, to form some commercial treaty with the principal people of this vast Island, and especially here in relation to effecting a right to obtain coal, which is said to abound in this vicinity, we found ourselves completely headed off by the English..."

 

10 Apr 1845  Sailed from Brunei, and hove to off Labuan Island while Doctor Rheinhart, the naturalist, went ashore to search for coal ‑ unsuccessfully – headed N, but got into foul water ‑‑ reversed course.

 

12 Apr 1845  "At 5 in the morning the old ship made a narrow escape from scraping her keel upon the coral rocks..." ‑‑ Labuan in sight about 14 miles S b E –  lost a kedge ‑‑ after more searching for leads to the open sea, anchored in 25 fathoms.

 

15 Apr 1845  2 more days of struggle passed ‑‑ passed Borneo Roads again on the afternoon of the 14th ‑‑ about sunset, anchored when water suddenly  shoaled again ‑‑ in veering hawser, got about 5 fathoms and the larboard bower was erroneously dropped ‑‑ boats found less water everywhere but astern –  in kedging out astern, ship grounded briefly and lightly ‑‑ broke a second kedge.

 

16 Apr 1845  In a "...perfect horseshoe of coral rocks..." ‑‑ working out of reefs ‑‑ anchored at night in 17 fathoms ‑‑ may have found a channel.

 

17 Apr 1845  Made a few miles in light winds ‑‑ anchored.

 

21 Apr 1845  After 11 days of struggle, there is hope of getting clear, but there was a near miss at 1400: Luconia Shoal.

 

23 Apr 1845  Finally able to sail N.

 

25 Apr 1845  "Encouraging!" ‑‑ made some 90 miles yesterday.

 

26 Apr 1845  "We were astonished last evening at 11 by a severe squall which made the old ship reel before the sail could be taken off.  We had scarcely gone to sleep after this interruption before the cry of 'man overboard!' ‑ 'cut away the life buoy!' started every body to their feet.  It seems a poor fellow (John Thompson 2d) was furling the foretopgallant sail from whence he fell in some way, striking the belly of the foretopsail and thence overboard. The ship was instantly hove to, and a boat lowered.  The buoy was found but the unfortunate sailor was nowhere to be seen."

 

 2 May 1845  In the morning, sighted the mountains of Cochin China in the distance.

 

 7 May 1845  Anchored with kedge In 29 fathoms off the Cochin shore just S of "Turon Bay."

 

 8 May 1845  Contrary winds: couldn't make bay ‑‑ anchored 4‑5 miles offshore in 16 fathoms with larboard bower anchor ‑‑ stormy day.

 

 9 May 1845  Prevailing wind and current "coming along down the coast from the Bay of Tonquin" ‑‑ stood offshore, then, with dying wind, barely returned to former anchorage.

 

10 May 1845  "Got into the mouth of the Bay" ‑‑ Cooke, a musician, died after a long illness.

 

11 May 1845  Cooke buried ashore "at the base of the lofty promontory which forms the south western side of the Bay.  The cochin people...permitted the grave to be made in one of their own burial places ‑ for the consideration of $2 with a promise to look out for it!" ‑‑ shifted berth farther inside the bay.

 

13 May 1845  "...one of our Chinese servants..." ‑‑ "In the evening all hands onshore bathed on the nice sand beach before going off to the ship."

 

14 May 1845  CONSTITUTION visited by local Cochin authorities ‑‑ "It seems that a letter was received, thro' one of the persons who visited us, from a certain French Missionary, a Bishop, who stated that he was 'surprised at not having heard from his former letter, that his village had been delivered over to pillage, and that he with 12 Cochin Chinese, were then arrested and under sentence of immediate death!' ‑ Here was an opportunity of a rescue from this semi‑barbarous nation.  It was enough for us to know that a fellow Christian was in danger of his life.  The strongest and most instant measures must be taken.  Humanity was to be our warrant rather than the laws of nations.  The Capt. accompanied by a guard of marines, several boats and officers, all armed to the teeth, immediately proceeded to the shore.  The market place was crowded as usual and the same double line of soldiers stood to their spears.  We marched up, accompanied by the marines, and a part of the crew who were stationed along as we went, each armed with cutlass & pistol, to pass any signal we might make to bring up the whole body.

                            "At the Town House, or Ship Chandlery (for its character is still very doubtful) we took our seats on each side of  the Table in oriental dignity.  Presently the same person who called himself the chief made his appearance at the gate accompanied by his Umbrella bearer etc.  The parley commenced with a desire to see the Chief Mandarin of the place:to this the present person contested that he was the Chief mandarin of the place. After considerable time spent in disputing this point, for he was vidently nothing more than a commercial agent of the King ‑ indeed afterwards acknowledging there was another higher Mandarin, the Capt. demanded that a letter to the French Bishop, which he gave him, should be instantly dispatched, and an answer brought in 24 hours, or he would take possession of their forts and shipping; also that he should take the three principal personages present onboard the Constitution as hostages for the fulfilment [sic] of his demand.  The latter was certainly a bold measure, considering  the number of soldiers under arms and the cannon of the fort were trained upon us enfilading the causeway, and that a fellow stood by the big gong with uplifted hammer ready to sound the tocsin!

                           "But the tocsin did not sound ‑ the cannon did not fire and we walked off with the three head men.  They were so carried away by the confusion of the moment, that I do not believe they were conscious of their situation, or indeed of anything but a feeling of submission to the energy of the'outer barbarians,' until their arrival at the boats.  The soldiers and people looked on with indifference of stoics.  It reminded me of an anecdote related by one of the Eng. officers at Singapore who had been in China during the late war.  He said when they were invading the country the Chinese husbandmen rested on their hoes for a moment, looked at the English forces, and then quietly proceeded with their work!  Two persons who seemed to be attendant pipe‑bearers to the great men were invited to attend their masters, which they accepted, altho' one of them got quite sick onboard and went ashore in the morning."

 

15 May 1845  "Thursday.  We are in a state of high excitement; the watering ship has ceased and no communication allowed with the shore.  It should be observed that we are now at anchor directly under the guns of the circular fort within 1/2 a mile; but whose cannon are all masked under thatched houses.  This morning at quarters we trained our guns this hostages fort; and when our prisoners beheld the warlike preparations, they were filled  with terror, and beg'd the Capt. not to fire, for the Frenchman would certainly be forthcoming!

                          "Having observed three men of war junks this morning at anchor near the three large ships it was deemed advisable to take possession of them, lest they should get underway in the night and give us the slip.  There was no fear of the larger vessels as they were entirely dismantled and housed over with thatch.  Accordingly we left in the three largest boats of the ship, armed to the muzzle, with six marines in each boat and the Marine Officer, Mr. Curtis who volunteered with me in the first Cutter. Lieut. Alden in the Launch aided and abetted by Mr. Strain, the Master, had command of the attack; Lieut. Grant in the 2nd Cutter.  Not knowing what reception we should receive, having observed some thirty persons onboard each junk in the morning armed with spears etc.  our valor was screwed up to the highest notch.  The three doomed vessels lay moored near each other, secured with divers[e] anchors, cables, and hawsers.  After a pull, which seemed to us very short, of a bout a mile and a  half,  each of us dashed alongside our respective vessels, as the newspapers would say, 'in the most gallant style.'  But alas, for our valor!  The wretched, half‑naked, throng made no more resistance than a flock of sheep.  My prize contained six muskets with 'Tower' on the locks, (one of which only received us with fixed bayonet!,) several cutlasses and knives, together with the tall spears with pendants flying which seemed to be a sign of  royalty: not omitting to mention two guns on carriages with wads etc. ready for action and two on swivels, each with a chinese [sic] inscription  pasted on the breeches, doubtless inciting the celestials to such deeds of valor as they did ‑ not exhibit on this occasion.

                            "Having taken possession of the arms and put them, as well as my before‑mentioned flock of sheep, under charge of the marines, my next object as to heave up the anchors and get off, as we were under the guns of the fort, to say nothing of those which might be trained upon us from a ship just to leeward.  One of the cables leading inshore we buoyed with a huge bamboo and slip's, hauled up by the other and set the foresail, that is, unrolled the latteen [sic] mat; then finding we had a breeze I directed the Captives to set the mainsail, instead of doing which they ran for their  spears, and it required divers[e] warlike flourishes of the cutlass before  the Captain (who was inclined to be a little sulky at first) could be induced to unroll the heavy mat.  On this occasion Mr. Curtis distinguished himself in the Oriental custom of bambooing the natives into proper submission. Sail was made, at last, and the first cutter took us in tow; but the junk came to a stand ‑ she would not budge an inch, except to fall off towards the  large ship.  Here was a predicament!  We were afoul of something, but could not find out where, or of what.  In the mean time the other two prizes  had been towed off without difficulty; and we saw a large body of red‑coated soldiers coming to the rescue.  The third cutter coming from the ship to assist in towing us off, got alongside very opportunely, as I was enabled to get under the junk's quarter and ascertain that she was held by a cable under her rudder.  The bark hawser was severed by a sharp cutlass with the greater celerity that we saw the aforesaid soldiers crowding off  towards us.  However when  we got adrift they all went onboard the larger ships and we stood off for the Constitution, under a full press of canvas,  or rather, full press of matting:  I should mention that when Mr. Alden and Grant saw the soldiers coming off, they left their prizes to come to my  assistance, but that we were clear by that time.  We came to off the quarters of the Constitution, the Chinese, reducing sail in the most approved  manner, by rolling up the matting on the boom in a very snug style; when we let go the anchor there was some question among the new  forecastlemen, I had placed there, whether it would sink, as it was wood and the cable of  hemp.

                           "As a true chronicler of this eventful day I should mention that the American flag, which had been transferred from the first cutter to the masthead of the junk, was ordered to be hauled down as we came in hail, thereby intimating that she was not to be considered a prize, but as a hostage like  the Chinese Mandarins already onboard; also, that when our capture was made, one of the chinamen [sic] jumped overboard from fright or intent to escape, and was only brought back by the ferocious gesticulations of one of the most ebony main‑topmen I recollect ever to have seen, who abused the poor China‑man for a 'black rascal'!

                          "During the night one of the junks got underway but was soon brought to again, and the Capt. of each was brought onboard ship for safe keeping."

 

16 May 1845  "Friday.  Nothing especially exciting has occurred today as we are awaiting an answer from the French Bishop or the Cochin King...  The weather is excessively warm.  All work has ceased onboard except painting ship."

 

17 May 1845  "Very hot and still... Our letters have mystified: and I believe, those sent to the King, were returned to Turon, as they were not in the right tone to please his Majesty. It is certain that nothing satisfactory can be learned about the French Priest."

 

18 May 1845  Nothing happened.

 

19 May 1845  [Monday]  "Another day of excitement but ended pretty much in smoke.  Having previously sounded out a nearer approach to the Town, this morning we hauled in, and got out kedges so as to present a broadside to the fortifications.  The town is defended by two extensive forts, apparently of granite with bastions, one upon each side of the River and commanding the mouth: the nearest one is at the distance of a mile and a third, within gunshot. they are not elevated much above the sandy plain, or isthmus, on which the town is situated.  We are now out of harm's way from the hill‑fort, and ready to throw shot or shells into the town.  The letters from shore say that a messenger has come down from the King, but that nothing further can be done until our hostages are given up.  The Capt. decided to go in once more in person taking the Chief Mandarin, together with a guard similar to the one of the other day.  One of the boats was stationed at the mouth of the river who was to signallize us of any danger to the party ashore.  The starboard guns were manned and every thing ready for action.  The boat was watched with great interest, but in vain.  At one time we saw the masts of some 8 or 10 gun boats over the land slowly moving down towards the mouth; but the third cutter 'gave no sign' and presently the whole reappeared and made sail for the ship.

                           "It seems that we were doomed to be humbugged by these cunning rascals.  The parley was very long & unsatisfactory, held at first in the boats. The chief Mandarins were sent for in vain, altho' they were under the guns of their own forts and surrounded by any quantity of their own soldiers. The Capt. and his party again marched up thro' the line of soldiers, to the house of the Mandarin, where we had been first received.  But no high functionary would condescend to treat: altho' a large reinforcement of soldiers came down from the fort, armed with muskets, pikes, swords etc, accompanied by a couple of banners.  Nothing could be done and threats were reiterated on our part, that unless the Frenchman was delivered up in 48 hours, the forts should be taken and the town destroyed.

                           "In changing our berth the three prizes were forgotten for the time and upon going onboard of them this evening, the Master, who has had charge of these Captyves [sic], was astounded to find the three Captains, ornamented by enormous heavy yokes!  It seems that the hill fort mandarin had come onboard in our absence and flogg'd them most unmercifully, probably for having allowed themselves to be captured, and finished by placing an enormous yoke upon them, with the mandarin seal thereon!  ‑The yoke was composed of two heavy pieces of wood of four or five feet in length, secured at each end by crosspieces and thongs, sealed.  One of the Captains or mates was also punished by having his eyes sealed up! This horrible punishment was effected by covering the closed eyelids with a plaster of pitch or other tenacious substance, also with the seal of authority thereon, which they dare not remove: To such an extent is the despotism of this country carried that when the Master, indignant at this treatment, offered to cut them free of their yokes, made a sign that the consequence would be the certain loss of their heads...  One of them exhibited the welts across his back from the barbarous bambooing.  They got their vessels underway very willingly to come once more under our protection ‑ to be free from their oppressors.

                           "Late this morning it was determined to send the three Cochin Chinese onshore, which was accordingly done, altho' I am ignorant of its object."

 

20 May 1845  "...this morning very squally.  About breakfast‑time the three Junk prizes were observed getting under way, and before our boats could get to them had made sail directly before the wind towards the mouth of the River.  In the mean time it came on to rain and blow like great guns.  The Launch and all the cutters had followed under command of Mr. Alden with positive orders to bring them back.  I started soon after in the 4th cutter and by the time we had come up to the bar, found the swell so great as to endanger the safety of the boat.  It rained and blew tremendously: we fortunately succeeded in reaching the rest of the party in safety alongside one of the Junks which had been retaken by some firing from the boats and a distant cannonading which had been kept up from the ship.  She was anchored & had sails lowered down, most of the crew of Chinese jumping overboard, some of whom, it is said, were drowned.  The other two had been drifted up the River; and altho' some six or eight gun‑boats filled with soldiers and the guns of the two forts bore directly on us, we pushed on after them.  The moment the gun‑boats saw our determination they took  to their sweeps and it was truly amusing to see ourselves pulling up by  them, side by side, in chase of the junks.  They stood by their swivels and the  people in the fort were all ready, and by one well directed discharge could have annihilated our little party.  But they did not fire; the gun‑boats got  out of our way in the quickest possible manner.  In the mean time the soldiers were paraded along the beach in front of the Town. Leaving an officer  in charge of one of the fugitives we had overtaken, we found the third, and last one, run ashore nearly a mile above the usual landing.  She was  deserted by her crew, and with the sails destroyed and most of the arms taken away: but as we commenced heaving her off, a party of some  hundred and fifty soldiers came down in Indian file, but with no other particular order, armed with spears muskets etc. parading two banners in  front. they made a stand within 20 yards of us, and having given some demonstrations of contesting our right to the junk, we made a charge upon them, leaping into the water which was about three feet deep.  A real Anglo‑Saxon shout was set up, and the whole body of Chinamen took to  their heels in the most precipitate manner.  Not a gun was fired nor a stand made by a solitary Chinaman, and such an instance of 'tall walking'  I  have not seen for many a day.  The scarlet coats fluttered in the breeze and the sand flew up from their nimble heels.  It was with difficulty our  valorous crew  could be brought back to the more common place duty of heaving off the Junk; and the Marine Officer in stead of covering our  operations by [sic] the soldiers, was very busy gathering a few fresh cocoa‑nuts.  We were astonished at their utter want of fight; we did hope they  would at least give us one volley before they ran; not a Chinese soldier could even be brought within gunshot range.  We were in a street of bamboo  houses from which they could in ambush have poured the most destructive fire; but it seems they are either waiting orders from the king, or that they are the most peaceful nation in the world.  They should be elected honorary members of our Peace Societies!  One thing was observable, that one old fellow, a quiet citizen doubtless, and not on the military line, quietly sat in the porch of his cottage hard by, not seeming to take the slightest interest in the fearful doing of his more warlike countrymen.

                           "After some trouble we got afloat and the two junks were soon being towed down the River.  The shores still lined with people and soldiers,  who followed along down the banks, all the time within gunshot, yet without offering us the slightest molestation.  They had done their duty in  endeavoring by warlike demonstrations to intimidate these 'foreign devils,' and if they would not be intimidated, what more could they do?  ‑‑When opposite the two forts again, we certainly thought they would not let us pass; but with the exception of one old fellow, who practickally [sic] plunged into the water (doubtless with the fear of bambooing before his eyes) and by sign beg'd us to stop, we met with no further molestation in our recaptures.

                           "The weather had moderated somewhat and after a long pull we got off to the ship and anchored the junks once more under her guns.  But our  trouble with these oriental vessels were doomed not to finish here.  My unfortunate one, in a squall, drifted away and got ashore, falling broadside‑too [sic] upon the beach where she was driven up by the surf.  Alden was dispatched with several boats to bring her off, but it was found necessary to take out her cargo.  By this time a crowd of people had come down to the beach, yet without offering any molestation, on the contrary, assisted in carrying ashore the cargo of olive oil in jars, blocks of granite, bricks & timber.  Indeed a squad of Chinese were soon observed coming from the town, but instead of a troop of soldiers, it proved to be a gang fetching down a huge wooden anchor, to heave off the junk.  Surely they are a queer people for belligerents!  After dinner I relieved Alden, and it was not until late this evening when we got the junk off with the rise of the tide and warped her off to the ship, where they all three are secured altho' it is blowing severely in squalls of rain.  Mine is in a leaky condition shesubsequently  found not to leak much after getting afloat), and quite a wreck, altho' she has some brass pieces of ordnance in her hold, which the  Chinese were very anxious for us to discharge on the beach.

                           "While waiting for the tide, two messengers passed by us, on jaded looking ponies, with red banners furled, and their bean bags drawn up to  their noses.  Such a pair of feathery‑heeled Mercuries were never before seen.  Sent from royalty as these most probably were, coming from the  direction of the Capitol, and belaboring their sorry nags on in this pouring rain towards the Town."

 

 21 May 1845 "The gale and swell has [sic] continued during these 24 hours with some intermissions.  Yesterday the second Bower was let go, for we have no room to spare, having gone in as close as possible, with springs, to bombard the Town.  The wind has been from N.N.W. and were we under Observatory Island should be quite safe.                                  "At daylight this morning the view was wild and grand.  Heavy, lowering clouds were rushing onwards from the sea, and wreathing wildly about the mountain summits all magnified into gigantic spectres by the rainy atmosphere; while rollers were tumbling in upon the beach to leeward, and the long sand spit from the river, one drift of snowy breakers.  One or two fishing boats appeared to be wrecked among them.  But to our surprise, we discovered three strange brigs at anchor near the three ships under the hill‑fort.  They must have come in during the night in spite of its  wildness, and must have also come from the North?  They soon displayed the yellow flag of  Cochin, as did also the ships.  They were apparently  of the same antiquated French Model.  By the way, these people in their way of doing things differently from us, hoist their flags on all the forts,  etc. at daylight and haul them down about ten o'clock.

                             "This was the day fixed upon at Capt. Percival's last interview upon the production of the Frenchman or he would take all the ships, forts, etc. – the ultimatum ‑ at 12 O'clock.  But 12 o'clock came and no bombardment.  We accuse these people of being the greatest liars in the world what will they think of all our threats?  ‑In some things they certainly set an example to Christian nations.  Before the taking of the  Mandarins the Purser had made some purchases of fresh provisions; in the midst of our bellicose perations off came the pumpkins, etc. which he had left behind.  This, other nations might have done from pride; but, who would have permitted our purchasing more supplies as we have done?  Or send of[f] a  present of several bundles of wood as the Mandarins have done since going on shore?  Or lugged a huge anchor on their shoulders some two miles to assist us in getting off the beach a vessel, which we had just retaken from them by force of arms?  Indeed they are models of Christian forbearance [sic]; or, the veriest slaves blindly obeying the orders of their master, the King, who had given orders, before the war, for them to  supply us with wood and provisions.

                             "Tonight the watch‑officers were directed to make their reports to Capt. Percival, thereby intimating his resumption of the command, which  has been held now for some six months by our excellent first Lieut. Paine.  During this time (one half since we left home) the ship has been under various and difficult circumstances, thro' all of which Mr. Paine has conducted her with judgment, firmness and admirable temper."

 

22 May 1845  "The gale having abated almost entirely, it has become pleasant once more.  During the blow we found one consolation in a respite from the excessive and continuous heat of the few previous days.  The thermom. was down to 80 and even at one time so low as 78, which caused us to put on our thick clothes once more.  Today the heat is returning.  Nothing remarkable has transpired ‑ no French Priest as yet.  In the morning a boats‑crew came off for the deserted junk which had been ashore and was  in a leaky condition.  She was then sent into the River under charge of Lieut. Grant who delivered up to the Chinese.  A large number of others came off to the other two junks, being probably their regular crews, each with his basket of 'paddy.'  They motioned to follow the one which was on her way to the River and seemed somewhat surprised when they found their little vessels chained to our stream‑cable.  We are still anchored with springs, but no sign of the threatened bombardment.  Indeed, they are so pacific as to disavow all warlike proceedings and render them ridiculous.  The Capt. with two quarter boats visited the brigs, and I learn that the only resistance they made to his going onboard, was to shove off his boat with oars & sticks!"

 

23 May 1845  "Nothing has transpired today except that Capt. P. has written to the people ashore for the purpose of opening a trade again for bullocks, etc.!..."

 

24 May 1845  "This morning two letters came off  'one big letter from Mandarin ‑ one little letter from little officer;' the former stating that they knew nothing about the French Priest and asked us to send ashore the two remaining junks; the 'little letter' on the contrary stating that the Frenchman would be  sent off soon as we gave up the junks.  After breakfast, an officer who went ashore, asked permission on the part of Capt. P. to purchase bullocks.  Their only reply was 'send ashore the junks.' The market was not opened and it was stated onshore that the three Mandarins who had  been onboard our ship were now in prison.

                            "On his return to the ship the junks were summoned and permitted to leave, which they did with some doubts lest we should fire into them  again. "We have continued filling up our water for the last two or three days from the old place."

 

25 May 1845 "It is understood now that nothing further will be done.  The Capt's final letter, it is also understood, was sent ashore this morning, stating (in Chinese) that we should sail in two days for Canton where 'we should inform the French Squadron of their refusal to give up the Bishop, and that they would immediately come hither, take their forts, burn the town and shipping.'  A letter in reply came off stating that it was 'no good to talk about burning, etc.' but that if Capt. P. would write 'good letter' they would send it to the King.  The market was also opened agreeable to the promise in  case we sent ashore the junks; but we have not availed ourselves of  it, as yet.

                           "We are now all summoned ready to drop out with the first land breezewithout having put any of our threats into execution.  By their perfect carrying out of the non‑resistance principle they have completely out‑generaled the Capt.  His offer of presents which were [sic] made, to the amount of $4000 from the President of the United States to the King of Cochin China in case the French Bishop was given up, has been rejected. Neither threats nor bribes have produced any effect upon them.  To my apprehension it seems, I must say, to have shown a sad want of 'sound  discretion,' in commencing an affair of this kind, without carrying it through to a successful issue.  They must certainly think of us, from our acts, to  be a wild, barbarous people, full of empty threats and without intellect!  ‑I am convinced in my own mind, had the capture of the Mandarins, been  followed by taking the hill‑fort and the King's ships, which might have been done without shedding one drop of blood, the fears and cupidity of the Monarch of Anam [sic] would soon have brought him to terms.

                           "The ships lying in ordinary under heavy thatches were immediately unroofed on the same day we took the junks, and they have gone on with the rigging these dismantled hulks until now they have top‑gallant yards across.  There are 3 ships, 3 brig and several junks & smaller vessels at anchor in the Cove.  While onshore they have been busily engaged fortifying the approaches to the Hill‑fort, by means of cannon and gateways which defend the paths and roads leading up to it."

 

26 May 1845 0300 Sailed to original watering place ‑‑ got wood ‑‑ sailed that night for Canton.

 

30 May 1845  Hainan Island in sight 10 leagues distant.

 

 4 Jun 1845  Sighted the Ladrones Islands ‑‑ took on a pilot for $20.

 

11 Jun 1845  Anchored 6‑7 miles below Macao ‑‑ first mail received since Rio.

 

 3 Jul 1845  Now 3‑4 miles below Whampoa, in "Blenheim Reach."

 

 2 Aug 1845  Sick up to 60, mostly dysentery ‑‑ ship has moved to “Boca Figrio."

 

27 Aug 1845  "...come down to Macao..." ‑‑ crew better ‑‑ provisioning from U. S. Naval Store in charge of a Passed Midshipman ‑‑ "...We had watered ship  at Blenheim Reach by filtering the river water into our tanks..."

 

 1 Sep 1845  Sailed.

 

 7 Sep 1845  Much rainy weather ‑‑ 100 miles from Manila at noon.

 

11 Sep 1845  Anchored "inside the islands" at the entrance to Manila Bay.

 

16 Sep 1845  Arrived at Manila.

 

25 Sep 1845  "...after 4 days of variable winds...we made the chain of islands connecting Luzon with Formosa..."

 

26 Sep 1845  Stopped at Batan island for water and bullocks.

 

28 Sep 1845  Sailed.

 

19 Oct 1845  From Bashee Passage, 3 days to SE, then up to "Madjiko Shima" and "Soo‑choo;" on 14 Oct was near Crown Island (Lat. 28N); course to NE since then, along southern coast of Japan "that terra incognita, where no Western barbarians may dare cast anchor, except one annual Dutch ship at the single port of Nangasaka [sic]..." ‑‑ "...We made...last night a small isolated rock...South Island...being in the track of Krusensterns [sic] the celebrated Russian Navigator in 1804..."

 

20 Oct 1845  Heavy "blow" overnight ‑‑ ship rolled severely, at times flooding the gun deck ‑‑ crashing crockery and furniture ‑‑ leaking deck ‑‑ sea occasionally smashing over hatch coamings ‑‑ 230 nm in 24 hours.

 

22 Oct 1845  Still squally ‑‑ ship very wet.

 

25 Oct 1845  Weather settling down ‑‑ "...a thousand miles from Japan..."

 

 2 Nov 1845  "Two Sundays have come together!  Crossed the International Date Line at Latitude 35‑30N."

 

 3 Nov 1845  Another gale ‑‑ "...ship rolling deeply as usual..." ‑‑ making 10‑11 kts under fore and main topsails and foresail only ‑‑ foresail and foretopsail  lost  in a sudden squall; maintopsail split an hour later.

 

 4 Nov 1845  Ship rolled all night ‑‑ gun deck continually flooded ‑‑ more through "ill‑fitting rudder coat" ‑‑ edging S as weather moderated.

 

 8 Nov 1845  Buried a Marine private who died after a long illness; he was son of an old Purser in the RN, and had served as a Master in the RN and a First Lieutenant in the Turkish Navy, and in the U. S. Army ‑‑ had acted as schoolmaster for ship's boys.

 

 9 Nov 1845  Still some 400 miles N of Oahu.

 

16 Nov 1845  Arrived off Honolulu ‑‑ came in from E ‑‑ a drab, brown, treeless sight ‑‑old craters "scantily clad" in short grass ‑‑ exuberant foliage inland ‑‑ at  the foot of Diamond Head was the village of "Waititi" ‑‑ many American ships present ‑‑ draft too great to enter harbor; anchored in 25 fathoms  outside the reef ‑‑ "Kamehameha III, the present Monarch, is probably the last of the Hawaiian Kings" ‑‑ the white man is a fatal presence to the Hawaiians, as he was to the Indians.

 

28 Nov 1845  A SW gale while at anchor ‑‑ 60 fathoms cable out to starboard bower and 110 to larboard ‑‑ starboard parted ‑‑ let go starboard sheet anchor.

 

29 Nov 1845  Moderating ‑‑ hove up sheet anchor ‑‑ couldn't find starboard bower ‑‑ finished watering and provisioning.

 

30 Nov 1845  Still blowing ‑‑ "...let go another anchor..." ‑‑ 1000 standing off and on the island.

 

 2 Dec 1845  Filled away for California.

 

 3 Dec 1845  "...weathered Oahu..." ‑‑ sailing on orders "found from Commodore Sloat in command of the Pacific Squadron, for us to fill up with six months provisions and report to him at Monterey or Mazatlan.  This was a great disappoint [sic] to us who fully expected the ship would return almost directly to the United States.  But such is life! especially Naval life!  Little did we think the Texas question would so sensibly affect us in the Pacific Ocean!"

 

25 Dec 1845  Within 100 nm of California coast ‑‑ has been a long, tedious sail with constant heavy  weather ‑‑ Lat. 38‑47N, Long. 125‑20W.

 

29 Dec 1845  "Rain, rain, incessant!" ‑‑ crew suffering from constant exposure.

 

31 Dec 1845  Briefly sighted Monterey Bay ‑‑ weather now clear and pleasant, but wind dead wrong.

 

 1 Jan 1846  Squally and rainy ‑‑ filled away for Mazatlan.

 

 4 Jan 1846  Passed Point Conception ‑‑ off San Miguel Island at midnight.

 

10 Jan 1846  Weather "soft and mild" somewhere S of Guadelupe Island.

 

11 Jan 1846  Passed a few miles off Cabo San Lucas.

 

12 Jan 1846  "The squadron is at Mazatlan!" ‑‑ news from whalers.

 

13 Jan 1846  Arrived at Mazatlan.

 

22 Apr 1846  "Homeward bound" at 1300 after 3 months of just sitting ‑‑ "...a 'war' with Mexico has seemed so preposterous..."

 

 1 May 1846  Lat. 7‑22N, Long. 108‑47W.

 

10 May 1846  Crossed the Equator again.

 

12 May 1846  10 nm off Valparaiso; adverse winds.

 

13 May 1846  Arrived in Valparaiso for provisions and water.

 

20 May 1846  A portion of the crew on liberty during stay ‑‑ sailed this AM ‑‑ U. S. Naval Store had only whiskey to offer.

 

24 Jun 1846  "Great have been the preparations for doubling the formidable Cape Horn..." ‑‑ guns forward and those aft of the mizzen lashed down amidships; ports secured ‑‑ "She begins to roll!"

 

 4 Jul 1846  "...Off Cape Horn..." ‑‑ hove to in SE gale ‑‑ 34 degrees ‑‑ "...here we are shivering...in 53S..." ‑‑ "...the Frigate rolled tremendously and. Our 'independence dinner' underwent marvellous transmutations and chaotic confusions, not to mention broken crockery, gravy capsized, and turkies  [sic]  that took wing even from under the carver's fork..."

 

 6 Jul 1846  Gale only lasted 24 hours ‑‑ now 60 nm S of Cape Horn ‑‑ sleet and snow squalls.

 

 7 Jul 1846  Passed 50‑60 nm S of Diego Ramirez ‑‑ thick weather, no observations ‑‑  "...once more in the Atlantic!" ‑‑ snowstorm ‑‑ 30 degrees.

 

 8 Jul 1846  27 degrees.

 

15 Jul 1846  Lat. 42S ‑‑ 50 degrees ‑‑ under studdingsails ‑‑ beautiful.

 

11 Aug 1846  A week was spent just S of Rio de la Plata because of  head winds, and a gale ‑‑ stopped at Rio de Janeiro ‑‑ in Rio, saw frigate COLUMBIA  (Commdore Ropeau) painted entirely black, sloop DALE, brig BAINBRIDGE ‑‑ huge packages of letters and papers for all hands ‑‑  participated in salutes to the birth of the second child of Emperor Dom Pedro II ‑‑ Mr. Wise was visited ‑‑ Sailing Master Strain transferred to  COLUMBIA –  Doctor Reinhart left.

 

Abstract Total miles sailed 52,370.5.

 


 

 

Daily 1200 Positions

 

May 13  12‑51N, 26‑40W

 30  40‑32N, 72‑55W 14  11‑17N, 26‑50W

 31  39‑39N,  ‑‑‑  15 9‑59N, 27‑10W

  16 9‑04N, 27‑05W

Jun 17 7‑54N, 25‑25W

  1  39‑13N, 68‑09W  18 7‑53N, 23‑34W

  2  39‑21N, 66‑16W  19 7‑09N, 23‑33W

  3  39‑23N, 63‑55W  20 6‑16N, 20‑52W

  4  39‑01N, 60‑21W  21 4‑43N, 21‑17W

  5  38‑57N, 58‑25W  22 3‑14N, 23‑36W

  6  40‑23N, 55‑41W  23 1-14N, 25‑35W

  7  40‑27N, 52‑10W  24 1‑06S, 26‑33W

  8  40‑20W, 48‑57W 25 3‑45S, 27‑59W

  9  40‑40N, 43‑50W  233.2nm 26 6‑13S, 29‑36W

 10  40‑18N, 39‑51W 27 8‑59S, 31‑06W

 11  39‑55N, 36‑10W  209.6nm  28  12‑03S, 32‑23W

 12  39‑32N, 32‑30W 29  14‑14S, 33‑49W

 13  39‑14N, 31‑20W 30  17‑41S, 35‑58W  226.4nm

 14  39‑07N, 31‑06W 31  20‑27S, 38‑26W

 15  38‑13N, 29‑47W

 16  38‑22N, 28‑46W  Aug

 20  38‑22N, 28‑46W 1  22‑35S, 40‑31W

 21  36‑59N, 26‑40W 2  22‑35S, 40‑31W

 22  35‑03N, 23‑09W  247.6 nm

 23  33‑22N, 19‑24W Sep

 24  32‑37N, 17‑12W 8  23‑13S, 42‑54W

 29  32‑37N, 17‑12W 9  24‑54S, 40‑35W

 30  31‑19N, 16‑57W 10  25‑48S, 38‑48W

  11 27-18S, 36‑02W

Jul  12  28‑19S, 33‑35W

  1  28‑48N, 16‑00W  13  30‑16S, 32‑40W

  6  28‑48N, 16‑00W  14  31‑43S, 31‑38W

  7  26‑03N, 17‑08W  15  32‑05S, 29‑52W

  8  23‑51N, 19‑17W  16  32‑02S, 28‑44W

  9  21‑30N, 21‑35W  17  32‑38S, 27‑34W

 10  19‑25N, 23‑48W 18  32‑49S, 25‑29W

 11  17‑48N, 25‑42W 19  32‑40S, 25‑15W

 12  15‑17N, 26‑22W 20  32‑43S, 23‑20W

Sep  30 8‑44S, 41‑54E

  21  33‑13S, 19‑37W  208.4nm

 22  33‑57S, 15‑40W Dec

 23  36‑27S, 12‑41W  1 9‑40S, 43‑22E

 24  36‑32S, 12‑32W  2  10‑15S, 44‑44E

 25  37‑37S, 10‑46W  3  10‑23S, 45‑21E

 26  38‑09S, 7‑34W  4  10‑06S, 46‑05E

 27  38‑34S, 4‑30W  5 9‑34S, 46‑56E

 28  38‑33S, 1‑00W  6 8‑06S, 47‑27E

 29  38‑10S, 2‑32E 7 7‑01S, 47‑52E

 30  37‑16S, 6‑51E 8 6‑51S, 47‑54E

 9 6‑08S, 48‑36E

Oct 10 5‑22S, 49‑51E

  1  36‑38S, 9‑39E  11 4‑32S, 50‑58E

  2  37‑08S, 9‑39E  12 3‑36S, 52‑40E

  3  37‑02S, 16‑20E  13 2‑51S, 54‑55E

  4  36‑31S, 20‑12E  203.0nm 14 2‑49S, 58‑03E

  5  35‑51S, 23‑25E  15 2‑49S, 61‑06E

  6  36‑15S, 24‑43E  16 2‑29S, 65‑24E

  7  35‑19S, 27‑35E  17 2‑11S, 68‑52E

  8  33‑02S, 30‑40E  216.0nm 18 2‑10S, 71‑02E

  9  31‑04S, 34‑14E  19 2‑10S, 73‑25E

 10  29‑49S, 35‑53E 20 1‑48S, 75‑47E

 11  28‑48S, 37‑15E 21 1‑30S, 77‑38E

 12  28‑25S, 40‑00E 22 1‑13S, 80‑29E

 13  27‑30S, 40‑57E 23 0‑54S, 83‑10E

 14  25‑20S, 42‑46E 24 0‑28S, 85‑02E

 15  24‑14S, 43‑34E 25 0‑23N, 87‑27E

 20  23‑32S, 43‑35E 26 0‑56N, 88‑54E

 21  20‑55S, 42‑15E 27 1‑28N, 90‑07E

 22  18‑16S, 42‑17E 28 1‑50N, 91‑15E

 23  17‑22S, 42‑56E 29 2‑14N, 91‑47E

 24  15‑40S, 42‑13E 30 2‑58N, 92‑25E

 25  15‑15S, 40‑49E 31 3‑02N, 93‑55E

 27  15‑15S, 40‑49E

 28  15‑28S, 42‑14E  1845

 29  15‑26S, 42‑46E

 30  15‑40S, 43‑57E  Jan

 31  15‑33S, 45‑05E 1 3‑27N, 95‑59E

 2 3‑39N, 96‑14E

Nov  3 3‑42N, 96‑56E

  1  15‑39S, 45‑54E  6 3‑38N, 96‑56E

  5  15‑16S, 46‑05E  7 3‑54N, 96‑24E

  6  14‑07S, 47‑17E  8 4‑12N, 96‑07E

  7  14‑07S, 47‑17E  9 4‑38N, 95‑40E

 12  14‑07S, 47‑17E 10 6‑23N, 94‑20E

 13  11‑10S, 47‑36E 11 6‑26N, 94‑43E

 14 9‑42S, 45‑11E  12 6‑57N, 94‑50E

 15 8‑06S, 42‑28E  13 6‑53N, 95‑10E

 16 6‑31S, 40‑36E  14 6‑32N, 96‑19E

 17 5‑32S, 39‑34E  15 6‑00N, 97‑05E

 27 5‑28S, 39‑00E  16 5‑48N, 97‑30E

 28 6‑53S, 39‑54E  17 5‑56N, 97‑57E

 29 7‑51S, 40‑35E  18 6‑32N, 97‑58E

Jan  19 4‑47N, 114‑18E

  19 5‑57N, 98‑44E 18 4‑59N, 114‑09E

 20 5‑39N, 99‑23E  19 4‑46N, 113‑27E

 21 5‑12N, 99‑57E  20 4‑42N, 113‑19E

 22 4‑51N, 100‑30E  21 4‑42N, 112‑27E

 23 4‑43N, 100‑32E  22 4‑53N, 112‑08E

 24 4‑25N, 100‑41E  23 4‑40N, 111‑29E

 25 3‑17N, 101‑06E  24 5‑28N, 110‑19E

 26 2‑55N, 101‑02E  25 6‑50N, 109‑52E

 27 2‑39N, 101‑02E  26 8‑24N, 108‑55E

 28 2‑18N, 101‑02E  27 8‑48N, 109‑03E

 29 2‑18N, 101‑02E  28 9‑10N, 109‑04E

 30 1‑32N, 102‑00E  29 9‑29N, 109‑26E

 31 1‑22N, 102‑00E  30  10‑13N, 109‑36E

Feb  May

  1 1‑22N, 102‑00E  1  10‑23N, 109‑33E

  2 1‑22N, 102‑00E  2  10‑47N, 109‑27E

  3  10‑56N, 109‑24E

Mar  4  10‑58N, 109‑34E

 10 1‑22N, 102‑00E 5  11‑42N, 109‑45E

 11 1‑16N, 104‑16E 6  14‑05N, 109‑43E

 12 1‑01N, 105‑54E 7  16‑08N, 108‑53E

 13 1‑03N, 106‑13E 8  16‑05N, 108‑29E

 14 1‑12N, 106‑31E 9  16‑16N, 108‑32E

 15 1‑19N, 107‑00E 10  16‑11N, 108‑21E

 16 1‑20N, 107‑30E 11  16‑11N, 108‑21E

 17 1‑02N, 108‑41E 27  16‑12N, 108‑19E

 18 1‑20N, 108‑41E 28  16‑14N, 108‑50E

 22 1‑27N, 108‑47E 29  17‑12N, 109‑30E

 23 1‑48N, 108‑56E 30  17‑58N, 110‑04E

 24 2‑09N, 108‑47E 31  18‑08N, 110‑19E

 25 2‑39N, 108‑21E

 26 3‑09N, 108‑32E  Jun

 27 3‑30N, 109‑12E  1  18‑40N, 111‑04E

 28 3‑50N, 109‑17E  2  19‑32N, 112‑00E

 29 4‑30N, 110‑31E  3  20‑15N, 112‑38E

 30 4‑43N, 111‑08E  4  21‑28N, 113‑32E

 31 4‑06N, 112‑02E

Sep

Apr  1  21‑34N, 113‑50E

  1 4‑13N, 112‑07E 2  19‑51N, 115‑04E

  2 4‑14N, 112‑29E 3  18‑20N, 116‑45E

  3 4‑30N, 112‑49E 4  17‑11N, 118‑51E

  4 4‑30N, 113‑20E 5  16‑24N, 118‑35E

  5 4‑51N, 114‑00E 6  16‑03N, 118‑47E

  6 5‑10N, 114‑54E 7  15‑08N, 118‑51E

 10 5‑18N, 115‑04E 8  14‑18N, 120‑02E

 11 5‑47N, 115‑07E 9  14‑30N, 120‑07E

 12 5‑43N, 115‑10E 10  14‑06N, 120‑24E

 13 5‑30N, 115‑05E 21  15‑03N, 119‑35E

 14 5‑07N, 114‑52E 22  16‑35N, 119‑07E

 15 5‑08N, 114‑39E 23  18‑22N, 119‑50E

 16 4‑49N, 114‑27E 24  19‑52N, 121‑04E

Sep  14  24‑15N, 153‑33W

  25  20‑35N, 121‑40E 15  22‑01N, 156‑51W

 28  20‑36N, 122‑12E  16  22‑01N, 156‑21W

 29  19‑55N, 122‑44E

 30  19‑34N, 123‑53E  Dec

 2  22‑01N, 156‑21W

Oct  3  21‑50N, 157‑47W

  1  19‑12N, 124‑58E  4  23‑07N, 158‑52W

  2  20‑05N, 124‑59E  5  24‑25N, 159‑35W

  3  21‑03N, 124‑57E  6  26‑00N, 159‑32W

  4  21‑25N, 124‑53E  7  27‑44N, 160‑14W

  5  22‑52N, 123‑50E  8  29‑32N, 160‑30W

  6  23‑44N, 124‑13E  9  31‑15N, 159‑41W

  7  24‑37N, 125‑02E  10  32‑38N, 158‑52W

  8  24‑49N, 125‑55E  11  33‑52N, 157‑57W

  9  24‑43N, 126‑30E  12  34‑57N, 156‑38W

 10  25‑53N, 126‑51E 13  36‑00N, 152‑37W

 11  26‑08N, 128‑15E 14  36‑30N, 148‑27W

 12  26‑44N, 129‑06E 15  36‑31N, 147‑12W

 13  27‑17N, 129‑20E 16  37‑32N, 144‑03W

 14  27‑59N, 129‑50E 17  38‑09N, 140‑45W

 15  29‑25N, 133‑14E 18  38‑29N, 139‑20W

 16  29‑25N, 135‑50E 19  38‑05N, 137‑08W

 17  29‑35N, 136‑09E 20  38‑30N, 134‑20W

 18  31‑25N, 138‑25E 21  38‑34N, 131‑52W

 19  31‑33N, 139‑53E 22  38‑44N, 129‑15W

 20  33‑15N, 143‑48E 226.4nm 23  38‑34N, 126‑58W

 21  33‑22N, 146‑38E 24  38‑57N, 125‑00W

 22  32‑24N, 149‑09E 25  38‑47N, 125‑20W

 23  31‑14N, 150‑58E 26  38‑38N, 125‑07W

 24  32‑47N, 151‑52E 27  38‑35N, 124‑07W

 25  34‑31N, 155‑14E 28  37‑44N, 124‑20W

 26  34‑15N, 158‑05E 29  37‑22N, 123‑30W

 27  33‑57N, 158‑53E 30  37‑13N, 123‑11W

 28  34‑34N, 162‑39E 229.0nm 31  36‑51N, 122‑22W

 29  35‑35N, 167‑02E 204.6nm

 30  35‑36N, 171‑16E 210.0nm 1846

 31  33‑08N, 173‑11E

Jan

Nov

  1  34‑11N, 174‑38E  1  36‑32N, 122‑40W

  2  35‑19N, 177‑51E  2  35‑31N, 122‑34W

  2  35‑52N, WEST  236.0nm  3  34‑45N, 121‑55W

  3  35‑35N, 173‑33W 211.4nm  4  32‑56N, 119‑30W

  4  34‑42N, 168‑54W 216.6nm  5  30‑29N, 118‑38W

  5  33‑53N, 165‑36W  6  28‑10N, 117‑18W

  6  32‑17N, 162‑50W 213.4nm  7  26‑09N, 115‑15W

  7  30‑28N, 159‑47W  8  24‑33N, 113‑46W

  8  29‑03N, 158‑25W  9  23‑56N, 112‑34W

  9  28‑10N, 156‑50W  10  23‑15N, 111‑24W

 10  27‑07N, 154‑29W 11  22‑43N, 109‑50W

 11  26‑29N, 153‑52W 12  22‑51N, 109‑01W

 12  26‑04N, 153‑42W 13  23‑04N, 107‑34W

 13  25‑28N, 152‑52W 14  23‑04N, 107‑34W

Apr 11  33-15S, 72‑11W

  22  23‑04N, 107‑34W  12  33‑12S, 71‑50W

 23  21‑02N, 108‑02W 13  33‑12S, 71‑50W

 24  18‑41N, 108‑11W 20  33‑12S, 71‑50W

 25  16‑33N, 108‑21W 21  33‑17S, 74‑08W

 26  14‑31N, 108‑32W 22  33‑42S, 76‑38W

 27  12‑09N, 108‑36W 23  34‑06S, 77‑37W

 28  10‑04N, 108‑38W 24  36‑39S, 78‑52W

 29 8‑15N, 108‑51W  25  39‑06S, 78‑23W

 30 7‑22N, 108‑47W  26  40‑02S, 78‑07W

 27  40‑44S, 78‑54W

May  28  43‑28S, 81‑52W

  1 6‑55N, 108‑42W 29  45‑12S, 81‑01W

  2 6‑22N, 108‑32W 30  46‑16S, 81‑07W

  3 5‑45N, 107‑36W

  4 5‑00N, 106‑47W  Jul

  5 4‑08N, 106‑01W  1  47‑54S, 80‑59W

  6 3‑45N, 105‑26W  2  49‑14S, 80‑48W

  7 3‑26N, 107‑01W  3  52‑24S, 80‑20W 203.6nm

  8 3‑01N, 109‑03W  4  54‑05S, 77-58W

  9 1‑23N, 110‑31W  5  54‑13S, 76‑34W

 10 0‑01S, 111‑49W  6  56‑44S, 73‑39W 206.0nm

 11 1‑46S, 112‑18W  7  56‑58S, 67‑37W 205.4nm

 12 4‑08S, 113‑28W  8  55‑02S, 61‑14W 217.0nm

 13 6‑31S, 114‑45W  9  52‑50S, 57‑28W 200.4nm

 14 8‑33S, 116‑32W  10  49‑50S, 55‑19W

 15  10‑07S, 116‑52W 11  48‑37S, 55‑19W

 16  12‑26S, 116‑54W 12  47‑04S, 53‑43W

 17  14‑27S, 117‑05W 13  44‑31S, 53‑06W

 18  16‑38S, 115‑56W 14  43‑35S, 52‑21W

 19  18‑26S, 113‑10W 15  42‑24S, 51‑31W

 20  19‑42S, 110‑46W 16  40‑25S, 50‑34W

 21  20‑05S, 109‑43W 17  37‑36S, 49‑47W

 22  19‑57W, 109‑17W  18  35‑48S, 48‑52W

 23  20‑47S, 109‑32W  19  34‑39S, 48‑18W

 24  22‑01S, 109‑31W  20  34‑31S, 49‑21W

 25  22‑47S, 109‑31W  21  33‑35S, 48‑52W

 26  23‑20S, 109‑42W  22  33‑14S, 47‑46W

 27  24‑48S, 108‑53W  23  32‑51S, 46‑56W

 28  26‑31S, 106‑38W  24  32‑04S, 44‑36W

 29  27‑05S, 105‑00W  25  29‑41S, 43‑50W

 30  27‑33S, 103‑22W  26  25‑57S, 43‑19W 205.4nm

 27  23-15S, 43‑26W

Jun  28  23‑15S, 43‑26W

  1  31‑03S, 97‑28W 204.0nm

  2  32‑19S, 93‑28W 232.0nm Aug

  3  32‑52S, 88‑47W 209.2nm 6  To sea

  4  32‑58S, 85‑20W 7  No observations

  5  32‑51.5S, 82‑14W  8  25‑44S, 41‑10W

  6  32‑44S, 78‑27W 9  25‑03S. 40‑13W

  7  32‑53S, 77‑55W 10  No observations

  8  33‑09S, 76‑04W 11  22‑36S, 37‑54W

  9  33‑38S, 75‑01W 12  21‑32S, 37‑08W

 10  33‑36S, 72‑18W  13  19‑46S, 36‑17W

Aug

 14  17‑03S, 35‑21W

 15  13‑57S, 34‑40W

 16  11‑06S, 33‑27W

 17 8‑40S, 33‑27W

 18 5‑59S, 34‑04W

 19 3‑18S, 35‑37W

 20 0‑39S, 37‑35W

 21 2‑02N, 39‑14W

 22 4‑06N, 41‑13W

 23 5‑34N, 41‑54W

 24 7‑06N, 42‑55W

 25 7‑53N,  ‑‑‑‑

 26  ‑‑‑ , 43‑24W

 27 8‑40N, 43‑04W

 28  No observations

 29  No observations

 30  ‑‑‑ , 44‑53W

Sep

  1  No observations

  2  17‑54N, 48‑45W

  3  19‑30N, 52‑13W

  4  20‑54N, 54‑40W

  5  22‑11N, 56‑54W

  6  23‑42N, 58‑51W

  7  25‑12N, 61‑03W

  8  26‑40N, 62‑48W

  9  27‑37N, 64‑17W

 10  28‑19N, 65‑15W

 11  29‑14N, 66‑29W

 12  30‑05N, 67‑41W

 13  31‑37N, 69‑20W

 14  32‑55N, 69‑27W

 15  33‑12N, 70‑33W

 16 ‑‑‑‑ , 71‑14W

 17  35‑30N, 73‑15W

 18  36‑39N, 74‑02W

 19  37‑12N, 74‑01W

 20  37‑28N, 74‑30W

 21  37‑56N, 74‑33W

 22  38‑27N, 72‑50W

 23  38‑53N, 73‑16W

 24  39‑36N, 72‑40W

 25 ‑‑‑‑ , 71‑04W

 26  41‑37N, 69‑35W

  

 

  The Crew of the U. S. Frigate Constitution is composed of  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

 

5

6

 

 

s

n

r

t

t

t

 

 

t

d

d

h

h

h

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D

D

D

D

D

D

 

 

i

i

i

i

i

i

 

 

v

v

v

v

v

 

 

 

i

i

i

i

i

i

 

 

s

s

s

s

s

s

 

 

i

i

i

i

i

i

 

 

o

o

o

o

o

o

 

 

n

n

n

n

n

n

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Americans 

24

32

32

11

36

34

169

Canadians

 2

 3

 2

 - -

 -

  7

 

West Indians

 1

 -

 -

 -

 -

 -

  1

English 

10

12

 6

 2

 7

 6

 43

Irish 

10

11

13

 4

 6

 6

 50

Scotch 

 3

 4

 4

 2

 4

 1

 18

French 

 4

 1

 -

 1

 -

 -

  6

Spaniards

 -

 -

 1

 -

 -

 1

  2

Hanovarians

 -

 1

 -

 -

 1

 -

  2

Saxons

 1

 -

 -

 2

 6

 -

  9

Hambourgh 

 2

 3

 1

 -

 1

 1

  8

Hessen Darmot

 -

 1

 -

 -

 -

 1

  2

Bremer 

 -

 -

 -

 -

 -

 1

  1

Dutch

 3

 2

 2

 -

 2

 2

 11

Prussians

 -

 1

 2

 -

 -

 -

  3

Russians 

 -

 1

 -

 1

 2

 -

  4

Norwegians

 1

 -

 1

 -

 -

 1

  3

Swedes

 3

 3

 2

 5

 4

 2

 19

Danes

 -

 2

 1

 -

 2

 1

  6

Welsh

 -

 1

 -

 1

 1

 1

  4

Mahonese

 -

 1

 -

 -

 -

 -

  1

Fayal

 -

 -

 1

 -

 -

 -

  1

Italians

 -

 -

 1

 -

 -

 1

  2

Australian

 -

 -

 -

 1

-

 -

  1

Chilian 

 -

 -

 -

 1

 -

 -

  1

Swisse [sic]

 -

 -

 -

 -

 -

 1

  1

Portugese[sic]

 -

 -

 -

 -

 -

 1

  1

Chinese 

 -

 -

 -

 -

 -

 5

  5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total of Blue Jackets

71

74

71

28

66

71

381

 

 

Total of Americans 169

Total of Foreigners 212

Foreigners exceed natives by 43