M 0125
CAPTAINS' LETTERS TO THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY
1805-61;  1866-85,

IN NATIONAL ARCHIVES (413 ROLLS)

 

 Note:  Only those rolls covering periods when CONSTITUTION was in squadron service have been researched.

 

Roll 1 (January 8 ‑ June 29, 1805)

                

Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, to Consul William Jarvis, Lisbon, Portugal, 10 Jan 1805:

 

            "The Spindle which is the essential part of the old Bowsprit..."

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 8 Jun 1805:

 

            Reports the signing of the Tripoline peace treaty on 3 Jun and the liberation of the PHILADELPHIA crew.

 

Roll 2 (July 1 ‑ August 31, 1805)

 

From Commanding Officer, HMS PHOEBE, to Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 17 Jul 1805:

 

            Has received petitions from Charles Wilson, James Pearson, Stephen Kentle, and Edward Parker of CONSTITUTION wishing to surrender themselves to him as deserters from HMS JUNO.  Has on board John Graves and John Pindar, deserters from CONSTITUTION, as well as John Kelly and Allen Fish, American who he impressed from a ship at sea.  Willing to "trade."

 

Roll 3 (September 1 ‑ December 31, 1805)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 4 (January 1 ‑ May 21, 1806)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 5 (May 21 ‑ July 31, 1806)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 26 May 1806:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of permission to return to the US (SecNav ltr of 22 Mar 1806).  Intends to exchange ships with Captain Hugh Campbell and leave him HORNET and ENTERPRIZE as other squadron units.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 2 Jun 1806:

 

            Believes his command of squadron is temporary.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 10 Jul 1806:

 

            Most men transferred to CONSTITUTION from other squadron units prior to their return to the US are deeply in debt to the Department and presently bereft of clothing.  Requests stoppage of all allotments in order that they might be clothed.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 10 Jul 1806 [2nd ltr]:

 

            CONSTITUTION needs new standing rigging and sails before winter, as well as spare cordage canvas, paints, etc.  The hull is in good condition, but the rudder head is "a little defective."

 

Roll 6 (August 1 ‑ December 31, 1806)

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 8 Sep 1806:

 

            Since writing from Cadiz on 28 Jul, has visited the Barbary Coast.  While standing in to Larache [Morocco] on 14 Aug, met and examined the Russian frigate [sic] SUWARROW [SUVAROV] (20 guns), which the Tsar received from the British last year.  Was informed they are now at war with the Greeks.  On 16 Aug, anchored at Tangier, where all was well, and at Gibraltar on the 19th.  Captain [David] Porter in ENTERPRIZE present; told of being fired upon by Spanish gunboats off Algeciras on the 15th.  I decided to let it pass as he gave better than he got: no casualties and only some rigging damage.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 8 Sep 1806 [2nd ltr]:

 

            A serious defect had been found in the foremast "a little above the hounds."  A long‑standing defect according to longer‑serving officers, but, in combination with the worn standing rigging places the ship in danger.  Accordingly, thought it prudent to put into Lisbon for repairs.  Now fitting fishes and a gang of new standing rigging.  Left Gibraltar on the 3rd.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 1 Oct 1806:

 

            Foremast has proven unfit for service.  A new set of courses and topsails required.  Understands the ship is to be "called home next summer."  Will use old canvas for needed hammocks, etc.  Ship must be caulked "all over."  A new anchor should be purchased.  The new foremast will not be ready in less than 20 days.  (The same carpenter who made the bowsprit is doing this job.)  References the mast's "main spindle."

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 Oct 1806:

 

            Midshipman Cheshire, court‑martialled in JOHN ADAMS and transferred to NAUTILUS, was transferred to this ship at his own request prior to her departure.  Has been repeatedly intoxicated and neglectful of duties.  Sending him home for court‑martial on charges of insolence, contempt toward a senior, and direct disobedience of orders.  Mentioned are Mr. Ludlow, 1st Lt, and Mr. Wolsey, 2nd lt.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 15 Oct 1806:

 

            Dr. Simm died of consumption on the 11th.  Interred at the Church Corpo Santo, as he was a Catholic.  Dr. McAllister acting in his stead.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 5 Nov 1806:

 

            All now in order.  Will leave "tomorrow."  Would have left sooner, but on 28 Oct found the fore and main stays were "stranded" and needed replacement.  New ones received yesterday; being rigged now.  New anchor purchased from Portuguese Navy.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 20 Dec 1806:

 

            Sailed from Lisbon on 9th and arrived at Gibraltar on 18th, after calling at Cadiz.  Will depart on 22nd and call at Algiers enroute Tunis.

 

Roll 7 (January 1 ‑ May 31, 1807)

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 26 January 1807:

 

            Left Gibraltar 22 Dec 1806 and arrived Algiers 29 Dec.  Sailed 4 Jan 1807 and arrived Tunis 11 Jan.  All is well with newly returned Ambassador and his report of his mission to the US.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 26 Jan 1807 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Dr. McAllister, who replaced the deceased Dr. Simm is himself now incapacitated, his left arm crippled by rheumatism.  There is no Surgeon aboard to attend the 30 currently sick; only a loblolly boy who can do tooth extractions and blood letting.  Crew's health is bad enough that he will not permit Colonel Lear to travel in the ship.  Too, Dr. Heap is seriously ill at Messina, his place in HORNET being taken by a Mate from               ENTERPRIZE.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION 1 Feb 1807:

 

            French and Spanish corsairs are now attacking our shipping near Alicante, but resources with which to convoy them are lacking ‑‑ even if the merchants would consider it.  Thinks the Congress ought to pass a law requiring insurers to mandate convoying as a part of their policies.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 15 Feb 1807:

 

            British now occupying Syracuse, placing accommodations at a premium.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 17 Feb 1807:

 

           Our hospital at Syracuse is now being used by the British.  Would like to dispose of 2 gunboats and the trabacalos purchased in the Adriatic.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 17 Feb 1807 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Repairs at Lisbon cost L1961.8.7.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 17 Feb 1807 [3rd ltr]:

 

            When at Malta, was surprised to find Dr. Heap fully recovered and immediately ordered him to duty in CONSTITUTION.  Arrived at Syracuse on 2 Feb with HORNET, which was met while inbound.  Sailed on 16 Feb with HORNET, the latter to proceed to Leghorn.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, n. d.:

 

            Arrived at Tunis 18 Feb and on the 24th learned from Colonel Lear that all was well.  Called on the Bey on the 27th, and on 3 Mar called again to take leave.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 8 Apr 1807:

 

            ENTERPRIZE was in company on arrival at Tunis.  Sailed from Tunis on 7 Mar for Algiers, leaving ENTERPRIZE behind to carry the Tunisian Ambassador to Gibraltar.  Arrived at Algiers on 20 Mar and sailed again on the 23rd, arriving at Cagliari on the 30th to get fresh provisions.  Intend going to Malta next when wind permits.  [Sailed on 9 or 10 Apr.]

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 12 May 1807:

 

            Arrived at Malta 13 Apr.  Repairing head of ship, where head rails and bumpkins were washed away on the night of 7 Mar in the Gulf of Tunis.  A new mainsail from Lisbon was lost, as well as a mizzen stormsail and the fore topmast staysail.  Also repairing cabin bulkheads "which received much damage on our passage from Algiers to Cagliari."  Left Malta 2 May and intend leaving Syracuse on the 25th for Leghorn enroute to Gibraltar where relief is expected.

 

Roll 8 (June 1 ‑ August 31, 1807)

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 15 Aug 1807:

 

            Left Syracuse 12 Jun and anchored at Malaga on 2 Aug with HORNET.  Received a Boston newspaper and learned of CHESAPEAKE incident.  Will send ENTERPRIZE home as her crew's time has expired, and await further news here.  Has ordered the sale of the trabacalos and all perishable articles at the hospital.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 18 Aug 1807:

 

            Your orders of 14 Jul received today from the schooner BALD EAGLE.

 

Roll 9 (September 1 ‑ December 31, 1807)

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 Sep 1807:

 

            Left Syracuse on 12 Jun allowing time for calls at Messina, Palermo, and Leghorn.  Arrived at Malaga 1 Aug and received report of the CHESAPEAKE "misfortune."  Of 8 carronades on board, have mounted 2 on the forecastle and 2 in place of the after quarterdeck guns.  Have transferred the other 4 to HORNET.  400 shot for these guns have been purchased.  Your 14 Jul orders reached me on 18 Aug directing the return home of all public vessels as secretly as possible.  Names enclosed of 7 whose conduct has been so atrocious I am keeping in close confinement until courts martial can be held [list missing].

 

From Comodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 14 Oct 1807:

 

            "Defects of the Constitution and Repairs necessary to put her in a State for Real Service

            "Her copper must be examined in consequence of a defect about the [obscured] That Catch the cables when winding at Anchor---  A thorough Caulking of The upper works--  New Mainmast, Mizenmast [sic] doubtfull [sic], 1 fore and Main Topmast--  1 fore, main, and Mizen Top Gt Mast-- 1 Fore and Main Topsail yard--  1 Cross Jack yard and set of Studdingsail Booms-- 1 Jibboom--  1 compleat set of sails--  4 Cables of 21 Inches---  A set of water Casks, at least a large proportion of them.

            "A set of boats--  A new Rudder At least a new Rudder Head."       

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 14 Oct 1807 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Forward charges against Marine Sergeant Hughs and others he feels require court-martial.

 

[Enclosure]

 

From Lieutenant Charles Ludlow, USS CONSTITUTION, Syracuse Harbor, 9 Jun 1807:

 

        "Yesterday between 5 & 6 oclock in the evening I gave permission for the ships's company to bathe, shortly after I came on deck andsaw two men swimming ahead of the ship towards an English frigate[.]  I immediately inform'd the officer of the deck (Lt. Burrows) of their being further from the Ship than usually allowed.  He went forward and call'd a number of times before they came and as soon as they got on board took them forward to flog, (there being company on board and on the quarter deck at the time)[.]  A few moments after I perceived a number of Men  rushing forward in the forecastle, who gave three cheers before I could get forward to know the cause of the noise, at the same time saw Mr. Burrows on one of the Guns surrounded by the men; After [sic] clearing them away he gave me the following report:--

            "That John Smith one of the above mentioned men swimming from the ship) refused to take his jacket off or stand and receive a ropes ending he intended giving him for not attending to his orders, and the Boartswain's mate (George Prince) had hove his ropes end down & refused to flog him, but previous to the Boatswain's mate refusing to flog John Hughland came forward and told John Smith that he was a damned fool if he pull'd his jacket off, at the same time told Mr. Burrows the man should not be flog'd --- It was also reported to me, that Wm Pinkney (Boatswain's mate) had taken up a crowbar near Mr. Burrows while the men were cheering---  After hearing this report, believing their conduct very Mutinous I had Prince, Pinkney, Smith, & Hughland put in Irons (the Guard during this time was under Arms) a few moments after the ships company gave three cheers again, as if displeased at what had been done--  I immediately arm'd myself and desired the officers to do the same (Mr. Amory Marine officer with all of his detachment under Arms) but while arminig the Men broke out again with t here cheers & a general cry among them, on the forecastle on the forecastle[sic], where they were all rushing as fast as possible; I then had the drum beat to quarters, which silenced them and they all went, except John Thompson who was seen on the forecastle (by Mr. Chauncey and Mr. Willmore) pulling a man back from his Quarters and crying out, on the forecastle very loudly after the drum had beaten to Quarters--- I had Thompson put in irons and all the prisoners brought from their usual pplace of confinement aft to the Cabin door with two sentinels placed over them After which I muster'd the Men at t heir quarters, beat the retreat and gave them their Hammocks----

            "At 8 oclock had the starb'd watch call'd, and the officers put ini two watches--  The officers, and marines of the Watch arm'd--  All peaceable, and answer'd as usual in the watch-- shortly after you cameon board-

            "The boat that went for you, left the Ship at thetime I desired the officers to Arm themselves.--

            "Mr. Burrows, Mr. Rouchas, Mr. McLaughlin, and Mr. Nicholson, was witness to the conduct of Prince, Pinkney, Smith & Hughland--  Mr. Chauncey & Mr. Willmore to Thompson's conduct----"

 

[Enclosure]

 

From Lieutenant William Lewis, USS CONSTITUTION, Syracuse Harbor, n.d.:

 

            "While in the Harbour of Syracuse, on the 30th day of May 1807, being my day of duty, the officer (Mr. Wilmore) who had been with a party of men at  the arsenal all day, on returning at sunset, reported two or three of them for having run away from the arsenal into the Town, where, after a long search, he had found them drunk.  Wiliam Jones was one of them.  On examination I found him very drunk, & inclined to be insolent; which provoked me to strike him.  He was then, exceedingly insolent, & as I thought mutinous, saying repeatedly that his "time was up," and I had "no right to punish him", Damn the service, & said he was a "true Englishman," & I think threatened to demand English protection.  The Endymion (Engh Frigate) was lying in the harbour ---

            "I ordered him to be put in irons.  While the Master at Arms was doing this he continued to use the expressions I have mentioned, and others equally improper, & was so riotous that I was obliged to go down myself & use force to quiet him.  Messrs Wilmer and Shields are witnesses to the particulars of the above statement.  Mr. Woolsey also, saw good deal of his riotous conduct after he was confined."

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 19 Oct 1807:

 

            Reported having on board from Leghorn the 15‑ton Tripoli monument.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 1 Nov 1807:

 

            Your orders for taking the ship to New York received 30 Oct.  Expect to sail 3 Nov.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 9 Nov 1807:

 

            Still waiting for a fair wind.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 24 Nov 1807:

 

            Arrived last evening after tedious 13‑day voyage.  Be advised George Prince shipped over in CONSTITUTION to return to US.  John Hewlan, Ordy, transferred to ship from SIREN.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 30 Nov 1807:

 

        The ship needs a new mainmast and probably mizzen, a new complete set of sails, a fore topmast, main topmast, all topgallant masts, fore and main topsail yards, a crossjack, a set of studdingsail booms, jibboom, a gang of topmast and topgallant mast rigging, 4 21" cables, a set of boats, and many water casks.

 

From Commodore Isaac Chauncey, New York Navy Yard, 1 Dec 1807:

 

            Do I overhaul CONSTITUTION's rigging or just stow it?  CONSTITUTION's Carpenter wishes orders to this yard.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 Dec 1807:

 

            Paying off the crew began today and should complete by noon tomorrow.  Guns, stores, and standing rigging still aboard should it be wanted for heaving down.  Orders on officer furloughs just received.

 

From Commodore Isaac Chauncey, New York Navy Yard, 12 Dec 1807:

 

            Orders received on CONSTITUTION's repairs.  Will use gunboats crews to offload her stores and guns, beginning today.

 

From Commodore Hugh G. Campbell, New York, NY, 12 Dec 1807:

 

            Resigned command of CONSTITUTION to Commodore Chauncey on 8 Dec.  Have given furloughs to Lieutenant and Midshipman Ludlow (30 days each), Lieutenant Woolsey (8 weeks), Lieutenant Burrows (1 month), Dr. Heap, Mr. Shields, Midshipman Chancey [sic] (20 days), Midshipman Anderson (2 months), Midshipman Marshall the same.  I will leave New York about 17 Dec for Washington, pausing a week at Philadelphia.  Bothered by rheumatism.

 

From Commodore Isaac Chauncey, New York Navy Yard, 22 Dec 1807:

 

            CONSTITUTION's wales too soft to permit driving oakum home when caulking.  It appears all will have to be replaced.

 

From Commodore Isaac Chauncey, New York Navy Yard, 26 Dec 1807:

 

            CONSTITUTION requires much more repair than previously reported.  The wales, the counter, and much side planking needs replacement.  Have not yet had to hire more laborers; using gunboat crews.  Will minimize expense wherever possible.

 

Roll 10 (January 1 ‑ March 31, 1808)

 

From Commodore Isaac Chauncey, New York Navy Yard, 30 Jan 1808:

 

            A list of personnel at the Yard identifies the following men in CONSTITUTION: Boatswain's Mate French Kellan [sic]; Seamen George Swinburn (a native of England) and Laurence Nielson (a Swede); Ordinary Seamen James Remond (an Irishman), John Thompson (a Dane), John Reinholts (a Dane); and Mattio Monocco (a Neapolitan).

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, New York Station, 1 Mar 1808:

 

            Twenty 32‑pdr carronades needed for CONSTITUTION, not 16 as I wrote before.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, New York Station, 17 Mar 1808:

 

            CONSTITUTION will be ready to receive her guns by the time the carronade carriages are completed.  The old main deck carriages can be used for the new [long] guns.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, New York Station, 24 Mar 1808:

 

            Have begun making carronade carriages per your orders of the 21st.  Iron work yet to begin.

 

Roll 11 (April 1 ‑ June 28, 1808)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, New York, Station, 12 Apr 1808:

 

            Notes SecNav orders of 18 Feb to discharge all foreigners: George Swinburn, Mattias Monocco, John Thompson, Lawrence Neilson, and John Reinholts among them.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, New York Station, 29 Apr 1808:

 

            CONSTITUTION hove "keel out" yesterday.  "...discovered that her Main Keel, directly in the wake of the scarf of the Stem, was considerably mutilated for the space of 3 1/2 feet, and that about sixty feet of her false keel was entirely off ‑‑ The defects in both, however, will be repaired, I am in hopes, by tomorrow night ‑‑ The Copper is found so good, generally, as to prevent the necessity of replacing it; indeed I think the old, which was originally in weight thirty six ounces to the square foot, better than the new now in store, as the latter is only 28 ounces ‑‑ I am in hopes we shall find the copper on the opposite side equally good ‑‑ Experiments have been made on several sheets of copper promiscuously taken from different parts of the Bottom, and the average weight found to be 34 ounces to the square foot, ... and considering that it has been six years on her Bottom...is a sufficient proof of its superior quality..."

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, New York Station, 5 May 1808:

 

            CONSTITUTION was righted last night "on the starboard side after having repaired the defects in the scarf of the stem, and false keel."  Larboard side to be "hove out Monday, the 9th," and hopes to complete it that day.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, New York Station, 14 May 1808:

 

            CONSTITUTION's bottom finished last evening.  The copper was good.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, New York Station, 23 Jun 1808:

 

            Carpenters will be done in CONSTITUTION "in a few days."

 

Roll 12 (July 2 ‑ September 1808)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, New York Station, 14 Jul 1808:

 

            Need carronades for CONSTITUTION: unable to complete carriages without them.  CONSTITUTION powder, 146 barrels, needs remanufacturing.  Not enough powder here to replace it.  This Yard needs a magazine.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, New York Station, 25 Jul 1808:

 

            The powder will be delivered for remanufacture to John Bullus as ordered.

 

Roll 13 (October 1 ‑ December 29, 1808)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 14 (January 1 ‑ March 31, 1809)

 

From Captain Isaac Chauncey, New York Navy Yard, 3 Feb 1809:

 

            What shall I do with the old CONSTITUTION copper?

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, Havre de Grace, MD, 5 Feb 1809:

 

            Acknowledges orders to command CONSTITUTION.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, New York, NY, 13 Feb 1809:

 

            Officers now in CONSTITUTION: Lieutenants Charles Ludlow (joined this date) and Samuel Angus; Sailing Master Wm F. Baggot [sic]; Midshipmen R. H. J. Perry, Daniel Turner, Lawrence Kearney, John H. Elton, John M. Funck, Augustus C. Ludlow, G. C. Read, Samuel Renshaw, and Seth Nicholson; Boatswain George Nicholson; Gunner Robert Huntress; and Carpenter Livingston Shannon.  Lieutenant Trenchard is still in command of Gunboat 43 at Passamaquoddy with Midshipman Adams under him.  Midshipman Hite is in Gunboat 50 at New Bedford.  Lieutenant Mitchell is in ARGUS at Boston.  CONSTITUTION, therefore, still needs 3 lieutenants.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 16 Feb 1809:

 

            CONSTITUTION needs 800 32‑lb. and 500 24‑lb. shot.   Shall I have them made here?

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Feb 1809:

 

            Acknowledges letter of 21st ordering the Navy Agent at New York to purchase shot for CONSTITUTION.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 Mar 1809:

 

            Neither Surgeon's Mate ordered to CONSTITUTION has reported.  "Mr. Butler" writes he is sick abed but will report when able.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 Mar 1809 [2nd ltr]:

 

            CONSTITUTION will be ready for powder the 1st of next month.  She will need a total of 250 barrels in all.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 13 Mar 1809:

 

            Merchant seamen are currently getting $20‑25 a month, making recruiting difficult.  Recommends a bounty.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 17 Mar 1809:

 

            It is rumored that $12/mo. and 3 mos. advance are being offered at Boston, Philadelphia, and Baltimore, while my last orders were $10/mo. and 2 mos. advance.  Is it true?

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Mar 1809:

 

            CONSTITUTION needs "a detachment of Marines."

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Mar 1809 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Has given Midshipman Renshaw, in "a deep decline," a furlough to recover.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CHESAPEAKE, 31 Mar 1809:

 

            Reports that ARGUS will leave "tomorrow" with 50 men for CONSTITUTION.  In a few days will send more in Gunboat 57 or a coaster.

 

Roll 15 (April 1 ‑ June 28, 1809)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 1 Apr 1809:

 

            Requests a warrant for Carpenter Livingston Shannon.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 7 Apr 1809:

 

            Requests permission to discharge of Corporal George Campbell of CONSTITUTION, a deserter.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 15 Apr 1809:

 

            CONSTITUTION's ordinary seamen and boys are nearly complete; has 2/3 of her petty officers, but needs nearly 100 seamen due to merchant ships offering $25‑35 a month.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 17 Apr 1809:

 

            Regrets the transfer of Surgeon's Mate Reynolds tomorrow to UNITED STATES.  He is "far superior" to his peers.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 22 Apr 1809:

 

            Regrets transfer of Midshipman Elton, an energetic, mentally alert, modest, amicable young man.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 27 Apr 1809:

 

            Orders to lay up all gunboats received.  All able‑bodied men in excess of two per boat will be transferred to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 28 Apr 1809:

 

            Acknowledges orders returning Surgeon's Mate Reynolds to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 30 Apr 1809:

 

            CONSTITUTION needs 5 quarter gunners, 6 quartermasters, and 60‑65 seamen to complete the crew.  May get 10 or 12 from the gunboats.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 7 May 1809:

 

            Will order Lieutenant Trenchard from Gunboat 43 to ARGUS.  Requests Lieutenant Haswell, now on Lake Champlain, as his replacement.

 

 From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 14 May 1809:

 

            Acknowledges report of Haswell being ordered to the ship.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 30 May 1809:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of warrant for Carpenter Shannon.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 11 Jun 1809:

 

            Requests a court martial for Sergeant Charles Henry of CONSTITUTION on charges of drunkenness on guard and unbecoming conduct.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, 28 Jun 1809:

 

            Says Midshipman Thomas Gamble is indefatigable in attention to duty and correct in his deportment.

 

Roll 16 (July 1 ‑ September 30, 1809)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 4 Jul 1809:

 

            Midshipman Morton Jackson died on 1 Jul after a 6‑day illness thought to have been caused by his ingesting too much ice when overheated.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 9 Jul 1809:

 

            Acknowledges orders transferring Lieutenant [Charles] Ludlow to command of VIXEN and Lieutenant George W. Reed to replace him in CONSTITUTION.  Ludlow took command today.  Reed has not yet reported.  Lieutenant Haswell joined on the 7th. CONSTITUTION still needs Marine officers, and the Marines need clothing.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 13 Jul 1809:

 

            Lieutenant Reed has yet to join.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 13 Jul [2nd ltr]:

 

            Acknowledges furlough for Midshipman Thomas Gamble to make his merchant voyage.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 13 Jul 1809 [3rd ltr]:

 

            Requests 12 rifles for CONSTITUTION is available.  Wants them for use against enemy officers from the fighting tops.  [Annotated: Any rifles here? If not let them be purchased... P.H.]

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 16 Jul 1809:

 

            Will victual the ship for 2 months.  She still needs 4 quartermasters, a quarter gunner, 41 seamen, a Carpenter, and a Boatswain.  Current Carpenter has resigned and the Boatswain has been in sick quarters for 3 months with a poor prognosis.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 19 Jul 1809:

 

            Lieutenant Reed joined on the 18th; he wishes to resign.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 20 Jul 1809:

 

            Enclosed is Midshipman [Seth] Nicholson's resignation.  He is no loss.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 22 Jul 1809:

 

            The ship is ready for sea except for noted personnel shortages.  Expect transfers from CHESAPEAKE will fill needs but for 20 seamen.  Will put to sea as soon as they arrive.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 24 Jul 1809:

 

            Forwards letter from Gunner Huntress, who has been AWOL since the 19th.  He is no loss: hardly smarter than a well‑bred horse.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 28 Jul 1809:

 

            Sailing Master William F Bagot has been AWOL since the 13th.  Have ordered Sailing Master James E Carr from ARGUS to replace him.  Bagot is an inveterate drunk.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 29 Jul 1809:

 

            Lieutenant Reed accepts your denial of his resignation.

 

 From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 4 Aug 1809:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of acceptance of Gunner Huntress' resignation.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CHESAPEAKE, 9 Aug 1809:

 

            Required men shipped to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 13 Aug 1809:

 

            Men from CHESAPEAKE arrived last night.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 14 Aug 1809:

        

            Forwards resigned Midshipman Edward S. Smith's warrant.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 20 Aug 1809:

 

            Has ordered Lieutenant Haswell to WASP.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 21 Aug 1809:

 

        After trying for 4 days to clear the Narrows, is finally at sea.  New York is a bad rendezvous for the heavy frigates.  CONSTITUTION draws 23 feet when loaded with 6 months provisions.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 24 Aug 1809:

 

            Just arrived at Newport.  Will be back at New York by 1 Sep.  Happy with crew.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 1 Sep 1809:

 

            "The Constitution I find possesses all her former good qualities, and with a little more practice, I think her crew will be a very good one."

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 5 Sep 1809:

 

            Departed New York this date.  Will cruise the coast for 2 weeks.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 17 Sep 1809:

 

            Arrived New York this date.  Nothing of note on cruise other than the loss of the main topmast and fore topmast on 10 Sep in light to moderate breezes when some 18 miles to seaward of Montauk Point.  Also lost the mizzen topgallant mast and all royal yards.  Believe white pine masts are weak; yellow or pitch pine preferred.  Seaman John Cockran [sic], masthead lookout, was lost in the accident.  Requests replacement masts be ordered in the rough from Norfolk, 58' long to finish 24" for the main and 54' long to finish 22" for the fore.  If they can't be shipped, request sailing orders to Norfolk.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 26 Sep 1809:

 

            Acknowledges sailing orders for Norfolk.

 

Roll 17 (October 2 ‑ December 31, 1809)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 6 Oct 1809:

 

            Lieutenant F. J. Mitchell has been furloughed; Midshipman Thomas Gamble attached to CONSTITUTION as Acting Lieutenant.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 7 Oct 1809:

 

            Forwards the warrant of resigning Midshipman Phineas Masters, found objectionable "by almost every officer" in the ship.  Only 14 years old and incorrigible.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 8 Oct 1809:

 

            Has ordered Midshipman T. Gamble to PRESIDENT as directed.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 10 Oct 1809:

 

            Consider reinstating Sailing Master Bagot.  I am willing to give him another chance.  Mr. Carr, now filling in, is anxious to leave the service.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 20 Oct 1809:

 

            Foul winds have kept me at New York since the 11th.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 23 Oct 1809:

 

            Have ordered Midshipman A. Ludlow to SIREN as Acting Lieutenant.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 23 Oct 1809  [2nd ltr]:

 

            Dr. Griffin joined yesterday and has relieved Dr. Thorn.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 24 Oct 1809:

 

            To sea this morning.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 26 Oct 1809:

 

            Arrived Hampton Roads this morning, a 45‑hour passage.  Will cruise 10‑12 days after getting in masts and return to New York.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, 3 Nov 1809:

 

            To sea this morning, masts in.  Expects to be at New York in a week.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 17 Nov 1809:

 

            Just arrived at New York.  Had much bad weather, but ship handled well.  Preparing to overhaul rigging and repaint her.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 17 Nov 1809 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Lieutenant John Brooks, USMC, ordered to Washington to settle accounts.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 29 Nov 1809:

 

            Dr. Reynolds furloughed as ordered.  [Appears to have tuberculosis.]

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 2 Dec 1809:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of orders to discharge Private William Seely of CONSTITUTION.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 17 Dec 1809:

 

            Midshipman George Pearce of this ship ordered to JOHN ADAMS.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 22 Dec 1809:

 

            Acknowledges information that another Marine officer will replace Lieutenant Brooks.

 

Roll 18 (January 1 ‑ April 30, 1810)

 

From Captain John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 15 Feb 1810:

 

            Returns the warrant of Midshipman [James] Bailey, a "genteel" young man too old to be a Midshipman.

 

From Captain John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 16 Feb 1810:

 

            Acknowledges information that "Mr. Thompson (Mathematician)" had been ordered to join the ship for four months, then rotate for similar periods to other ships in commission.

 

From Captain John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 21 Feb 1810:

 

            Reports that Midshipman John J. Edwards has reported himself returned from a merchant voyage and was assigned to CONSTITUTION by himself.

 

From Captain John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 12 Mar 1810:

 

            Forwards resignation of Midshipman [Samuel] Dusenberry of CONSTITUTION, "an amiable young man, but he is, by no means, calculated for the Service."

 

From Captain John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 15 Mar 1810:

 

            Ship is ready for sea.  Intends to sail on the 18th or 20th and "stretch south" to Port Royal, SC, then return north to Annapolis, MD, then back to New York, a period of 4‑5 weeks.

 

From Captain John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 20 Mar 1810:

 

            Will remain in port until the 30th, as ordered.  HORNET will accompany on "southern tour."

 

From Captain John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 31 Mar 1810:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of letter "just at the moment of my departure from New York."

 

From Captain John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 1 Apr 1810:

 

            Is cruising off Sandy Hook, ARGUS in company, awaiting HORNET.  Due to a shortage of provisions, now intends sailing only to Norfolk and Annapolis before returning to New York.

 

 From Captain John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 11 Apr 1810:

 

            Still off Sandy Hook, has sent Lieutenant Ralph Izard ashore to sick quarters "with a hypochondriacal turn of mind" and expects he will resign his commission.  Requests a replacement.

 

Roll 19 (May 1 ‑ August 30, 1810)

 

From Captain John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 13 May 1810:

 

            "On the 2nd inst I sent into this place the ships Galconda [sic] of New York & Rose of Phila for a violation of the Non‑Intercourse Law; having met with them near Sandy Hook, and within the Jurisdiction limits of the united states [sic] where they had been seen several days prior to my meeting with them.

            "The above ships were from Liverpool with cargos of British manufacture on board & I was necessarily obliged to anchor on the 11th inst inside of sandy [sic] Hook for the purpose of consulting with & stating their cases to the District Attorney, & which I shall make you acquaintance with a more particular manner the instant my [1 word] will permit me to do so‑‑  I shall put to Sea the moment the [wind] will permit."

 

From Captain John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 14 May 1810:

 

            "I have to inform you, that on the Second Instant, Sandy Hook bearing W. by N. Distant about four Miles, I fell in with, and sent into New York for adjudication, the ships Golconda of New York, and Rose of Philadelphia, for a violation of the Non‑Intercourse Law‑‑  The circumstances under which I met with these Ships, were such as made it my duty to send them into Port, to be dealt with as the Law directed, as they were direct from Liverpool, with cargoes (the Manufactures of England) on board; In addition to which, the Rose had no individual paper, to prove the legality of her Voyage, or even to what Nation she belonged, except her Register‑‑  Your will observe, that it was on the 2d of May I detained the above Vessels, consequently as the Law expired on the first of May by its own limitation, it may be decided by the Court authorized to decide on their Cases, that they had not incurred the penalties of the Law: and which I presumed will be the case, should I not be able to prove that they had been within the Jurisdictional limits of the U. States, previous to the day on which I met them.  This, I am in hopes I shall be able to do, not only because I should wish to see those, capable of violating the Law, punished; but on my own personal account as in case of their acquittal, I presumed their owners will bring a suit against me for damages, in consequence of some supposed Injuries they sustained in their Spars and Rigging after  they were detained‑‑  Be the result however what it may, it will not prevent my proceeding in a similar way again, should I be similarly Circumstanced, as the desire of doing my duty with scrupulous tenacity, will always (I hope) outweigh every other Consideration, and should I ever be brought to think differently it alone will be sufficient Cause for my quitting the service in one hour after."

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 14 May 1810:

 

            On the way to Annapolis.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 23 May 1810:

 

            Arrived Annapolis this date with ARGUS and HORNET in company.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 8 Jun 1810:

 

            Intends to proceed to Hampton Roads "tomorrow."

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 9 Jun 1810:

 

            Forwards warrant of Midshipman Marcellin "a Young Man destitute of every principle that constitutes a Gentleman, at the same time a Drunkard‑‑  What gives me most pain is that he is Brother to Lieut Marcellin, who is a very deserving and correct Young Man..."

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, 16 Jun 1810:

 

            Arrived this date at Hampton Roads with ARGUS and HORNET.  Will shift to PRESIDENT "tomorrow," leaving Captain Hull in command of CONSTITUTION, who will be sent to Boston to get a cable for the ship from CHESAPEAKE.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 19 Jun 1810:

 

            Exchanged commands with Captain Hull on the 17th.  Hull has reported ready for sea and been ordered to Boston "with all...dispatch," there to await his arrival.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 20 Jun 1810:

 

            Mentions Marine Lieutenant [P. W.] Winthrop in CONSTITUTION.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 24 Jun 1810:

 

            CONSTITUTION still in sight, struggling aganst adverse  winds to leave Chesapeake Bay.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 27 Jun 1810:

 

            Underway.  Intends to proceed to vicinity of New York with SIREN in company, there to be joined by WASP.  Thence to Boston to be joined by CONSTITUTION, and to patrol as far as Passamaquoddy before returning to Hampton Roads about 15 Jul.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 5 Jul 1810:

 

            Has changed plans and ordered CONSTITUTION to join him in Hampton Roads about 15 Jul.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 9 Jul 1810:

 

            Reports that due to adverse winds and the ship's "dull sailing" he did not arrive off Boston until 6 Jul, and that adverse winds since then have prevented his entering port.  Has informed Commodore Rodgers that he can't be in Hampton Roads on 15 Jul.  Mentions Midshipman Jasper.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 12 Jul 1810:

 

            Reports he has taken Midshipman [Wm B.] Hall into the ship as a replacement for Midshipman Jasper, who will be furloughed at Norfolk, to be Acting Master's Mate.  Also has taken aboard Midshipman [William] Laughton in place of Midshipman Pitt, who reported in a sickly condition and was transferred to CHESAPEAKE.  [Annotated: "All approved."]

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 13 Jul 1810:

 

            Expects to sail "this evening" and hasten to Hampton Roads.  Bottom still requires cleaning, and will attend to that then.  Has taken on board 50,000 gallons of water and 3 months' stores.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 13 Jul 1810:

 

            Has withdrawn Sailing Master [George S.] Wade's warrant and turned him out of the ship.  He had had bad words with the First Lieutenant, [Chas.] Morris, that can't be overlooked or withdrawn.  [Annotated: "I approve highly of Captain Hull's decision."]

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 14 Jul 1810:

 

            Attempted to sail last evening, but wind came ahead and had to anchor in lighthouse channel.  Hopes pilot will be able to warp them out this date.

 

 From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 15 Jul 1810:

 

            Reports that when CONSTITUTION departed Hampton Roads earlier, she had not been able to clear the Capes until 27 Jun.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 22 Jul 1810:

 

            Reports CONSTITUTION in sight, standing into Hampton Roads.  Has exchanged signals with her.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 23 Jul 1810:

 

            CONSTITUTION anchored in the Roads at 4 PM yesterday.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull USS CONSTITUTION, 24 Jul 1810:

 

            Reports that while at Boston he assessed the ship's trim, ballasting, rigging, and every other factor he could think of that might have caused her lack of speed.  He concluded that a "very foul" hull must be the reason.  In calml weather on the voyage south, he put divers over from the ship's boats "and in a very few moments they brought me nearly a bucketfull" of mussels and oysters.  Ten "waggon loads" was estimated.  "The men that were under her bottom described them hanging like bunches of grapes, only much longer...  There were some thousands in each bunch and adhering so closely together that it required some Stength to separate them..."

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Jul 1810:

 

            Reports having furloughed Midshipman [Stephen] Wilson, who is ill with a "not very gentlemanly" disease, and who failed to remedy the situation on a previous furlough "much to the dread of his messmates."  Midshipman Jasper has decided against furlough and will remain in the ship, which pleases Hull as he likes Jasper.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 5 Aug 1810:

 

            Reports getting to sea "this morning" with CONSTITUTION and ARGUS.  The former will proceed immediately to Newcastle, DE, to clean her bottom.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 10 Aug 1810:

 

            Submits muster roll, noting he is short of seamen.  Requests permission to recruit at Philadelphia and elsewhere.  Also need a Sailing Master.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 10 Aug 1810:

 

            Reports he arrived at Newcastle last evening.  Intends moving up to Chester, PA, "this evening."  Midshipmen Tayloe and Hamilton given 10 days' furlough to visit Washington.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 15 Aug 1810:

 

            Reports from off Wilmington that "since the ships arrival in fresh water the mussels on her bottom have all opened, and the inside entirely washed out with the run of the tide, and they are fast falling off‑‑  The oysters I find do not feel the effect of the fresh Water so sensibly, yet I have great hopes that a few days more will cause them to open and fall off in the same manner as the mussels."  Shells are being "scrubbed" off.  Sends a second sample, showing how much larger the animals are than in the first.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 18 Aug 1810:

 

            Reports he decided against going as far up the river as Chester for fear of grounding where UNITED STATES did.  The mussels are almost all gone, but the oysters persist.  Fortunately, they are far less numerous than the mussels.  Divers sent down this day report the copper is rough in places and some of the nails have started.  Will attempt to patch a spot bare of copper up forward.  Expects to depart for New York about the 23rd.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 24 Aug 1810:

 

            Has ordered Lieutenant [James] Biddle from CONSTITUTION to PRESIDENT.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 24 Aug 1810:

 

            Intends to order Gunner William Taylor to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 27 Aug 1810:

 

            Captain Hull reports he thinks he has cleared CONSTITUTION's hull of all the marine growth.  He reports that Hull plans to sail from Newcastle "tomorrow" and cruise for about three weeks; requests permission to put in to New London then.

 

Roll 20 (September 3 ‑ December 31, 1810)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 4 Sep 1810:

 

            "The Constitution arrived off Sandy Hook yesterday, where she will remain until I join her.  She sails (I understand from Capt. Hull) much better since she has been in the Delaware."

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 17 Sep 1810:

 

            "A few days since I had an opportunity of comparing the sailing of the President & Constitution & I think, since the latter has got her bottom cleansed, that she is the fastest sailing Vessel that the President has met with, since I commanded her; indeed, the difference is not very material, altho' the President is decidedly the fastest Ship of the two‑‑"

            "...I was induced to direct Capt. Hull to go into Boston with the Constitution, on the 15th Instant, and to sail again on the 25h for his station off the Delaware..."

            [Annotated: "I am pleased with the performance of the President & the improvement of the Constitution.  P.H."]

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 30 Sep 1810:

 

            Departing Boston.  Intends to proceed to a point east of Georges Bank, then make for the southern end of his patrol ground and then head for New York.  Has furloughed Midshipman [James] Hall to make a merchant voyage and ordered Midshipman [William B.] Reily [sic] in his place.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 9 Oct 1810:

 

            Arrived of Chesapeake Bay on the 6th, and ran in to avoid bad weather.  Sailed this morning to proceed to Delaware Bay and then Sandy Hook.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 12 Oct 1810:

 

            CONSTITUTION arrived off Sandy Hook "last evening."  Hull reports having seen no foreign men of war.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 14 Oct 1810:

 

            Has ordered Midshipman [Nathaniel D.] Nicholson from CONSTITUTION to ENTERPRIZE.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 17 Oct 1810:

 

            Reports the death of CONSTITUTION Midshipman [Richard] Rodgers in a duel with Midshipman [Charles W.] Morgan, who was wounded.  The latter has been arrested while the seconds, Midshipman {Archibald: SecNav's son] Hamilton and Surgeons' Mate [Samuel] Gilliland have been suspended from duty.  As the seconds did all in their power to affect a reconciliation and as all the rules of honor were observed, requests permission to return the three to duty with reprimand.  Rodgers was buried at Sandy Hook.

            Isaac Hull, in his enclosed report of 16 Oct 1810, states that Morgan was wounded in the breast.  [No mention is made of the cause of the duel.]

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 17 Oct 1810 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Sailed from Sandy Hook at 10 this morning with CONSTITUTION.  She has been detached to proceed to Newcastle.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 21 Oct 1810:

 

            Anchored off Newcastle "last evening."  Reports the death of Midshipman [Thomas S.] Sprogle, who fell overboard from the main chains as the ship stood in to Delaware Bay and drowned before help could reach him.  Has no orders from Commodore Rodgers as to how long he is to remain at Newcastle.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 21 Oct 1810 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Reports having discharged John Burnett on 6 Oct upon arrival at Sandy Hook.  Got him a passage ashore in the pilot boat and informed him that his mother was in a "distressed state" and wished him home immediately.  That was his intention; what has happened to him since is unknown.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull USS CONSTITUTION, 29 Oct 1810:

 

            Reports that Midshipman Sprogle could not swim and sank almost immediately ‑‑ a few feet from the life buoy that had been thrown to him.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, to Samuel R. Marshall, n. d.:

 

            Discusses the distribution of prize money for the captures made by Gunboat 98, CONSTITUTION's tender, under the command of Midshipman John H. Elton.  [Elton was attached to CONSTITUTION Jun 1808‑Apr 1809.]

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 8 Nov 1810:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of order to discharge [Private] John Davis.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 9 Nov 1810:

 

            Reports the departure of "Mr. [Midshipman Archibald] Hamilton" on this date.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 10 Nov 1810:

 

            Reports having ordered Captain Hull to New London from Newcastle.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 13 Nov 1810:

 

            Reports receiving a letter for a Midshipman Blair accepting his resignation, but notes that Blair never has been in the ship.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 16 Nov 1810:

 

            Reports having received orders from Commodore Rodgers to proceed to New London.  Intend to move to the mouth of the river "tomorrow" and await a favorable wind.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 28 Nov 1810:

 

            "I have the honour to acquaint you that the Merchant Sloop Income of Rochester (Massachusetts) arrived here yesterday in charge of Midn Riley of the Constitution by whom I received a letter from Capt. Hull informing me of his having fallen in with said Sloop on the 25th Inst., bound to Charleston (& from what I can learn from Mr. Riley, about thirty leagues South East of Block Island) that she had in a Gale two days before lost her Master overboard, and there being no person left on board, capable of navigating her to her destined port, he was induced to put Midn Riley on board with orders to navigate her to this place for the benefit of her owners."

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 Dec 1810:

 

            Reports the loss of Seamen Samuel Francis and Caleb Martin.  Francis fell from the mizzen shrouds, struck the mizzen chains, hit the water, and sank as the ship was coming down the Delaware River.  She was clear of the Delaware Capes and making 8 knots before the wind with all sail set when Martin fell overboard at the bow while helping to stow an anchor.  Life buoys were cut away on both sides, and one was seen to be about five yards from him.  Unfortunately, the strong wind blew the buoy away faster than he could swim, and he drowned.  A subscription was taken for the support of Francis' mother and widow in Philadelphia and an unexpectedly large amount (unspecified) was pledged.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 19 Dec 1810:

 

            Acknowledges recceipt of order to have Captain Hull discharge one Julian Oreille, aka Jean Gaspard.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS PRESIDENT, to Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 17 Dec 1810:

 

            States that Lieutenant [Thomas R.] Swift, in charge of his Marine Guard, reports his men extremely short of proper winter clothing.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 23 Dec 1810:

 

            Reports having ordered Midshipman Charles Fowle, previously ordered to ARGUS by SecNav, to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 27 Dec 1810:

 

            Requests authority to convene a court martial for Seaman John Wilson, who deserted from CONSTITUTION on 1 Feb 1810.  [So ordered.]

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 30 Dec 1810:

 

            States that John Cockeran [sic] was lost overboard from the main topmast head of CONSTITUTION on 10 Sep 1809 when the topmast gave way.

 

Roll 21 (January 1 ‑ May 31, 1811)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 2 Jan 1811:

 

            CONSTITUTION is ready for service except for water, provisions, and some cordage.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 14 Jan 1811:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of authority to court martial John Wilson, a deserter from CONSTITUTION.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 16 Jan 1811:

 

            Reports that CONSTITUTION Sailmaker John Mankins has been furloughed due to ill health.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 8 Feb 1811:

 

            Requests authority to convene a court martial to try Ordinary Seaman Samuel McClarey and Seaman John Loring of CONSTITUTION for mutinous and seditious conduct and disrespect to a superior on the night of 5 Feb 1810 [sic].

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 17 Feb 1811 [enclosure]:

 

"List of Men belonging late to the U. S. Schooner Revenge transferred to the U. S. Frigate Constitution.

 

Name

Rank

Time of Entry

William W. Bogart

O Seaman

July 12th 1809

John Thompson

Q Master

April 2d 1810

John Martin

Seaman

Novr 20th 1810

 Samuel Black

O Seaman

June 13th 1810

Daniel Hogan

O Seaman

Novr 19th 1810

George Abbot

Seaman

April 2d 1810

John Chaplete

O Seaman

March 31st 1810

Luther Bruce

O Seaman

Jany 18th 1810

 

Marines

Rank

Appearance onboard

Bartholemew Dean

Private

Novr 22d 1810

James Jackson

Ditto

March 27 1810

Jacob Smith

ditto

August 24th 1810

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 19 Feb 1811:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of authority to court martial Samuel Mcclarey and John Loring.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, to Commodore John Rodgers, 20 Feb 1811:

 

            Reports a duel between Midshipmen Joseph Brailsford and Charles M. Fowle in which the latter waas wounded in the thigh.  Brailsford, together with the seconds, Midshipmen William Laughton and John Packet, are under arrest aboard ship.  All have been guilty of unofficerlike conduct in the past, and on such occasions have been suspended from duty.  He wishes them ordered from the ship.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 21 Feb 1811:

 

            Reports CONSTITUTION can be ready for sea in four hours.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 24 Feb 1811:

 

            Requests authority to conduct a court martial on Boatswain's Mate John Nease and Seaman John Read of CONSTITUTION on a charge of sedition.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 8 Mar 1811:

 

            Forwards a chart of New London harbor made by Lieutenant Charles Morris, First Lieutenant of CONSTITUTION, which "does him much credit."

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 9 Mar 1811:

 

            Per the Secretary's orders Midshipmen Brailsford and Packett [sic] have been ordered from CONSTITUTION to ARGUS; Midshipmen Fowle and Laughton will be returned to duty.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 9 Mar 1811 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of orders to transfer Charles Cotton, Surgeon's Mate, to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 12 Mar 1811:

 

            "I have the satisfaction to acquaint you that the boats of this Ship & the Constitution yesterday saved the Merchant Brig Harriet (belonging to the house of Pierce & Beach, Merchants of Harford [sic], of this State) from being wrecked, after she had got on a Rock, near the entrance of this harbour, on which at low water, there was three feet less water than she drew, & after she had been on the same twelve hours‑‑  This is the second vessel which our boats have saved from destruction within these foour weeks."

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 16 Mar 1811:

 

            Reports the death of Midshipman Brailsford on the 15th ffrom the wound suffered in a duel.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 16 Mar 1811 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Has authorized Captain Hull to furlough Midshipman [William] Jasper for the purpose of making a merchant voyage.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 19 Mar 1811:

 

            CONSTITUTION will leave for Boston "immediately."  As about 150 of her men are shortly due discharge, Captain Hull is to open a rendezvous to recruit their replacements.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 20 Mar 1811:

 

            Has discharged John Barley per orders.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 27 Mar 1811:

 

            Arrived Boston this date.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 29 Mar 1811:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of authority to court martial Boatswain's Mate Nease and Seaman Read of CONSTITUTION, both of whom are now confined in PRESIDENT.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 30 Mar 1811:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of orders placing ARGUS, a smaller ship, in Delaware Bay instead of CONSTITUTION.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS PRESIDENT, 6 Apr 1811:

 

            "I yesterday received a letter from Capt Hull, dated the 2nd Inst. informing that he had seized the American ship Lothaire for supposed violation of the Non Intercourse Law; she having sailed from Liverpool, with a cargo of British Manufactures, since the 2d of February 1811; altho' she had previous to that date cleared out for Boston‑‑  I have this moment received a second letter from Capt Hull informing me of his having released the Lothaire in consequence of the opinion of Mr. Blake (District Attorney)..."

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 8 May 1811:

 

            Intends sailing for Annapolis on the 13th.  Recruiting has been insufficient to make up loss of nearly 100 of crew.  Will want about 30 able seamen.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 14 May 1811:

 

            Awaiting a fair wind.  Has stationed Marines at the great guns to make up for his deficiency in seamen.  [Annotated: "disapproved."]

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 15 May 1811:

 

            Heading for sea.  One 22" anchor cable found rotten and surveyed; another required before going on extended service.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 24 May 1811:

 

            Reports arrival at Annapolis this date.  Mentions Purser Garretson.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 26 May 1811:

 

            Mentions Midshipman Beatty.

 

Roll 22 (June 1 ‑ December 31, 1811)

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 Jun 1811:

 

            Joined the ship on "Monday evening."

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 4 Jun 1811:

 

            Ship ready for sea on short notice.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 21 Jun 1811 [1st ltr of that date]:

 

            Will discharge Benjamin Bowie as soon as the Purser joins the ship.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 21 Jun 1811 [2nd ltr of that date]:

 

            "... The two Englishmen and several of the Frenchmen, being seamen and the remainder good ordinary seamen will make a great difference in the strength of the crew.  When they are discharged or turned over from this ship ‑‑ may I therefore be permitted to request that you will be pleased to order that same number of men may be ordered to the ship to fill their places..."

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 21 Jun 1811 [3rd ltr of that date]:

 

            Recommends hospitalization for Nicholas Hall ("a state of extreme debility"), Thomas Blenock ("a white swelling of the knee"), John Thomson from the REVENGE (a fistula requiring surgery), and Ed Lund and Antonio Mitchell (old men with urinary tract problems).

 

Appended list:

 

Charles Oliver

--

Lewis Basson

Frenchmen and

Nicholas Abberville

ordinary seamen

Thomas Wallager

--

Peter Marshal

--l

 

Peter F. Goodman

Frenchmen and

Anthony Carbon

Seamen

 

Peter Carr

Englishmen and

Robert Jamieson

Seamen

 

Nicholas Hall

Sick and proper objects to be

Thos Blennock

discharged from service

John Thompson

--

Edward Lund

--

Antonio Mitchell

--

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 26 Jun 1811:

 

            Requests court martial for Quartermaster Thomas McCumber on charges of "mutinous conduct and disrespect" and "mutinous and seditious language."

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS COMSTITUTION, 27 Jun 1811:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of SecNav's response to his [3rd] letter of 21 Jun.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 30 Jun 1811:

 

            Requests permission to carry flour and make bread as he needs it.  Says one barrel of flour will make three of bread.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 8 Jul 1811:

 

            Requests an expert opinion on the legality of the shipping articles signed by Quartermaster Thomas McCumber, currently on trial.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 8 Jul 1811:

 

            Reports that he has received Midshipman Baury on board, a young man who speaks French and has knowledge of European ports; also Midshipmen Pierpoint, Barlow, and Haslett.  Midshipman Phelps expected "to day."  Midshipman Duncan has left the ship, having resigned.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 10 Jul 1811:

 

            Reports he has directed the local Navy Agent to advance Midshipman Joseph L. Biggs $30 so he can comply with orders to report to Philadelphia.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 14 Jul 1811:

 

            Acknowledges orders to discharge Frederick Lubstein.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Jul 1811:

 

            "I have the honor to inform you that I have this day, made known to that part of the crew of the Constitution under my command (whose term of service expires on the 12th of Sept. next) that they have a choice, either to remain by the ship until she returns from Europe, or to be turned over to other vessels to serve the remainder of their time.

            "In doing so I made use of every argument calculated to induce them to remain but to no effect, as they chose every man but one to be turned over..."  Requests that ships to which these men are sent be ordered to send him similarly skilled men in return.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 28 Jul 1811:

 

        Reports men exchanged with HORNET and WASP.  He is ready for sea except for "Mr. Barlow."

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 29 Jul 1811:

 

        Reports finding smallpox in a Marine recently received from the Washington barracks.  Has found there are 39 people aboard who have never had it and is taking steps to isolate them.  Vaccinations are being done.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 31 Jul 1811:

 

        Has given Gunner Currie [Correia], "a foreigner," leave of absence as he has "made himself very unpopular with the officers and crew generally."  Recommends his discharge; neither Hull nor Commodore Rodgers think him fit.  Gunner's Mate Robert Anderson, who has been in the ship two years, has been appointed Acting Gunner.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 2 Aug 1811:

 

        Reports Mr. Barlow's arrival "late on Wednesday evening."

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 5 Aug 1811:

 

        Arrived in Hampton Roads on 2 Aug.  Encloses supplementary muster list for men exchanged with ESSEX and NAUTILUS.  "he crew is now very healthy, and the men vaccinated for kine pox, are doing well..."

 

"List of Men received on board the United States Frigate Constitution from the U. S. Frigate Essex ‑‑

 

Names

--

Names

--

George Wilson

QrMr

John Clark

Sea

Benj Kemble

QrMr

John Burnett

Sea

Chas Harrington

QrMr

John Melon

Sea

Thos Griffin

Sea

Wm Mains

Sea

Wm Ward

Sea

Collin Frazier

Sea

John Dickerson

Sea

Isaac Daggett

Sea

Saml Wilson

Sea

Edwd Philips

Sea

Robert Brice Sea Wm Coleman  
Jas Burrell Sea Hugh Furguson  

Jas Lannon

Sea

John Rice 2d

Sea

John Oliver

Sea

John Mitchell 2d

Sea

Stephen Webb

Sea

David Biggs

Sea

Isaac Hingman

Sea

John Porter

Sea

Jacob Sago

Sea

Richd Gray

QrGr

Henry Ludowick

Sea

Christopher Kelly

OSea

John Arnold

Sea

William Cooper

OSea

Christopher Dyson

Sea

Arthurton Arnold

OSea

Wm Olive

Sea

Wm Blake

OSea

John Allan

Sea

Geo Gilbert

OSea

John Hyatt

Sea

Saml Smith

OSea

John Taube

Sea

John Cockburn

OSea

Benj Colly

Sea

John Jackson

OSea

Geo Parsons

Sea

Chas Bull

OSea

Saml Stone

Sea

Danl Eakel

OSea

Peter Alkhurst

Sea

Thos Murray

OSea

Jas Shadden

OSea

Jno Thompson

OSea

Benj Smith OSea Geo Davis OSea

Jno Owen

OSea

Dennis Fundehider

OSea

Tobias Humphries

‑‑

Lolltwist

‑‑

 

"Received from the U. S. Brig Nautilus

 

Richd White

Carp

John Russel [sic]

Sea

Absolum [sic] Lewis

Sea

Joshua Crosby

Sea

John Fullington

OSea

Geo Lymmire

OSea

Geo Walton

OSea

Henry Waterhaus

OSea

Lewis Prescott

OSea

Simeon Charge

OSea

Edwd Pallett

OSea

Geo Thompson

Boy

Thomas Johnson 1st

Boy

--

--

 

"List of Men Sent from the U. S. Frigate Constitution to the United States Frigate Essex & Brig Nautilus ‑‑

 

James Marshall

QrGr

Jona [sic] Colyer

OSea

James Heady

QrGr

Wm Thomas

OSea

Stephen Natterville

QrGr

Edwd Highly

OSea

John Williams

QrGr

John S. Smith

OSea

Wm Gardiner

QrMr

John Bruneaux

OSea

Hyman Perry

QrMr

Saml Brigham

OSea

James Smith

QrMr

Wm Holland

OSea

Jno C Emming

Sea

Henry Cassady

OSea

David Mirlon

Sea

Geo McDonald

OSea

Wm Cassin

Sea

Jno Schroder

OSea

Roger O'Boyle

Sea

 Jona [sic] Robinson

OSea

Samuel Hall

Sea

Jno Chapman

OSea

Michael Noland

Sea

Edwd Manning

OSea

Jno M Howard

Sea

Philip Tully

OSea

George Wine

Sea

Enoch Wilson

OSea

Robert James

Sea

Michael Finny

OSea

Joseph Griffiths

Sea

James Wood

OSea

Joseph Tharp

Sea

James Riker

OSea

Thos McCumber, by

OSea

John Ginger

OSea

sentence of a

 

Saml Madison

OSea

Court Martial

 

James Lighton

OSea

Saml Williams

OSea

Jno Haviland

OSea

Joseph Robinson

OSea

Jno Thomas

OSea

Jacob Fifer

OSea

Jacob Ducher

OSea

Jno Watson

OSea

Jno Wyble

OSea

Elisha Boiss

OSea

Alfred Maim

OSea

Paul Chadwick

OSea

Saml Humphries

OSea

John Stackpole

OSea

John Mills

OSea

Edwd Stephens

OSea

Thomas Lewis

OSea

Thos Harding

OSea

Geo Ross

OSea

Wm Hynes

OSea

Danl Gardiner

OSea

John Anderson

OSea

Arthur O. Tone

OSea

Joseph Wilson

OSea

Michael Wine

OSea

Saml Moore

OSea

Jona [sic] Barry

OSea

Saml Miller

OSea

Jas McLaughlin

OSea

Robt McKittrick OSea Henry Munroe OSea

 Francis Greene

OSea

 John Browers

OSea

Robt French

ASlMkr

David Weaser

CpMt

Hugh Dougherty

Cpr

Ellery Allen

Stwd

Thomas Scofield

Boy

Thomas Gibbs

Boy

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 16 Sep 1811:

 

            Reports his arrival at Cherbourg after a 30 day passage.  Mr. Barlow landed immediately.  Headed for Den Helder 4 days later, but has been troubled by adverse winds.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 Oct 1811:

 

            Reports arrival off Deal the previous evening after a difficult time at Texel, navigationally and diplomatically.  Additonally, a gale forced him offshore for five days.  A second bad blow decided him to make for Deal.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 4 Oct 1811:

 

            Getting underway from Deal for Cherbourg, but weather again making things difficult.  Sir James Jay and "Judge Thompson" on board with dispatches for Mr. Barlow.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 19 Nov 1811:

 

            Left the Downs (Deal) on 9 Oct and arrived at Cherbourg on the 14th.  Arrived at Portsmouth, England on 11 Nov.  Has taken aboard 18 American seamen "in distress" for return to the US; expects there will be more.  Expects it will be late December before he can leave France with the Minister's dispatches.

 

Roll 23 (January 1 ‑ May 31, 1812)

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 20 Feb 1812:

 

            Reports giving Midshipman [Frederick S.] Gibbon leave of absence to go to Richmond because his mother has died.  Mr. [Octavius A.] Page's mother also has died, and Mr. [William D.] Salter has lost both parents.  Please advise on leaves for them.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 22 Feb 1812:

 

            I have given Midshipman [Lewis S.] Germaine permission to visit his father at Washington, taking with him a trunk of papers for the State Department and a packet of papers for the French Minister.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 23 Feb 1812:

 

            "In giving you an account of the state and condition of the Ship I fear much at a loss what to say of her.  The upper works has evident marks of decay yet if the copper was good on her bottom I should have no fear in runing [sic] her Two years longer on summer service, but that is not the case the [sic] copper is fast coming off so that She Sails dull and will not be fit to cruise until she is hove out and whilst that is doing it would be a pitty [sic] that her upper works should be left in a state that they would cause her to be laid up again in a year or Two to repair them.  And on the other hand it would be a pity to take her to Pieces and loose [sic] the year or Two of Service that the upper works would bore [sic] ‑‑  All her sails except Three Topsails and one Foresail are b[?] indeed so much so that they are only fit for old canvas ‑‑ nearly all the [?] rigging is bad and must be replaced with new.  Many of her Spars are bad and those that are not are much too heavy ‑ her Cables will answer for the next [?] but not longer ‑ her Powder must be Taken out and proved.  grates that [?] prepared [?] where she will best [?].  These repairs I Submit to you considering I am told that There is no Vessel now at Newyork [sic] under repairs if so would not that be the best place for doing it and for mooring (?) her after it is done or as she is here have She might be soon got up to Washington by leaving her lower deck guns here and other heavy stores and let Her be repaired where she will I should recommend having all her Sails made at the yard at Washington ‑ in taking her there the small crew that She will have would answer but it would not be safe to Venture to Newyork [sic] with them and it will take some time to recruit the number that She will be short of Complement ‑ when you shall have determined what to do with her I shall be pleased to be [?] with your wishes as soon as Possable [sic] that none of the Season may be lost in geting [sic] her to Whatever place you may fix on.

            "We are much in want of Money to Pay the Men whose time are out they have been some months over their Time some of them which makes them uneasy to get ashore ‑‑  i am now making them as comfortable as possable [sic] is fast recovering both onboard and at the sick quarters."

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 1 Mar 1812 [1st ltr of this date]:

 

            Reports having given 10 day leaves of absence to Midshipmen [Octavius A.] Page and [William L.] Gordon, both to visit Richmond.  Intends to begin caulking the ship.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 1 Mar 1812 [2nd ltr of this date]:

 

            Requests permission to come to Washington to visit his uncle, Governor William Hull, whom he hasn't seen in years and who will be in town.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 4 Mar 1812:

 

            Reports the crew continues sickly.  Lost one man "yesterday" and another "this morning."  Midshipman [William] Laughton is "very ill" and cannot be moved; Midshipman [A. H. M.] Conklin also ill.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 5 Mar 1812:

 

            Reports having moved as many sick crewmen to the sick quarters as can be accommodated; hopes to get the rest into the town hospital.  Discharged 40‑70 men "yesterday."  With the loss of additional men, whose time is about up, the ship will be too shorthanded to go to sea.  Suggests it would quickest to overhaul the ship at Norfolk.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 12 Mar 1812:

 

            Reports that the men he lately discharged "have principally gone to Newyork [sic] and Boston."

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 13 Mar 1812:

 

                Crew is mending well.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUION, 28 Mar 1812:

 

            Anchored off Blanton's "this morning" as the ship draws too much to cross the shoal.  Awaits the lighters from Washington.

 

From Captain Thomas Tingey, Washington Navy Yard, 20 Apr 1812:

 

            Expects to have little heavy copper sheathing in stock after completing CONSTITUTION.  Currently has 14,352 lbs of 28, 30, and 32 ounce copper sheets on hand.

 

From Captain William Bainbridge, Charlestown Navy Yard, 21 Apr 1812:

 

            Requests that CARP Rodgers of CONSTITUTION be ordered to duty at his Yard.  [Rodgers not assigned to CONSTITUTION.]

 

From Captain Thomas Tingey, Washington Navy Yard, 25 Apr 1812:

 

            Requires 120 bolts of #5 British canvas, 50 bolts of #6, and 50 bolts of Raven's duck for CONSTITUTION's sails.

 

From Captain William Bainbridge, Charlestown Navy Yard, 21 May 1812:

 

"A List of Articles taken from the Navy Store, belonging to the Chesapeake, for the use of the U. S. Frigate Constitution, ‑‑ July 11th & 28 Septr 1810. ‑‑ April 16th & May 10th, 1811.

 

  3 Cable of 20" each

10 Lanthorns

  1 Messenger 12"

30 yds flannell

 17 fthm Bolt Rope

4 lb 11 oz seizing thread

121 fathm 2" Rope

2 lb Emery

 13 Do. Ratline Stuff

7 1/4 lb Salt Petre

  2 Barrels Varnish

10 lb Black lead

 19 Blocks different sizes

5 lb Spiller fodder [?]

 30 lbs Twine

10 Quires Log Paper

  2 Leather hoses

1 Piece Brass conductor

  2 1/2 Hour Glasses

8 Hanks Log Line

  8 Second Glasses

5 Doz skeins Marline

  4 Hanks Lead Line

3 Do.  do. House Line

  9 Sheets Lanthorn Horn

4 28 Second Glasses

 70 Wadds [sic]

4 14 Second Glasses

 10 Augers

9 hanks White line

  9 Plain Irons

1/2 Coil Dipsee [sic] Line

  3 Chissels

1 Coil 12 thd line of Signal Halyds

  2 Caulking Irons

6 Planes

  2 Malls [sic]

1 Heart

  1 Broad Ax

1 Main Sail ( new)

  1 Adze

1 Main Top Sail(/ new)

  1 Drawing Knife

4 Peices Copper [sic]

  1 Dozn Carb Steel files

Bolts 43 lb

 26 Sheets Sand Paper  

 

Roll 24 (June 1 ‑ August 31, 1812)

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 27 Jun 1812:

 

            "...this moment anchored in...Annapolis...  ...the upper deck guns on board only two days...  ...upwards of forty sick on board."

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 20 Jul 1812:

 

            Written off Nantucket, reporting chase and intention to call at Boston for orders, then "cruising in the Bay" until they are received.  Letter sent ashore by pilot boat.

 

Roll 25 (September 1 ‑ December 31, 1812)

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, USS CONSTITUTION, 1 Sep 1812:

 

            Reports the death of brother and requests relief from command as speedily as possible.  Prisoners have been offloaded.

 

From Captain William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 2 Sep 1812:

 

            Asks for command of CONSTITUTION.

 

From Captain William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 13 Sep 1812:

 

            Survey report on CONSTITUTION: fore and main masts shot through and ought properly to be replaced; rigging and sails much cut up, but repairable; stern of ship "considerable shott," but repairable.

 

Roll 26 (January 3 ‑ February 28, 1813)

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, USS CONSTITUTION, 21 Feb 1813:

 

        Anchored off Boston Navy Yard, being stripped.  New coppering needed, and deck beams, decking, waterways, and some knees.

 

Roll 27 (March 1 ‑ April 15, 1813)

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, USS CONSTITUTION, 5 Mar 1813:

 

            Surgeon Amos Evans transferred to Boston Navy Yard and Acting Surgeon Benjamin Kissem sent on board the ship temporarily.

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, USS CONSTITUTION, 14 Mar 1813:

 

            The gun deck has been ripped out; 2/3 of beams require replacement.  Difficult to get southern pine for decking.

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, USS CONSTITUTION, 16 Mar 1813:

 

            Notes that Lieutenant John Contie [sic], USMC, was aboard for both actions to date.

 

Roll 28 (April 16 ‑ May 31, 1813)

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, USS CONSTITUTION, 18 Apr 1813:

 

            Reports sending 100 of the crew to serve on the Lakes, as local recruitment for that service has failed completely.  Most of the remaining crew have been discharged as their enlistments have ended.

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, USS CONSTITUTION, 27 Apr 1813:

 

            This date transferred 50 more from CONSTITUTION to Sackett's Harbor.

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, USS CONSTITUTION, 3 May 1813:

 

            Beams for the gun deck still are wanted.

 

From Commodore Isaac Chauncey, Sackett's Harbor, NY, 16 May 1813:

 

            147 very fine seamen arrived from Commodore Bainbridge prior to 11 May; 50 of these will be sent on to Perry on Lake Erie.

 

Roll 29 (June 1 ‑ July 15, 1813)

 

From Commodore Isaac Chauncey, Sackett's Harbor, NY, 4 Jun 1813:

 

            Bainbridge sent 150 of CONSTITUTION's crew "otherwise could not have man'd our present fleet."

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, USS CONSTITUTION, 22 Jun 1813:

 

            Captain Charles Stewart arrived this date.  The ship is ready to heave out for recoppering.

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 27 Jun 1813:

 

            Purser [Robert] Pottinger transferred from SIREN to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Commodore Isaac Chauncey, Sackett's Harbor, NY, 1 Jul 1813:

 

            Received this date another 94 men from Boston.

 

Roll 30 (July 16 ‑ August 31, 1813)

 

From Captain Thomas Tingey, Washington Navy Yard, 28 Aug 1813:

 

            "I...enclose here with a statement of the number of rounds of shot of the different qualities taken on board...of the public ships which have been fitted out here.  The number of shot has been chiefly at the will of the captains...  But in submitting my opinion, I beg to recommend that for every long gun mounted on board our ships of war, the complement of shot should be 100 to 120 rounds of round shot, 50 to 60 round [sic] of grape shot and 20 to 25 rounds of cannister.  For every carronade, 80 to 90 rounds of round shot, 30 to 40 round [sic] of grape, and 10 to 15 rounds of cannister...

            "Each stand of grape has heretofore generally, one iron stool and twelve round shot and this practice should be continued for proper proportioned long gun the stool and shot constructed as to weigh fully the denomination of the piece intended for.  But for carronades I would recommend only eight balls and the stools to be made of wood...  My reason is that in consequence of the light charge of powder...to a carronade they heavy iron stool will be very much...the velocity of the shot and...cause these to fall short of the distance intended and of there [sic] effective force...  The Constitution fired from her carronades two round shot each discharge during the entire battle with the Guerriere."

 

Roll 31 (September 1 ‑ October 15, 1813)

 

From Captain Thomas Tingey, Washington Navy Yard, to an unknown addressee, date obscured:

 

"The following is established by the department.  1rst Sept. 1813.

        "For long guns     100 rounds of round shot

                                        40   do.     grape  do.

                                    #   5   do.   double head

                                    No cannister

        "For carronades     60   do.     round shot

                                    40   do.     grape  do.

                                    20   do.     cannister

"All grape to be made with iron stools, containing twelve shot the whole to weigh the weight of the round shot as near as may be.

"# This did great execution against the Guerriere, the enemy complain much of their effect.  One doublehead shot cut her foremast about one third off."

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 15 Sep 1813:

 

            The ship has been ready for sea "for some time," but is 60 hands short.

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 24 Sep 1813:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of the ship's sailing orders dated 18 Sep.

 

 From Commodore William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 25 Sep 1813:

 

            The ship needs about 50 seamen; recruiting very slow.

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 7 Oct 1813:

 

            Reports Sailing Master Hixon and Acting Midshipman Stearns in the ship.

 

Roll 32 (October 16 ‑ November 30, 1813)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 33 (December 1 ‑ 31, 1813)

 

From Captain Charles Stewart, USS CONSTITUTION, 5 Dec 1813:

 

            "I have constructed a portable sheet iron furnace for heating red hot shot of the following dimentions [sic] which would answer as well for land service as sea service‑‑  Lenth [sic] 3 feet depth 3 feet width 18 inches, it heated 21 shot 24 lbs. in 22 minutes with a pine wood fire.  The construction of the pipe is such as gives it a great draught.  from its dimentions [sic] you can readily conceive it occupies little room, and is calculated to set to the back part of our Galley where it interferes with nothing‑‑  My purpose is only to use it against the enemys [sic] ships of such force as would render our safety precarious, (if we cannot otherwise escape,) by bringing them under out stern battery and firing a few red hot ball in their hull.  They are not very expensive and all our frigates haveing [sic] them, the use of which might facilitate their escape from a superior force by the confusion they would be thrown into, if not the destruction of an enemy that is not disposed to contend with us on fair and equal terms."

 

From Captain Charles Stewart, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Dec 1813:

 

            "Herewith you will receive a model of the furnace for heating red hot shots.  The fronts [sic] of tin are to be made of thick sheat [sic]‑iron riveted together as the dots represent, the grates of strong bar‑iron which is represented by wood, the pan of tin goes under to received the ashes and coals that fall.  The construction of the drauft [sic] pipe is the most important.

            "This model is made on a scale of one and a half inches to the foot and represents exactly the one made for the Ship.  The shot is placed on the upper grate and the fire wood on the lower.  They are verry [sic] portable and would answer for Gunboats.  The season has been so uncommonly mild that I have not yet been able to make my escape from the force that is watching us, but I hope a few day [sic] will bring a more easterly wind and enable us to do so without much risque of meeting them.  On Sunday last the Raze [sic: razee] and Junon frigate was off Cape Ann, and under Cape Cod a 74‑gun ship and two Frigates were at anchor, with two or three Brigs of war cruizing betwene [sic] the capes."

 

Roll 34 (January 1 ‑ February 28, 1814)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 35 (March 1 ‑ April 30, 1814)

 

From Captain Charles Stewart, USS CONSTITUTION, 4 Apr 1814:

 

            "We closely pressed his Majesty's brig of war Musquito [sic] off Surinam, where she escaped by running in the mud...  ...scorbutic symptoms began to make their appearance..."  He chose to return to the US to repair/replace the mast so that, if blockaded, the crew would be available for other service.

 

From Captain Charles Stewart, USS CONSTITUTION, 5 Apr 1814:

 

            Notes that Midshipmen [John] Tayloe and [Richard] Winter were on the previous cruise.

 

From Captain Charles Stewart, USS CONSTITUTION, 18 Apr 1814:

 

            Reports the shift of the Ship from Salem to Boston the previous day.

 

Roll 36 (May 2 ‑ 31, 1814)

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 2 May 1814:

 

            Reports the arrival of Oliver Hazard Perry to chair Court of Inquiry ordered on Stewart by SecNav on 21 Apr.  Will "convene tomorrow."

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 9 May 1814:

 

            Reports end of Court of Inquiry.  Notes that CONSTITUTION almost was fired upon by Marblehead fort while making her escape from the British frigates: only the chance presence of a visitor who recognized her saved the day.  Signals between sea and land forces are strongly recommended.

 

From Captain Charles Stewart, USS CONSTITUTION, 29 May 1814:

 

            Reports 30 men short, including a Gunner; 25 more are due for discharge in June.

 

Roll 37 (June 1 ‑ July 15, 1814)

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 1 Jul 1814:

 

            The ship needs 60‑70 men.  Blockade is tight.  Recruiting is nil due to the bounty being offered for Lakes service and the lure of privateers.

 

Roll 38 (July 16 ‑ August 30, 1814)

 

From Captain Charles Stewart, USS CONSTITUTION, 9 Aug 1814:

 

            Forwards the flag captured in HMS PICTOU.

 

From Captain Charles Stewart, USS CONSTITUTION, 10 Aug 1814:

 

            "Will you do me the favour to order to this ship three or four of those octagon swivel guns with the necessary aparatus [sic]; the decided advantage they possess make me desirous to have them on board."

 

Roll 39 (September 1 ‑ October 1, 1814)

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 25 Sep 1814:

 

            Recruiting is improving.  The ship may be ready in 2‑3 weeks.

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 26 Sep 1814:

 

            Forwards following letter from Mr. William Flagg, Salem, MA, 25 Sep 1814:

 

            "The proprietors of the Private armed schooner Fox, have an ordnance ship in this Port with sixty six 24 pound Cannon on the Congreve principles, Thirty of which have ship carriages with apparatus complete.  Should the Government want these for immediate service, I have no doubt but the Proprietors would consent to an appraisement.  There is [sic] 3000 Round - & a quantity of Grape and Canister Shot - quantity not yet known.."

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, Portsmouth (NH) Navy Yard, 27 Sep. 1814:

 

            Forwards a list of the ordanance captured by the Portsmouth privateer Fox in Stranger.  It is the entire armament for 2 frigates then building at Kingston, Jamaica.  As the only heavy guns now in the area are those due to be returned to Congress, requests authority to purchase them.

 

 

Roll 40 (October 1 ‑ November 16, 1814)

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, Portsmouth (NH) Navy Yard, 1 Oct 1814:

 

            Reports that the owners of privateer Fox have offered ths guns captured by her to the Government.  So confident is he that they will be purchased, he has ordered "a complete set for the upper deck" of Washington.  The guns will be considered "borrowed" until the Secretary confirms purchase.  Washington will be launched at noon this date.

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 3 Oct 1814:

 

            Reports his inspection of the cargo of the prize Stranger.  Recommends purchase of the 24 pdr Congreve cannon, shot, and associated implements, but not the carriages "which are not worth purchasing."  The canon are 7'5" long, with "large breeches and trunnions located farther aft than is customary," and weighing an average 40 cwt 3 qtrs.  They were cast at Carron.  Also recommends purchase of the swords, gunlocks, rope rammer/sponges, and blankets found in the prize.

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 11 Oct 1814:

 

            "By letter this day received from Mr. Chambers of Philadelphia, he informed me that there are at that place, about 20 repeating swivels unappropriated‑‑  Pray, sir, will you be pleased to order ten of them to this place for the Independence and Constitution."

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 20 Oct 1814:

 

            CONSTITUTION has a greater shortage of ordinary seamen than she has excess of able bodied seamen.  Her crew as of 16 Oct:

 

  

    1 Captain

1 Gunner

1 Sailmaker's Mate

    5 Lieutenants

1 Boatswain

2 Yeomen

    1 Master

1 Carpenter

1 Master at Arms

    1 Surgeon

1 Sailmaker

1 Steward

    1 Chaplain

1 Cooper

15 Quarter Gunners

    1 Purser

1 Armorer

10 Quartermasters

   16 Midshipmen

1 Coxswain

218 AB Seamen

    2 Surgeon's Mates

1 Cook

92 Ordinary Seamen

    1 Captain's Clerk

2 Boatswain's Mates

12 Boys

    3 Master's Mates

2 Carpenter's Mates

44 Marines

 

                    Total: 440

 

From Captain Charles Stewart, USS CONSTITUTION, 22 Oct 1814:

 

            References made to Midshipman [Z. W.] Nixon, [Lott L.] Payne [dismissed for misconduct], [William] Steele, Curtis, and [Charles P.] Derby; as well as Lieutenants John Tayloe and Richard M. Hunter, and Surgeon John A. Kearney.

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 25 Oct 1814:

 

            The ship's batteries are 22 32‑pounder carronades; 30 24‑pounder long guns.  "...house is built over spar deck..  ...most of her...spars unfit for service..."

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 4 Nov 1814:

 

            Reports 20 men have deserted in recent days from the Yard and INDEPENDENCE.  Midshipman [Henry] Ward, one of the officers sent looking for them, found John Baptiste on the privateer LEO of Boston.  The Captain of LEO, John H. Hewes, knew the man was a deserter but refused to give him up.  Captain Stewart ordered to send armed boats to LEO and take the man by force, if necessary.  When one boat went alongside LEO and identified itself, the privateer's Second Lieutenant, John D. Carnes, refused to allow any boarding.  CONSTITUTION's men tried, but were repulsed with several "severely wounded."  After a parley, Lieutenant Henry E. Ballard was allowed on board, where he was abused verbally by Hewes and his First Lieutenant, George D. Mack, before they finally delivered up Baptiste.  [Bainbridge sought a court martial on the privateer officers, but it turned out that they did not receive the ship's letter of marque until the day after the incident, and so were not liable to the Articles of War.  Baptiste was court martialled.]

 

Roll 41 (November 16 ‑ December 31, 1814)

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 11 Dec 1814:

 

            Reports that the ship's orders, dated 30 Nov, arrived on 8 Dec.  A shortage of funds is delaying the purchase of supplies.

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 17 Dec 1814:

 

            The ship sailed this date.

 

Roll 42 (January 1 ‑ February 27, 1815)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 43 (March 1 ‑ 31, 1815)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 44 (April 1 ‑ May 31, 1815)

 

From Captain Charles Stewart, USS CONSTITUTION, 15 May 1815:

 

            Reports arrival in New York this date.

 

From Captain Charles Stewart, USS CONSTITUTION, [?] May 1815:

 

            Reporting events, notes that Madeira bore WSW 60 leagues when he engaged CYANE and LEVANT, and that the Porto Praya chase occurred on a Sunday.

 

[Enclosure]

 

            "Commences with light breezes from the Ed and cloudy weather‑  At 1 discovered a sail two points on the larboard bow‑ hauled up and made sail in chace [sic]‑ at 1/4 past 1 made the sail to be a ship‑ at 3/4 past 1 discovered another sail ahead‑ made them out a [sic] 2 to be both ships, standing close hauled, with their starboard tacks aboard.  At 4 p.m. the weathermost ship made signals and bore up for her consort, then about ten miles to leeward‑ [we] bore up after her, and set, lower, topmast, topgallant, and royal studding sails in chace‑ at 1/2 past 4 carried away our main royal mast‑ took in the sails and got another prepared.  At 5 p.m. commenced firing on the chace from our two larboard bow guns‑ our shot falling short, ceased firing‑  At 1/2 past 5, finding it impossible to prevent their junction, cleared ship for action, then about 4 miles from the 2 ships‑ at 10 minutes after 5, they passed within hail of each other, and hauled by the wind on the starboard tack, hauled up their courses and prepared to receive us‑ at 45 past 5, they made all sail close hauled by the wind, in hopes of getting to windward of us‑ at 55 minutes past 5, finding themselves disappointed in their object, and we were closing with them fast, they shortened sail and formed on a line of wind about half a cables length from each other.  At 6 pm having them under command of our battery, hoisted our colours [sic], which were answered [by] both ships hoisting English Ensigns.  At 5 minutes past 6 ranged up on the starboard side of the sternmost ship, about 300 yards distant and commenced the action by broadsides, both ships returning our fire with great spirit for about 15 minutes,‑ then the fire of the enemy beginning to slacken and the great column of smoake [sic] collected under our lee induced us to cease fire to ascertain their positions and conditions.‑ in about 3 minutes, the smoke cleared away, we found our selves abreast of the headmost ship, the sternmost ship luffing up for our larboard quarter‑ we poured a brodside [sic] into the headmost ship, and then braced aback our Main and Mizen Topsails, and backed astern under cover of the smoake, abreast the sternmost ship, when the action was continued with great [crossed out in the original] spirit and considerable effect, until 35 minutes past 6 when the enemy's fire again slackened and we discovered the headmost ship bearing up.‑ furlled our topsails ‑ shot ahead, and gave her two stern rakes  we then discovered the sternmost ship wearing also wore ship immediately after her, and gave her a stern rake, she luffing too [sic] on our starboard bows, and giving us her larboard broadside  we ranged up on her larboard quarter within hail, and was about to give her our starboard broadside when she struck her colours, fired a lee gun, and yielded./[sic]  At 50 minutes past 6, took possession of H.M. Ship Cyane, captain Gordon Falcon, mounting 34 guns./  At 8 pm filled away after her consort which was still in sight to leeward  at 1/2 past 8 found her standing towards us, with her starboard tacks close hauled, with top gallant sail set, and colours flying  at 50 minutes past 8 ranged close along to windward of her, on opposite tacks, and exchanged broadsides  wore immediately under stern and raked her with a broadside, she then crowded all sail, and endeavoured escape by running  hauled on board our tacks, set spanker [and] flying jib in chace  at 1/2 past 9 commenced firing on her from our starboard bow chaser  gave her several shot, which cut spars and rigging considerably‑ at 10 pm finding they could not escape, fired a gun, struck her colours, and  yielded  We immediately took possession of H.M. Ship Levant, Honorable captain George Douglas, mounting 21 guns  1 am the damages of our rigging was repaired, sails shifted and the ship in  fighting condition.

 

From Captain Charles Stewart, USS CONSTITUTION, 22 May 1815:

 

            Will sail for Boston on first fair wind.

 

From Captain Samuel Evans, New York Navy Yard, 24 May 1815:

 

            CONSTITUTION sailed this morning.

 

Roll 45 (June 1 ‑ August 31, 1815)

 

From Lieutenant William B. Shubrick to Captain Charles Stewart, USS CONSTITUTION, 1 Jun 1815:

 

            Indicates the ship has been in Boston at least since preceding day.

 

From Captain Charles Stewart, USS CONSTITUTION, 2 Jun 1815:

 

            In Boston.  Mentions Midshipman Alexander W. Lufborough.

 

From Captain Charles Stewart, USS CONSTITUTION, 16 Jun 1815:

 

            Requests to be relieved of command to attend to family matters.

 

Roll 46 (September 1 ‑ October 30, 1815)

 

From Surgeon John A. Kearney to Lieutenant William B. Shubrick, both USS CONSTITUTION, 2 Sep 1815:

 

            Mentions Midshipman Arthur Latimer.  Shubrick is termed "commanding officer."

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, Boston Navy Yard, 8 Sep 1815:

 

            Mentions Midshipman Delaney in ship.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, Boston Navy Yard, 19 Sep 1815:

 

            Reports that Lieutenant Shubrick of the ship wishes 3 months leave.

 

Roll 47 (November 2 ‑ December 29, 1815)

 

 From Captain Isaac Hull, Boston Navy Yard, 13 Dec 1815:

 

            Mentions Midshipman Alexander Eskridge in ship.

 

Roll 48 (January 1 ‑ February 28, 1816)

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, Charlestown Navy Yard, 3 Jan 1816:

 

            Forwards a list of officers and men still assigned to CONSTITUTION (not included) and reports he has sent the officers' names to Commodore Bainbridge to employ them as he will.

 

Roll 49 (March 1 ‑ July 1, 1816)

 

From Captain Charles Stewart, Philadelphia, PA, to the Secretary of the Treasury, 13 May 1816:

 

            Understanding that the Congress has voted money to CONSTITUTION's crew for the capture of HMS LEVANT, inquires as to whether or not he should apply for the money to the Treasury Secretary, and if so, requests the money be paid in Treasury notes at Philadelphia so that he can set distribution to the crew in motion.

 

Roll 50 (July 1 ‑ September 29, 1816)

 

            NOTHING     

 

Roll 51 (October 1 ‑ December 31, 1816)

 

From Captain William Bainbridge, Boston, MA, 16 Oct 1816:

 

            "...In the action with the Java, two of the Carronades on board the Constitution were in the early part of the action struck with violence by the enemy's round shot, so much so as to make considerable indentation in the guns, yet these carronades continued the remainder of the action in a active & servicable [sic] fire, and are to this day safe pieces of ordnance...

            "P.S. ...On board the Frigate Constitution under the command of the gallant Preble a heavy 24‑pounder was struck by a 32 pound shot from the Battery at Tripoli, so forcibly as to make a considerable indentation yet the piece remained Servicable throughout that noble attack, and was repeatedly tried in the various attacks of that valuable Officer against the Batteries of Tripoli."

 

Roll 52 (January 1 ‑ March 29, 1817)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 53 (April 4 ‑ May 31, 1817)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 54  (June 2 ‑ August 31, 1817)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 55  (September 2 ‑ October 30, 1817)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 56  (November 1 ‑ December 30, 1817)

 

From Captain William Bainbridge, Boston, MA, 4 Nov 1817:

 

            Forwards correspondence with Navy Agent George Harrison concerning his medal and requests that a new die of the reverse side be made.

 

[Enclosures]

 

From Bainbridge, 28 Oct 1817:

 

            "...my medal...appears to be well executed, but has one very material fault, and which I trust you will think is absolutely necessary to be altered.  I remember Java's Flag to be Struck.  The Flag at present on the die shows that the ship has not surrendered.  I know that you took too much interest in the capture of the Java to alter the flag to be kept flying, after so many hard knocks which old Ironsides gave her."

 

From Harrison, 31 Oct 1817:

 

            Reports that the die cannot be altered but will have to be remade and requests an order to do so.

 

[End of Enclosures]

 

From Captain William Bainbridge, Boston, MA, 15 Dec 1817:

 

            Forwards a new sketch of the JAVA action and again requests a new reverse die.

 

Roll 57 (January 1 ‑ March 31, 1818)

 

            NOTHING     

 

Roll 58 (April 1 ‑ June 30, 1818)

 

            NOTHING

 

 Roll 59 (July 1 ‑ August 31, 1818)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 60 (September 2 ‑ December 31, 1818)

 

From Captain William Bainbridge, Boston, MA, 12 Oct 1818:

 

            Notes that Lieutenant William [V.] Taylor is attached to CONSTITUTION in ordinary and requests his transfer to INDEPENDENCE.  

 

From Commodore William Bainbridge, Boston, MA, 15 Dec 1818:

 

            Lieutenant William Taylor now attached to INDEPENDENCE.

 

Roll 61 (January 1 ‑ March 31, 1819)

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, Boston Navy Yard, 25 Feb 1819:

 

            Submits a report on the condition of ships in ordinary at his yard as of 1 Nov 1818.

 

"Constitution‑‑44, ‑‑Hull‑‑Will require a thorough repair before she can be sent to sea.

                                Rigging‑‑All required to be new, a  part having been taken for

                                                heaving down the Macedonian & found bad – The

                                                remainder Do.  Standing and Running having remained

                                                a long time in store could not be trusted

                                Masts‑‑ Masts apparently good except the foremast which can

                                    &      be repaired. As her masts & bowsprit however have been

                                Spars     a long time in her & exposed to the weather, it is believed

                                               some of them would be found unfit for Service.  Yards &

                                               other spars mostly unfit for service ‑ some sprung &

                                               others very old & rotten.‑‑

                                Cables  All required to be new.

                                Water Casks‑ A full set required.

                                Stores ‑ Nearly all required, having landed but few, a part of

                                                which have been taken for other ships, and part on hand

                                                in bad condition."

 

Roll 62 (April 2 ‑ May 30, 1819)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 63 (June 1 ‑ July 29, 1819)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 64 (August 7 ‑ October 31, 1819)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 65 (November 3 ‑ December 31, 1819)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 66 (January 1 ‑ March 31, 1820)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 67 (April 2 ‑ June 30, 1820)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 68 (July 1 ‑ September 30, 1820)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 69 (October 2 ‑ December 28, 1820)

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, Boston Navy Yard, 9 Oct 1820:

 

            CONSTITUTION is "undergoing repair."

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, Boston Navy Yard, 7 Nov 1820:

 

            Reports having received orders to fit CONSTITUTION for sea.  Notes that Lieutenants Storer, Geisinger, and Jarvis have been ordered to her.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, Boston Navy Yard, 10 Nov 1820:

 

            Reports he has ordered Lieutenant William Berry aboard CONSTITUTION.

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, Boston Navy Yard, 13 Nov 1820:

 

            Reports he has ordered Purser Thomas Breese aboard CONSTITUTION.

 

From Captain John Shaw, USS INDEPENDENCE, 24 Nov 1820:

 

            Has been absent and asks about the order to move 30 of his main deck guns to CONSTITUTION.        

 

Roll 70 (January 1 – March 31, 1820)

 

From Captain Jacob Jones, Head of Sassafras, MD, 30 Jan 1821:

 

            Accepts orders to command CONSTITUTION in the Mediterranean.  Requests permission to remain on his farm until the crew begins arriving.

 

From Captain John Shaw, USS INDEPENDENCE, 31 Jan 1821:

 

            A rendezvous for CONSTITUTION will be opened immediately.

 

From Captain John Shaw, USS INDEPENDENCE, 7 Feb 1821:

 

            A rendezvous for CONSTITUTION has been opened.  Is the enlistment to be for two or three years?  Will a three‑ year enlistee receive higher pay?

 

From Captain Jacob Jones, Head of Sassafras, MD, 9 Feb 1821:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of permission to remain on farm.  As that "Lieutenant Gallagher" be ordered to the ship if possible as he would like to have aboard "a seaman of experience & activity."  [Not done.]

 

From Captain John Shaw, USS INDEPENDENCE, 15 Feb 1821:

 

            Eighty‑eight seamen, ordinary seamen, and boys have enlisted for CONSTITUTION to date.

 

From Captain Jacob Jones, Georgetown Crossroads, MD, 27 Feb 1821:

 

            Request his son, Midshipman Richard A. Jones, be ordered to CONSTITUTION.  [Done.]

 

From Captain Jacob Jones, Georgetown Crossroads, MD, 9 Mar 1821:

 

            Has no objection to "Mr. Parker" as First Lieutenant in CONSTITUTION.

 

From Captain Jacob Jones, Georgetown Crossroads, MD, 19 Mar 1821:

 

            Has no objection to having Master Commandant [Benjamin W.] Booth in CONSTITUTION, and requests Midshipman Samuel F. Dupont because of his "perfect knowledge of the french [sic] language."  [Done.]

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, Boston Navy Yard, 20 Mar 1821:

 

            CONSTITUTION is in such a state of forwardness as to require her officers present to take charge.

 

From Captain Jacob Jones, Georgetown Crossroads, MD, 24 Mar 1821:

 

            Has received his orders dated 19 Mar, and will leave for Boston on the 27th.

 

Roll 71 (April 3 ‑ June 15, 1821)

 

From Captain Jacob Jones, Boston, MA, 6 Apr 1821:

 

            Reports arrived in Boston on 4 Apr.  The ship will be ready to sail in two weeks if all goes well.

 

From Captain Samuel Angus, New York, NY, 7 Apr 1821:

 

            Reports having shipped 28 seamen and ordinary seamen for CONSTITUTION.

 

From Captain Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 12 Apr 1821:

 

            CONSTITUTION now anchored in the stream.  When the New York draft arrives, should have a crew of 415‑420.  Forty‑seven now on sick list and still no Surgeon.

 

From Captain Samuel Evans, New York, NY, 23 Apr 1821:

 

            Boatswain [Thomas] Smith of WASHINGTON has been sent to CONSTITUTION.

 

From Captain Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 24 Apr 1821:

 

            Supplies and personnel have not arrived as hoped; should be ready to sail in another 10 days.  Joseph Hill and John Lyncoln [sic], who enlisted for this ship, are said to be deserters from LYNX.  As they have been pardoned, will take them with me if they wish to go.  [They didn't.]  Tested the paddling machine yesterday, but didn't do so fully as it broke.

 

From Captain Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 28 Apr 1821:

 

            Gunner William Johnson died last night.

 

From Captain Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 13 May 1821:

 

            Departed Boston this morning.

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 5 Jun 1821:

 

            Arrived Gibraltar on 3 June.  Expects to make port calls around the western Mediterranean basin (and Tripoli) in the next 10‑12 weeks.

 

Roll 72 (June 18 ‑ July 31, 1821)

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 28 Jul 1821:

 

            Writing from Leghorn, reports all is peaceful in the region.  There is news that the Greek revolutionaries have had some success.  Intends to sail for Port Mahon on the 29th for supplies from the US.

 

Roll 73 (August 1 ‑ September 30, 1821)

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 18 Aug 1821:

 

            Writing from Gibraltar.  Arrived on 16th.  Four Midshipmen are being returned to the US: [Thomas H.] Saul and [John] Buchanan, who intend to resign, and [Lucius C.] Heylin and [James] Bradford for health reasons.

 

Roll 74 (October 1 ‑ December 28, 1821)

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 7 Oct 1821:

 

            Writing from Port Mahon.  All is quiet.  Intends to sail "tomorrow" to touch ports in France, Italy, and the Barbary shore before returning to Gibraltar in Dec.  Captain [Master Commandant Benjamin W.] Booth has been permitted to return to the US due to health reasons.  First Lieutenant [Foxall A.] Parker has been designated as "lieutenant commandant."

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 26 Nov 1821:

 

            At Gibraltar.  All is quiet.  Intends to go to Port Mahon in about a week.

 

Roll 75 (January 2 ‑ May 30, 1822)

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 7 Feb 1822:

 

            At Port Mahon.  All is quiet politically.  Reports Midshipman [Thomas B.] Worthington was killed by Midshipman [Samuel] Galiard [sic: Gaillard] on 4 Feb.  The cause was some sort of horse play in steerage, and also involved Midshipmen [John D.] Bird, [James] Bradford, [John S.] Paine, and [Wilson C.] Purviance.  Jones admits being aware of squabbling among his midshipmen, but had not realized how far things had deteriorated.  Intends sailing for Gibraltar about 15 Mar.

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 18 Mar 1822:

 

            Arrived at Gibraltar on the 17th after a 6‑day passage.  All is quiet.  Neither the Turks nor the Greeks are reported to be impeding neutral shipping.  Intends leaving later in the month for Leghorn and then Tunis, and then will make a run to Smyrna to see the area for himself.

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 11 Apr 1822:

 

            At Gibraltar.  No news.  Plans remain unchanged.

 

Roll 76 (June 3 ‑ September 28, 1822)

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 9 Jun 1822:

 

            Arrived at Messina, Sicily, 2 days since.  No news.  Intends to sail on the 10th for Smyrna.  Has given permission to Midshipmen [Samuel F.] Dupont and [Archibald R.] Bogardus to return to the US for their lieutenant's exam.  Believes that Dupont "will be one of our most distinguished officers."

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 24 Jun 1822:

 

            All is tranquil at Smyrna.

            "There was a final massacre of the Greeks of Scio on thursday [sic] last, about 4, or 5 thousand, in consequence of the Greek fleet having sent a fire ship among that of the Turks, & succeeded in blowing up one of their new 74s with the Captain Pasha & 1500 men."

            Intends to sail among the islands beginning "tomorrow" to gather intelligence.

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 1 Aug 1822:

 

            From Gibraltar, having arrived that morning.  Had left Smyrna on 25 Jun and called at Ipsara and Idira Islands.  The Greeks currently are everywhere victorious, and have taken Athens.

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 4 Aug 1822:

 

            Concerned with an alleged debt of $5000 from previous command which, he states, was the Purser's and, he thought, settled.

 

Roll 77 (October 3 ‑ December 3, 1822)

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 12 Oct 1822:

 

            Arrived at Leghorn on the 9th.  No news.  Expects to leave about the 18th and take Consul Stith back to his post at Tunis following surgery to remove an eye.

 

 From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 23 Nov 1822:

 

            Sailed from Leghorn on 25 Oct, and sent ONTARIO to Tunis.  Left Port Mahon on 12 Nov with NONSUCH and on the 13th sent her to Algiers to land Consul Shaler and return to Mahon.  No news.

 

Roll 78 (January 7 ‑ June 30, 1822)

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, Middletown, CT, 22 Jan 1822:

 

            Reports his health is "much better" and requests orders to CONSTITUTION upon her expected return from the Mediterranean.  Considers himself "too young" to remain long inactive ashore.  [Done in 1824.]

 

Roll 79 (July 1 ‑ December 30, 1822)

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 29 Dec 1822:

 

            Arrived at Port Mahon on 20 Dec.  All is quiet.

 

Roll 80 (January 1 ‑ March 31, 1823)

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 6 Feb 1823:

 

            At Port Mahon.

 

Roll 81 (April 1 ‑ May 26, 1823)

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Apr 1823:

 

            Arrived at Gibraltar on 20 Apr.

 

Roll 82 (May 26 ‑ July 10, 1823)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 83 (July 10 ‑September 2, 1823)

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 11 Jul 1823:           

 

            Arrived at Leghorn on 4 July, having called at Algiers, Tunis, Malta, and Syracuse since leaving Gibraltar.  All's well.  Intends going next to Port Mahon and then back to Gibraltar.

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 15 Aug 1823:

 

            Sailed from Port Mahon on 5 Aug and arrived at Gibraltar on the 10th with ONTARIO.  Relations peaceful.  The Franco‑Spanish War seems stalemated, with the Spanish keeping a firm hold on all fortified cities and the French roaming the open country.

 

Roll 84 (September 2 ‑ November 8, 1823)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 85 (November 8 ‑ December 31, 1823)

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 23 Nov 1823:

 

            Arrived at Gibraltar on 16 Nov, having landed Minister Nelson at Cadiz.  He reports that Surgeon Heap will act in the place of Mr. Stith, who died on 2 Nov, as US Consul at Tunis.  Intends remaining at Gibraltar until relieved.

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 7 Dec 1823:

 

            At Gibraltar.  All's quiet.  Concerned about riding out winter gales at Gibraltar with anchor cables that are not bad enough to survey, but clearly nearing the end of their usefulness.

 

Roll 86 (January 2 ‑ April 14, 1824)

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 19 Jan 1824:

 

            Awaiting his relief in CYANE.  Peaceful relations continue with all nations.

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 10 Feb 1824:

 

            Awaiting CYANE.  The British Consul has been ordered out of Algiers by his government; there may be war between Britain and Algiers.

 

From Commodore Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 9 Mar 1824:

 

            Awaiting CYANE; concerned because crew is beginning to "express dissatisfaction" over the prospect of remaining in service beyond their enlistments.  With enlistments now for three years, he fears that delays will result in his returning home with "the greater number of them in Irons."  Britain is rumored to have declared war on Algiers.

 

From Captain Melancthon T. Woolsey, Sackett's Harbor, NY, [?] Mar 1824:

 

            In a statement of service, notes that he served as Second Lieutenant in CONSTITUTION from his transfer from ESSEX in May 1806 until CONSTITUTION returned to the US in 1807.

 

Roll 87 (April 14 ‑ June 9, 1824)

 

 From Captain John O. Creighton, USS CYANE, 22 Apr 1824:

 

            "The departure of the Constitution after my arrival was so immediate, that it was out of my power to write to you, and I therefore requested Commodore Jones to make my excuse..."  Britain has blockaded Algiers.

 

From Captain Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 20 May 1824:

 

            From off Sandy Hook, reports a passage of 39 days from Gibraltar.  CYANE had arrived on 9 apr and he sailed on 10 Apr.  Since most of the crew's time has expired, expects orders to discharge them.  Requests permission to visit his family soonest.

 

From Captain Samuel Evans, New York Navy Yard, 21 May 1824:

 

            CONSTITUTION arrived last evening.  "In attempting to bring her too off the Yard she parted both her bower cables and drifted upon a shole [sic] near the Ship Yard on Manhattan Island where she lay until about eleven oclock last night when she was got off without any apparent injury‑‑  She got on the Shoal on the top or nearly at the top of high water, and as the tide ebbed rapidly she could not be got off until about half flood, but as she did not I believe use more than a foot, was from the Stern post and remained nearly upon an even keel, I do not believe she received injury."

 

From Captain Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 21 May 1824:

 

            Arrived "yesterday, but upon anchoring opposite the yard,...we parted two cables and drifted on a gravel bank where we lay one ebb, the ship upright and waterborne, touching touching only about fifteen feet a stern [sic], where she shewed [sic] but one foot.  We laid out two anchors and hove taught [sic] the cables, and commenced lightening her, with the intention of heaving off at high water, but at half flood, we having got out but a part of the shot and one gun, she floated off, without heaving, and I am confident without injury to her, as nothing of her touched ground but about fifteen feet of her keel; I have requested Capt. Evans to prepare a place for our hauling in to the Yard, which he about to do..."

 

From Captain Samuel Evans, New York Navy Yard, 22 May 1824:

 

            "...Constitution has hauled into the Yard..."

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, Middletown, CT, 22 May 1824:

 

            Repeats his interest in gaining command of CONSTITUTION.

 

From Captain Jacob Jones, USS CONSTITUTION, 28 May 1824:

 

            Ship is in Yard.  Believes he can leave her in the care of Lieutenants [Foxhall A.] Parker, [Samuel L.] Breeze, and [Joseph R.] Jarvis while he visits his family.  Has already sent on shore leave Lieutenants [George W.] Storer, [David] Geisinger, [John H.] Aulick, and [William] Boerum.  Purser [Thomas] Breese is involved in paying off crew.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, Middletown, CT, 28 May 1824:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of order to be ready for active service.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, Middletown, CT, 1 Jun 1824:

 

            Asks that Purser W. Halsey be assigned to his ship.

 

From Master Commandant George W. Rodgers, USS CONSTITUTION, to Captain Charles G. Ridgely, New York Navy Yard, 2 Jun 1824:

 

            Notifies him that Captain Samuel Evans, Commandant, New York Navy Yard, died of a burst blood vessel experienced while boarding CONSTITUTION at about noon this date.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, Middletown, CT, 4 Jun 1824:

 

            Acknowledges orders to CONSTITUTION.  Request that Lieutenant Elie A. F. Vallette and Sailing Master Philip S. Meyer be assigned to the ship.

 

From Captain Charles G. Ridgely, New York Navy Yard, 5 Jun 1824:

 

            Reports that Midshipman Edward S. Lewis would like orders to CONSTITUTION.  [So ordered.]

 

Roll 88 (June 9 ‑ October 12, 1824)

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, New York, NY, 11 Jun 1824:

 

            Requests [Gunner] John Fair be assigned CONSTITUTION.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, New York, NY, 11 Jun 1824 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Repeats request for Gunner Fair and adds Passed Midshipman Benjamin Tallmadge, Jr., to be Acting Master.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, New York, NY, 12 Jun 1824:

 

            Says he has received many requests for assignment to CONSTITUTION.  Since he knows of no officers ordered to the ship he submits a list of those he would prefer:

 

    Elie A. Vallette  - Lieutenant

    William Laughton - Lieutnant

    Benjamin Page, Jnr.- Lieutenant

    Thomas W. Wyman- Lieutenant

    Josiah Tattnall - Lieutenant

    Charles T. Platt - Lieutenant

    Leonard Osborne ‑ Surgeon

    James M. Halsey - Purser

    Benjamin Tallmadge - Acting Master

    James H. Ward - Midshipman

    Richard H. Morris - Midshipman

    John Fair ‑ Gunner

 

[Vallette, Page, Wyman, Tattnall, Tallmadge, Ward, and Morris received orders to the ship.]

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, New York, NY, 16 Jun 1824:

 

            Forwards requests for orders to CONSTITUTION from Midshipmen Miller and Lewis.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, New York, NY, 17 Jun 1824:

 

            Requests, since Dr. Osborne has been ordered to ONTARIO, that Dr. Andrew B. Cook be ordered to CONSTITUTION.  Says he has little confidence in the abilities of Dr. Thorn.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, New York, NY, 22 Jun 1824:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of a letter concerning Chaplain Cook.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, New York, NY, 23 Jun 1824:

 

            Forwards a request from Midshipman Ellison in CONSTITUTION to be transferred to the New York Station in order to recover his health and attend school in WASHINGTON.  He agrees.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, 26 Jun 1824:

 

            Reports that Lieutenant Page has received an injury which has led him to request to remain ashore.  He agrees and asks for Lieutenant Joseph Cross in his place.  [So ordered.]

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, New York, NY, 28 Jun 1824:

 

            Says that if Midshipman Tallmadge is unavailable, he would be happy with Sailing Master Doxey "or any other capable, steady man."  Reminds the Department that he still has no doctor assigned and that Dr. Cook is his candidate.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, New York, NY, [?] Jun 1824:

 

            Forwards request from Midshipman Magruder to join CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, New York, NY, 2 Jul 1824:

 

            Forwards request from Midshipman Morris to join CONSTITUTION.  [Yes.]

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, New York, NY, 9 Jul 1824:

 

            Forwards requests from Midshipmen [John W.] Mooers and McMullin to join CONSTITUTION.  [Mooers yes.]

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, Middletown, CT, 15 Jul 1824:

 

            Reports he left CONSTITUTION a week ago to visit his family and, perhaps, improve his health.  Unless otherwise directed, intends to remain at home for another "five or six" days.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, New York, NY, 2 Aug 1824:

 

            Requests cancellation of his request for Lieutenant Joseph Cross because he understands that since the days they sailed together he has become "very intemperate."

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, New York, NY, 14 Aug 1824:

 

            Requests that Midshipman Van Dyke be ordered to CONSTITUTION.  [No.]

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, New York, NY, 31 Aug 1824:

 

            Reports that CONSTITUTION still lacks a Surgeon and a Gunner.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, New York, NY, 21 Sep 1824:

 

            Requests permission to take his 4‑5 year‑old son on voyage as a passenger.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, New York, NY, 22 Sep 1824:

 

            Reports that Midshipman Charles E. Hawkins very much wants to go in CONSTITUTION, and has gotten Midshipman Barnhouse to agree to be replaced.  Barnhouse, however, is under suspension.  Referred for decision.  [No.]

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, New York, NY, 28 Sep 1824:

 

            Dr. Samuel G. Howe has requested passage to Greece in CONSTITUTION.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 30 Sep 1824:

 

            As requested, forwards a list of the ship's officers, noting that Surgeon Turk has not yet reported and that no Gunner, Boatswain, or Sailmaker has yet been assigned.  Recommends John Ball as Boatswain and says there is a good sailmaker's mate in the ship who might be warranted.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 2 Oct 1824:

 

            Having learned the Secretary is at Trenton, repeats his submission of officers aboard, noting this time that a Chaplain and a Surgeon's Mate also are wanted.  He suggests a "Mr. Wells of Hartford" as Chaplain, John Lord as Gunner, John Ball as Acting Boatswain.  Expects to take powder aboard "Monday next."

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 2 Oct 1824 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Readdresses and forwards a letter from the ship's midshipmen requesting an advance of four months' pay with which to prepare for the forthcoming deployment.  [annotated: forbidden by law.]

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 7 Oct 1824:

 

            Neither Surgeon Turk nor Surgeon's Mate Williamson has yet reported; only Surgeon's Mate Waters Smith is present.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 8 Oct 1824:

 

            Surgeon Turk reported this date.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 11 Oct 1824:

 

            Mr. Coxe, our Consul in Tunis, came aboard today with his family and effects, ready to sail.  The powder first tested failed proof; now expects to load satisfactory powder beginning "tomorrow."  Slop clothing is expected to be ready for loading in "two or three days."  That done, will only be short Chaplain, Gunner, and Surgeon's Mate to be ready for sea.  Doctor Turk's health is delicate.  Dr. Williamson is not wanted as he is understood to be intemperate.

 

Roll 89 (October 12 ‑ December 31, 1824)

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 16 Oct 1824:

 

            Has completed loading powder except for a few barrels being made into cylinders which will be loaded "the day after tomorrow (Monday)."  Still needs a Chaplain, Gunner, and Surgeon's Mate.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 18 Oct 1824:

 

            Has received orders for Gunner John Lord and has appointed John Ball Acting Boatswain.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 20 Oct 1824:

 

            Mentions [Purser] Timberlake and [Midshipman] Barnhouse.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 21 Oct 1824:

 

            Requests disposition of deserter Marine Private James Scott, who has been returned by authorities in Philadelphia, where he had turned himself in.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 21 Oct 1824 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Reports he has had a further conversation with Purser Timberlake and Midshipman Barnhouse regarding their differences and believes things have been resolved.  Barnhouse recognizes he acted improperly and, hopefully, has learned a lesson.  Is he to be returned to duty?

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 22 Oct 1824:

 

            Discusses his decision to deny Master at Arms James Sterett's request to have his wife accompany them to the Mediterranean, something already denied to a number of others.  "Women are frequently serviceable with the sick, but I have seldom known them to be on board, without producing difficulty among the men, and being otherwise troublesome."

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 22 Oct 1824 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Chaplain McCarty joined this date.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Oct 1824:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of sailing orders dated 16 Oct.  Will sail as soon as "Dr. Burch" and "Lieut Armstrong" join.  Sailmaker Burchstead has reported himself by mail from Boston.  Will not delay ship for him.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Oct 1824 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Forwards a petition from the ship's Marine Guard seeking his restoration to duty with all pledging themselves to his future good conduct.  Signed by: J. W. Swords, George Hackett, Nicks Hurley, Petre [sic] Pope, Benjamin Norcross, Benjamin Johnson, Brooks Beard, James F. Curran, Jno M. Keenan, Andrew Scarling, William Sawer [sic], P. Quinn, John Miller, Nicholes [sic] Lee, William Scott, William Shirkey, William Speed, William Dever, William Dudley Walsh, James Foster, John Nash, Jonas Abbott, Charles McCracken, Jas Wall, David Lochart [sic], Hugh Clifford, Isaac V. Shoemaker, William Fleming, [?] Laws, Wm Browne, Primrose McPherson, John Scofield, Roderick McLane, and James P. Walsh.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 27 Oct 1824:

 

            All officers have now reported except the Sailmaker and Midshipman Charles E. Hawkins, who is known to be in New York.  Lieutenant Newcomb has come aboard as a passenger, enroute to take command of NONSUCH.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 27 Oct 1824 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Lieutenant William M. Armstrong and Surgeon's Mate DeWitt Birch reported today.  Will sail soonest.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 25 Nov 1824:

 

            Arrived at Gibraltar on 24 Nov.  Once filled with water, will sail for Algiers, Tunis, and Tripoli.  Our relations are everywhere peaceful.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 26 Nov 1824:

 

            Reports no deaths, desertions, or discharges this month.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 30 Nov 1824:

 

            Has given Acting Midshipman Skipwith permission to return to the US to resign.

 

Roll 90 (January 1 ‑ February 18, 1825)

 

From Commodore Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 8 Jan 1825:

 

            Came into Syracuse on 22 Dec because of a defective mainmast.  Had arrived at Tunis on 24 Dec [sic] to offload Consul Coxe and family after trying unsuccessfully for three days (due to weather) to send a boat in to Algiers.  Coxe well received.  Subsequently discovered a portion of the larboard fish near the head was rotten, allowing the bib and trestletrees to settle.  (The fish was made up of two pieces.)  Trestletrees, too, were found to be defective.  Now repairing.  Also, at Tunis broke a new anchor.  Examination showed a flaw in the iron involving about one‑third the shank's diameter.  Have given Lieutenant Cross and Midshipmen Colhoun and Skipwith permission to return to the US, the latter with the intention of resigning.

 

From Commodore Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 15 Jan 1825:

 

            Midshipmen James B. Glentworth, John W. Mooers, Samuel Swartwout, and Henry W. Morris were involved in a duel yesterday, the first two as principals.  As a mark of disapproval, have ordered all back to the US.

 

From Commodore Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 12 Feb 1825:

 

            Left Gibraltar on 30 Nov.  Now at Messina.  No discharges or desertions during December; no deaths or desertions during January.

 

From Commodore Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 15 Feb 1825:

 

            Still at Messina.  Has given Lieutenant Gibbon permission to return to the US for his health.

 

Roll 91 (February 18 ‑ April 11, 1825)

 

From Commodore Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 28 Feb 1825:

 

            Still at Messina.  No deaths or desertions this month.

 

From Commodore Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 9 Mar 1825:

 

            Still at Messina.  Forwards proceedings of court martial of Midshipman Edward M. Vail.

 

From Commodore Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 8 Mar 1825:

 

            At Messina.  Forwards the warrant of Midshipman Augustus Barnhouse, who has resigned to avoid court martial.  Cheated at cards.

 

From Commodore Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 31 Mar 1825:

 

            At Messina.  Forwards monthly returns of the squadron.

 

Roll 92 (April 11 ‑ June 3, 1825)

 

From Commodore Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 30 Apr 1825:

 

            At Messina.  Forwards monthly returns.  Reports the death of Lieutenant Gardner, officer in charge of his Marine Guard, after a short illness: an amiable and excellent officer.

 

From Captain John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 30 Apr 1825:

 

            Reports being surprised and mortified not to find even a single vessel of the squadron awaiting him when he arrived at Gibraltar yesterday; furthermore, no‑one knew where they were or what they were doing.  They may be at Messina.  If Captain Macdonough was apprised that I was coming, will remove him from command for neither meeting me nor leaving word of where he was.

 

Roll 93 (June 5 ‑ July 7, 1825)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 17 Jun 1824:

 

            At Gibraltar.

            "Capt Mcdonough [sic] I am sorry to find still continues in delicate health; and from the explanations he has given on relation to his not joining me, or putting it in my power to know where orders were certain to reach him, I shall not be I am glad to say, under the necessity of using measures towards him, which would have been disagreeable not only to him but to me also..."

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 23 Jun 1825:

 

            Requests a Boatswain's warrant for John Ball.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 26 Jun 1825:

 

            Has given Chaplain J. McCarty of CONSTITUTION permission to return to the US.  McCarty has promised to resign if the Secretary disapproves of his return.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 26 Jun 1825:

 

            No desertions or discharges during the previous month.

 

Roll 94 (July 7 ‑ August 15, 1825)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 95 (August 15 ‑ September 22, 1825)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 30 Aug 1825:

 

            Arrived at Smyrna on 20 Aug with CONSTITUTION, ERIE, and ONTARIO.

 

From Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 1 Sep 1825:

 

            At Vourla.  No deaths, desertions, or discharges during the past month.

 

Roll 96  (September 22 ‑ October 25, 1825)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 18 Oct 1825:

 

            "I am sorry to inform you that the extreme ill health of Capt. Mcdonough [sic], and the distress of mind occasioned by the recent death of his wife has induced him to require to be superceded [sic] in the command of the Constitution, with permission to return to the U. States.  I have accordingly ordered Capt. Patterson to supercede  him in the command of that ship, and Capt. Mcdonough's passage is already engaged on board the Brig Edwin bound to New York for the cabin of which vessel and the putting on board of her twenty invalids necessarily discharged from the squadron I was under the necessity of engaging to pay the extravagent [sic] demand of $1300.

            "I hope that my having permitted Doctor Turk the Surgeon of the Constitution to return with him will be approved by the Department...

            "Doctor Jackson who has been sick on shore for the last five months has at length recovered ‑ and I shall order him to take the place of Doctor Turk on board the Constitution..."

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 18 Oct 1825 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Has given permission for Midshipman Joseph Arnold of CONSTITUTION to return to the US for reasons of health [a "catarrhal complaint" and a "tendency to pulmonary disease"].

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 19 Oct 1825:

 

            Has given permission to Midshipman Joseph A. Hemphill of CONSTITUTION to return to the US in order to resign.

 

From SecNav to Captain Thomas Macdonough, USS CONSTITUTION, 11 Jul 1825 [received and returned by Captain Rodgers after Macdonough's departure]:

 

            Approves of the action taken against Midshipmen Swartwout and Mooers.

 

Roll 97 (October 26 ‑ November 28, 1825)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 1 Nov 1825:

 

[Enclosures]

 

"Monthly Pay of the Commsd. & Warrant Officers of the United States Ship Constitution.

 

--|Pay|Rats/Day|Whole Amt.

 

1 Captain

$100

8

$160.00

7 Lieutenants

$280

21

437.50

1 Chaplain

$40

2

55.00

1 Surgeon

$50

2

65.00

1 Master

$40

2

55.00

1 Purser

$40

2

55.00

1 School Master

$25

2

40.00

 2 Surgeon's Mates

$60

4

90.00

1 1st Lt. Marines

$30

4

60.00

1 2d Lt. Marines

$30

2

45.00

1 Boatswain

$20

2

35.00

1 Gunner

$20

2

35.00

1 Carpenter

$20

2

35.00

1 Sail Maker

$20

2

35.00

20 Midshipmen

$350

20

530.00

1 Clerk

$25

1

32.50

[Totals]

$1180

78

4765.00

Amount annually

14150

28080

21180.00

Required for private monthly purchase of stores $600 Annually 7200.00
Whole Amount required annually      $28380.00

                                                                                                

"Provisions required by the U. States Ship Constitution, Danl T. Patterson, Esqr., Commander ‑ for Six Months ‑ calculating for Four Hundred & fifty Men, with the addition of five percent ‑‑

 

Beef

40080 lbs.

(203 bbls.)

Pork

33600 lbs.

(168 bbls.)

Bread

69600 lbs.

(870 bbls.)

Raisins

5360 lbs.

--

Suet

‑‑

--

Flour

12000 lbs.

(64 bbls.)

Cheese

4320 lbs.

--

Butter

1440 lbs.

--

Rice

1425 gals.

--

Beans

1425 gals.

--

Molasses

712.5 gals.

--

Vinegar

712.5 gals.

--

Spirits

4950 gals.

--

Oil 225 Gals. --

 

Raisins as a substitute for Suet.

Oil for Candles.

                                John B. Timberlake

                                Purser"

 

"The quantity of Slop clothing for a first years supply having been received, the following articles will be required for the year 1826

 

534 ea. Duck Frocks, Duck Trowsers, Black Silk Handkerchiefs -- required to be delivered in the month of March 1826

140 Pea Jackets, 400 Blue Cloth Jakcets, 800 Blue Cloth Trowsers, 800 Pair Stockings, 600 White Flannel Shirts, 600 White Flannel Drawers, 600 Pair of Shoes, and 100 Red Vests -- required to be delivered Oct 1st 1826 

 

Of the other articles of clothing allowed by the regulations, none are wanted, except hats which can be purchased of a better quality and on better terms here.

 

                                John B. Timberlake

                                Purser"

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 4 Nov 1825:

 

            "...Captain Patterson since the return of Captain McDonough [sic] to the U. States has been in command of the Constitution, but will be put in command of the Brandywine as you directed ‑‑

            "...I received a letter from Capt Read (dated at Havre on his leaving [Brandywine]) requesting service and I have written him to join me at Mahon as early as possible ‑ when he arrives I shall appoint him to the command of the Constitution..."

 

Roll 98 (November 28 ‑ December 31, 1825)

 

From Captain Isaac Chauncey, New York Navy Yard, 28 Nov 1825:

 

            Reports to the death of Captain Thomas Macdonough aboard the brig EDWIN on 10 Nov off the Delaware capes.  The body was delivered to the New York Navy Yard for further disposition.

 

From Captain Isaac Chauncey, New York Navy Yard, 2 Dec 1825:

 

            Macdonough's funeral took place yesterday in New York, then the body was placed on the steam boat COMMERCE for return to Middletown, CT, and interment.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 20 Dec 1825:

 

            Arrived at Port Mahon on 28 Nov in company with CONSTITUTION, BRANDYWINE, and ERIE.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 26 Dec 1825:

 

            Reports having held a board of promotion examination, assisted by Captains Patterson and Deacon, for Midshipmen Samuel F. Dupont, John Pope, Levin M. Powell, and John A. Carr.  All are felt qualified for promotion.

 

Roll 99 (January 1 ‑ April 1, 1826)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 22 Jan 1826:

 

            "Captain [George C.] Read arrived here [Port Mahon] yesterday...and is now in command of the CONSTITUTION."

Read brought with him word of Thomas Macdonough's death.  Squadron flags were flown at half mast and minute guns fired at noon.

 

Roll 101 [sic] (February 10 ‑ March 20, 1826)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, to Captain David Deacon, USS ERIE, 18 Feb 1826:

 

[Enclosure]

 

Midshipman Henry W. Morris transferred from CONSTITUTION to BRANDYWINE, 17 Feb 1826.

Midshipman L. B. Newell transferred from CONSTITUTION to BRANDYWINE, 18 Feb 1826.

Lieutenant J. Tattnall of CONSTITUTION and Lieutenant R. Voorhees of BRANDYWINE exchanged, 20 Feb 1826.

Midshipmen G. M. Bache, Henry Hoff, & Page, Mr. Jones Schoolmaster & Mr. Fairlie Captains Clerk transferred from BRANDYWINE to CONSTITUTION, 20 Feb 826.

Midshipman P. H. Hayne transferred from BRANDYWINE to CONSTITUTION, 21 Feb 1826.

Midshipman W. D. Porter transferred from BRANDYWINE to CONSTITUTION, 23 Feb 1826.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 10 Oct 1825 [duplicate]:

 

            Just arrived at Gibraltar, CONSTITUTION in company.  Captain Macdonough's health is such that he has requested permission to return to the US, "but which poor fellow, I fear he will not reach alive."

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 25 Feb 1826:

 

            "On acquainting Captains Patterson & Read of the changes it had been deemed necessary to make, they were much distressed; but as they are both men of sense they have borne the disappointment without complaint, notwithstanding Read had his heart set on visiting the Archipelago in command of a superior Frigate and Patterson of exhibiting there, the finest one in the world."

 

 Roll 102 (March 20 ‑ April 9, 1826)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 10 Apr 1826:

 

                Arrived at Gibraltar "this morning" in company with CONSTITUTION and PORPOISE.  ONTARIO expected shortly from Algiers.

 

Roll 103 (May 1 ‑ 28, 1826)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 7 May 1826:

 

            Surgeon Samuel Jackson of CONSTITUTION, due to an "extreme debility & no prospect of his recovery," has been given permission to return to the US.

            Surgeons currently are distributed as follows in the squadron: CONSTITUTION has Surgeon L. Osborne (whose health is poor) and Surgeon's Mate J. Brooke.

            Doctor DeWitt Birch died on 1 May of typhus.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 13 May 1826:

 

            Captain Patterson believes the crew of CONSTITUTION, many of whose enlistments expire next summer will ship for an additional year, especially if he can advance them one or two months pay and give them a run ashore at a port like Port Mahon.

 

Roll 104 (May 29 ‑ June 26, 1826)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 25 Jun 1826:

 

            Arrived at Vourla in company with CONSTITUTION, ONTARIO, and PORPOISE on the 20th.  ERIE has since joined, bringing whole squadron together.  Intends to have CONSTITUTION replace ERIE in the Aegean when that ship leaves in August.

 

Roll 105 (June 25 ‑ July 27, 1826)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 18 Jul 1826:

 

            Left Vourla with CONSTITUTION, ONTARIO, and PORPOISE on 30 Jun.  Arrived at Tenedos on 2 Jul.

            "On the 4th Inst. a Division of the Turkish fleet consisting of two ships of the Line, four Frigates and seventeen Corvettes and Brigs [under the Capudan Bey]...made its appearance coming out of the Dardanelles."

            Departed Tenedos on the 9th.  Anchored off Myteline on the 11th.  On the 14th, the Capudan Pasha's fleet appeared: 2 ships of the line, 7 frigates, 7 corvettes, and 11 brigs and schooners.

 

Roll 106 (July 27 ‑ August 31, 1826)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 107 (September 1 ‑ October 14, 1826)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 11 Sep 1826:

 

            Arrived at Vourla on 19 Jul from the Dardanelles in company with CONSTITUTION and PORPOISE.  Sailed on 11 Aug with CONSTITUTION, ONTARIO, and PORPOISE for Milos by way of Mytilene, Scio, Negropont, and Cape Colonna, arriving on the 15th.  Sailed on 21 Aug, detaching ONTARIO, and arrived off Malta on the 29th, where PORPOISE was detached to await the monthly mail packet.  NORTH CAROLINA and CONSTITUTION proceeded to Port Mahon, which was reached on 10 Sep.  Thusfar, no American merchant has been victimized by pirates in the Aegean Sea.  Intends to go to Gibraltar once PORPOISE arrives with dispatches.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 17 Sep 1826:

 

            Has transferred an ailing Surgeon L. Osborne from CONSTITUTION to ERIE for return to the US, as well as Midshipman Richard H. Morris who suffers from a chronic prostate problem.

 

Roll 108 (October 14 ‑ November 27, 1826)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 5 Nov 1826:

 

            Arrived at Gibraltar this date, CONSTITUTION and PORPOISE being left at Port Mahon for the purpose of overhauling rigging, etc., and reentering their crews to extend their terms of service until May 1828.

 

From Commodor John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 11 Nov 1826:

 

            Has permitted the exchange of Lieutenant Voorhees of CONSTITUTION with Lieutenant McCulloch of ERIE so the ailing former officer may return to the US.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 11 Nov 1826 [2nd ltr]:

 

            CONSTITUTION's crew "have already reship'ed" until May 1828.

            "Captain Patterson is a sensible and discreet Officer...entire Confidence may be placed [in him]..."

 

Roll 109  (November 3 ‑ December 31, 1826)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 21 Dec 1826:

 

            Intends to send CONSTITUTION  "into the Levant" in Mar to replace ONTARIO.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 27 Dec 1826:

 

            Has approved the following Bill of Exchange for CONSTITUTION:

            Pay & Subsistence        2000 ‑

            Repairs                        2000 ‑

            Provisions                    2000 ‑                    6000 ‑

 

Roll 110 (January 2 ‑ March 17, 1827)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 21 Jan 1827:

 

            Reiterates intention of sending CONSTITUTION eastward at resumption of sailing season.  Reports first two instances of piratical acts against American merchants [Boston brigs FALCON and SUSAN] in that area.

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 3 Mar 1827:

 

            Reports arriving at Port Mahon and being surprised and disappointed at not being able to order CONSTITUTION east immediately because her mainmast is so defective that it must be "taken out & repaired," which will require an estimated 8‑10 days.                

 

Roll 111 (March 19 ‑ May 14, 1827)

 

From Commodore John Rodgers, USS NORTH CAROLINA, 23 Apr 1827:

 

            "...The defects in the Constitution's Main Mast...were found so extensive after taking it out, as to require more labour to repair it effectually than was at first anticipated, and consequently prevented her departure until the 30th ulto..."

 

[Enclosure: Commodore Rodgers' orders to Captain Daniel T. Patterson]

 

            "As soon as the Constitution under your command is ready for sea, you will proceed with her to the Archipelago for the purpose of affording protection to our commerce in that sea against the rapacity of the numerous pirates with which it at present, and has been for considerable time past infested.  In the performance of this duty you will have occasion not only for the constant practice of vigilance in affording to our Merchant vessels the desired protection; but for the exercise of your soundest judgment and discretion in avoiding yourself, and preventing in others under your command the commission of any act which might conpromit [sic] in any degree the neutral character which it is the desire of our Government to sustain in respect to the contest in which the parties at War are engaged.  By the last accounts piracies have increased,‑ some of the vessels of the Greek Navy have been engaged in piratical expeditions, and it is feared more will follow their example.  In this State of things, it will be difficult to distinguish which are pirates and which are not, and on this account advisable for you to Communicate with all Greek vessels you may fall in with, not sailing in fleet or squadron, for the purpose of ascertaining their real character & the nature of the pursuits they have been engaged in.

            "As the whole force that will be left on the Station after the departure of this Ship for the United States, will not be greater than will be generally required for the effectual protection of our commerce in the Levant, so long as the present state of things continues, I shall as soon as the Porpoise can be got ready, despatch her for Smyrna, directing her commander to report to you for orders; and before my final departure from the Station, I shall order Captain Nicholson to do the same, as soon as his crew shall have reentered and the Ship is in other respects ready for service.

            "I have written to Mr. McCall our Agent at Gibraltar suggesting to him the necessity of establishing a credit at Smyrna, and at this place [Port Mahon], such as will enable the Pursers on their requisitions, approved by the Commanding Officer, to obtain the requisite funds ion the manner pointed out in the 24th Article of the Regulations of the Navy under the Head of Commanders of Fleets or Squadrons.

            "It is expected however that no money will be drawn by any Purser except on requisitions stating specifically the object or objects for which it is required‑  In addition to this, to enable the Agent to advise the Department from time to time of the monies he has disbursed in payment of Bills, it will be necessary that the letter of advice sent by the Purser with each set of Bills, should state the Specifick [sic] Heads of Appropriation under which each amount so drawn is to be charged.

            "In relation to the manner in which funds are to be obtained, I herewith send for your government, Copies of two letters of the 30th October, and 8th of November from the Honnble Secretary of the Navy.

            "On entering the Archipelago it is desirable that you proceed direct to Smyrna, it beng the most likely place for falling in with the Ontario and delivering to Capt Nicolson the enclosed order requiring his return to this port without delay.‑

            "Should either of the Store vessels now expected be bound from this to Smyrna, I will cause a quantity of Beef, Pork, Bread, Flour, Beans, whiskey and Molasses equal to four months rations to be shipped to that place, subject to your orders.  You had better therefore advise Mr. Offley of this and make arrangements with him for its reception and Storage in the event of its being sent and arriving there in your absence.

            "Altho it has been thought advisable to keep our interests as distinct as possible from those of other nations trading in the Levant, yet from the nature of the war, and the impossibility of the Greek Government to control or impose any restraint whatever on the most abandoned of its subjects, or to prevent in its present imbecile and disregarded state, even its vessels of war from committing acts of piracy, I would advise you to afford, if required, the benefit of convoy to the Merchant vessels of nations whose men of war have afforded protection to ours.  I would not advise your giving them however, instructions other than verbal; but before even doing this, it would be necessary to ascertain that no part of their Cargoes belonged to either of the Belligerents, or was Contraband of war.

            "I would suggest your declining to reciprocate in this way with the Austrians, whose Conduct towards the Greeks has been such as to merit the reproach of the Civilized world.

            "Wishing you an agreeable and prosperous cruise..."

 

Roll 112 (May 14 ‑ July 31, 1827) [sic]

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 113 (July 30 ‑ October 6, 1827) [sic]

 

From Commodore Daniel T. Patterson, USS CONSTITUTION, 8 Aug 1827:

 

            Reports receipt of Commodore John Rodgers' letter of 30 May apprising him of the commodore's departure from the Mediterranean and his accession to squadron command until superseded.  Now down to four weeks provisions; will have to head for Port Mahon about the 20th.

 

Roll 114 (October 6 ‑ December 31, 1827)

 

 From Commodore Daniel T. Patterson, USS CONSTITUTION, 12 Nov 1827:

 

            Reports learning of the Battle of Navarino on 27 Oct and total defeat of Turkish fleet.

 

Roll 115 (January 1 ‑ 29, 1827)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 116 (March 1 ‑ April 30, 1827)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 117 (May 1 ‑ June 30, 1827)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 118 (July 1 ‑ 31, 1827)

 

From Commodore Daniel T. Patterson, USS CONSTITUTION, 5 Jul 1827:

 

            Has given permission for Midshipman Allen Harwood to return to the US to permit him to keep "in step" with others of his seniority.  His place as Acting Sailing Master of CONSTITUTION has been taken by Midshipman John H. Marshall, "an officer of much experience & exemplary deportment."

 

Roll 119 (August 1 ‑ September 30, 1827)

 

From Commodore William M. Crane, USS JAVA, 7 Sep 1827:

 

            Found CONSTITUTION at Vourla on 25 Aug.  She will remain in the Aegean until near the end of October, when she will return to Port Mahon.

 

From Midshipman E. O. Blanchard, USS CONSTITUTION, to Commodore William M. Crane, USS JAVA, 28 Aug 1827:

 

            Requests permission to return to the US for examination.  [Granted.]

 

Letter, Midshipman Paul Hayne, USS CONSTITUTION, to Commodore William M. Crane, USS JAVA, 28 Aug 1827:

 

            Also requests permission to return to the US for examination.  [Granted.]

 

Roll 120 (October 1 ‑ November 30, 1827)

 

            NOTHING

 

 Roll 121 (December 1 ‑ 31, 1827)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 122 (January 1 ‑ 31, 1828)

 

From Captain Daniel T. Patterson, USS CONSTITUTION, 5 Jan 1828:

 

            Reports rumors that promotions to "commander" are anticipated during the present session of Congress and so recommends Lieutenant E. A. F. Vallette, his "First."

 

From Commodore William M. Crane, USS JAVA, 6 Jan 1828:

 

            CONSTITUTION is caulking and overhauling.  Reports the death of Lieutenant George B. McCulloch of CONSTITUTION on 31 Dec.

 

Roll 123 (February 1 ‑ 29, 1828)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 124 (March 1 ‑ 31, 1828)

 

From Commodore William M. Crane, USS JAVA, 19 Mar 1828:

 

            "Upwards" of 50 men from CONSTITUTION re‑entered for service in JAVA and PORPOISE in the place of those whose terms are about to expire or who are invalids transferred to CONSTITUTION.

 

Roll 125 (April 1 ‑ 30, 1828)

 

From Commodore William M. Crane, USS JAVA, 2 Apr 1828:

 

            Reports the death of Purser John Timberlake of CONSTITUTION "this morning after a long and painful illness."

 

From Commodore William M. Crane, USS DELAWARE, 26 Apr 1828:

 

            Reports from Port Mahon that CONSTITUTION "will sail with the first wind for Boston."

 

From Commodore William M. Crane, USS DELAWARE, 26 Apr 1828 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Reports that Lieutenant Bladen Dulany, former First Lieutenant of JAVA, will return to the US in CONSTITUTION due to poor health.

 

Roll 126 (May 1 ‑ 31, 1828)

 

From Captain J. D. Henley, Baltimore, MD, 21 May 1828:

 

            Reports the death of Sailing Master Briscoe Doxey (inventer of the "propello marino"] "last evening after a long and painful illness."  Has left a widow and 8 children "in distressed circumstances."

 

Roll 127 (June 2 ‑ 30, 1828)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 128 (July 1 ‑ 31, 1828)

 

From Captain Daniel T. Patterson, USS CONSTITUTION, 2 Jul 1828:

 

            Reports that, due to the death of Purser J. B. Timberlake, Lieutenant R. B. Randolph was detailed to fill his duties.  Forwards requisition for monies with which to pay off the crew.

 

From Captain Daniel T. Patterson, USS CONSTITUTION, 2 Jul 1828 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Reports ship's arrival off Boston Light, having sailed from Port Mahon on 29 Apr and Gibraltar on 9 May.  Was windbound near Gibraltar until 30 May.

 

From Captain Charles Morris, Boston Navy Yard, 5 Jul 1828:

 

            Reports CONSTITUTION anchored at the yard "yesterday."

 

From Captain Charles Morris, Boston Navy Yard, to Marine Lieutenant William Dulany, USS CONSTITUTION, 5 Jul 1828:

 

            Grants him 1 week's leave.

 

From Captain Charles Morris, Boston Navy Yard, 10 Jul 1828:

 

            Expects that when orders arrive to discharge CONSTITUTION's crew, "a considerable number" will reenlist.

 

From Captain Charles Morris, Boston Navy Yard, 11 Jul 1828:

 

            Forwards request of Gunner John Lord of CONSTITUTION for orders to the yard.

 

From Captain Charles Morris, Boston Navy Yard, 12 Jul 1828:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of orders to discharge CONSTITUTION's crew and authorization of leaves of absence for the officers.

 

From Captain Charles Morris, Boston Navy Yard, 16 Jul 1828:

 

            Reports that 33 invalids arrived in CONSTITUTION and have been transferred to the receiving ship.  CONSTITUTION's crew is now paying off.

 

From Captain Daniel T. Patterson, Boston Navy Yard, 22 Jul 1828:

 

            Reports having turned over CONSTITUTION to the yard on 19 Jul.

 

Roll 129 (August 1 ‑ 30, 1828)]

 

From Captain Daniel T. Patterson, New York, NY, 7 Aug 1828:

 

            Reports that Midshipman Daniel L. Randolph boarded CONSTITUTION the "day before I sailed from Mahon," but was not ordered aboard for duty.

 

Roll 130 (September 1 ‑ 29, 1828)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 131 (October 1 ‑ 31, 1828)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 132 (November 1 ‑ 30, 1828)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 133 (December 1 ‑ 31, 1828)

 

            NOTHING     

 

Roll 134 (January 1 ‑ 31, 1829)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 135 (February 1 ‑ March 31, 1829)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 136 (April 1 ‑ 29, 1829)

 

From Captain Charles Morris, Boston Navy Yard, 6 Apr 1829:

 

            In reporting yard naval personnel strength for the first quarter of 1829, ends with note that "an invalid from the Constitution died."

 

Roll 137 (May 1 ‑ 30, 1829)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 138 (June 1 ‑ 30, 1829)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 139 (July 1 ‑ 31, 1829)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 140 (August 1 ‑ 31, 1829)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 141 (September 1 ‑ 30, 1829)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 142 (October 1 ‑ 31, 1829)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 143 (November 1 ‑ December 31, 1829)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 144 (January 1 ‑ 31, 1830)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 145 (February 1 ‑ 28, 1830)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 146 (March 1 ‑ 31, 1830)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 147 (April 1 ‑ 30, 1830)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 148 (May 1 ‑ 31, 1830)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 149 (June 1 ‑ 30, 1830)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 150 (July  1 ‑ 31, 1830)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 151 (August 1 ‑ 31, 1830)

 

From Captain John Rodgers, Washington, DC, 2 Aug 1830:

 

            Attests to the good service of Gunner William S. Cowan while serving under him in CONSTITUTION and PRESIDENT [in 1809‑11].

 

Roll 152 (September 1 ‑ 27, 1830)

 

From Captain Charles Morris, Boston Navy Yard, 27 Sep 1830:

 

        Requests, because the BNC has directed him to prepare to repair CONSTITUTION, that officer vacancies in the yard be filled: 1 or 2 lieutenants, a Master, a Boatswain, a Carpenter, and "some" midshipmen for the ordinary and a Boatswain for the yard staff.

 

Roll 153 (October 1 ‑ 30, 1830)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 154 (November 1 ‑ December 31, 1830)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 155 (January 1 ‑ 25, 1831)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 156 (February 1 ‑ 28, 1831)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 157 (March 1 ‑ 31, 1831)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 158 (April 1 ‑ 30, 1831)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 159 (May 1 ‑ 31, 1831)

 

From Captain Isaac Hull, Washington Navy Yard, 9 May 1831:

 

            Recommends Gunner's Mate Jacob Carpenter, a former crewman with him and Captain Bainbridge in CONSTITUTION, for appointment as Gunner.

 

Roll 160 (June 1 ‑ 30, 1831)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 161 (July 1 ‑ 31, 1831)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 162 (August 1 ‑ 31, 1831)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 163 (September 1 ‑ 30, 1831)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 164 (October 1 ‑ November 31, 1831) [sic]

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 165 (December 1 ‑ 31, 1831)

 

From Lieutenant John Gwinn, Philadelphia Navy Yard, to Captain James Barron, Philadelphia Navy Yard, 25 Nov 1831, enclosed in the latter's letter to SecNav, 6 Dec 1831:

 

            States that Thomas Scipion "was on board the Constitution Frigate during the whole of the late war and in all three actions of that Ship..." and is an excellent seaman.

 

Roll 166 (January 1 ‑ 31, 1832)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 167 (February 1 ‑ 29, 1832)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 168 (March 1 ‑ 31, 1832)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 169 (April 1 ‑30, 1832)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 170 (May 1 ‑ 31, 1832)

 

From Captain Charles Morris, Boston Navy Yard, 8 May 1832:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of directive to chair a court of inquiry into the conduct of Lieutenant Robert B. Randolph while acting as Purser of CONSTITUTION.

 

From Captain Charles Morris, Boston Navy Yard, 31 May 1832:

 

            Acknowledges receipt of a certified transcript from the Fourth Auditor stating that the accounts of Lieutenant Robert B. Randolph, acting Purser of CONSTITUTION, had been "examined adjusted, & closed..."  [The court finally was held in Jan 1833.]

 

Roll 171 (June 1 ‑ 30, 1832)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 172 (July 1 ‑ 31, 1832)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 173 (August 1 ‑ 31, 1832)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 174 (September 1 ‑ 28, 1832)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 175 (October 1 ‑30, 1832)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 176 (November 1 ‑ 28, 1832)

 

From Captain William Bainbridge, Boston Navy Yard, 20 Nov 1832:

 

            "...as the Commissioners have decided not to bring her [CONSTITUTION] in Dock until next Spring..." intends going on leave on 26 Nov.

 

Roll 177 (December 1 ‑ 31, 1832)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 178 (January 1 ‑ 31, 1833)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 179 (February 1 ‑ 28, 1833)

 

            NOTHING

 

 Roll 180 (March 1 ‑ 30, 1833)

 

From Captain Wolcott Chauncey, Washington, DC, 25 Mar 1833:

 

            Requests to be considered for command of CONSTITUTION, which is said to be fitted out for duty.  Has been unemployed for 10 years!

 

Roll 181 (April 1 ‑ 30, 1833)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 182 (May 1 ‑ 31, 1833)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 183 (June 1 ‑ 30, 1833)

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 24 Jun 1833:

 

            Reports the drydocking of CONSTITUTION at 0530 this date.  The ship was safely shored and secured by 1300.

 

Roll 184 (July 1 ‑ 31, 1833)

 

From Captain James Barron, Philadelphia Navy Yard, 27 Jul 1833:

 

            Reports the death of Commodore William Bainbridge at 4 PM this date.

 

Roll 185 (August 1 ‑ 31, 1833)

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 12 Aug 1833:

 

            Requests permission to carry old Seaman Richard Gray on the yard's payroll at the pay of a Boy.  He is a former crewman of CONSTITUTION, having been in her for the GUERRIERE fight, and is worthy of consideration.  [Also was present at JAVA fight.]

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 17 Aug 1833:

 

            Notes the presence of Sailing Master [Samuel C.] Hixon, former CONSTITUTION crewmember, in the yard.

 

Roll 186 (September 2 ‑ 30, 1833)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 187 (October 1 – 31, 1833)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 188 (November 1 ‑ 30, 1833)

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 15 Nov 1833:

 

            Refers to a musician, "Ordinary Seaman Raymond," whom he has employed "making small matters [sic] of the Frigate Constitution for the friends of union and of the country, ...for the gratification of men who have performed much for their country, and who certainly deserved such a small compliment for their exalted stations & services..."

 

Roll 189 (December 1 ‑ 30, 1833)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 190 (January 1 ‑ 31, 1834)

 

From Captain John Smith, Sailing Master Samuel C. Hixon, and Carpenter John Southwick, Boston Navy Yard, to Captain Jesse D. Elliott, 11 Jan 1834 [enclosure to Elliott's ltr to SecNav, 11 Jan 1834]:

 

            Reports that "we find the Breast Hook under the Birth [sic] Deck of the Constitution, well fayed & fastened; there are three clamps under the beams of the Birth Deck.‑‑  In faying the Breast Hook to its proper place, it was found necessary to snipe off [sic], at the Apron, about one a half [sic] of said clamps.  this [sic] we are informed, is sometimes done on the lower Decks of Ships or vessels of any class.  The bolts which fastened that part of said clamps that were removed, were of course cut off, but this in our opinion could produce no injury  In [sic] no part of the Birth Deck as complained of, can we perceive defect, no [sic] can we discover any thing wrong about the Counter timbers."

 

From Captain Wolcott Chauncey, Washington, DC, 15 Jan 1834:

 

            Requests consideration as CONSTITUTION's (or BRANDYWINE's) next captain.  Has been left inactive for the past five years despite his regular requests for service.

 

Roll 191 (February 1 ‑ 28, 1834)

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 22 Feb 1834:

 

            "I herewith enclose an anonymous hand bill which seems to have been struck off and distributed in Boston to produce an excitement among the lower classes of society, upon a subject, which above all others I would have considered, above the comments of intelligent partizans [sic].

            "The cause of this hand bill is as follows ‑ shortly after the President of the United States had left Boston, I conversed with the Architect who was to superintend the repairs of the Constitution, about the propriety of putting a Figure on her, for a head; and concluded to do so, as she had been thus ornamented originally.

            "The person who had been in the habit of carving the ornaments for our Vessels of War was therefore sent for and directed to make for a head a figure of the President of the United States, dressed as represented in the Hermitage scene, holding in his hand a scroll having for its motto, "the Constitution must be preserved," taken from the remarks which you had occasion to make on her deck at the time she was received into Dock, under the direction of the Officer who commanded her when she took the Guerriere.

            "I furthermore directed him to carve the bust of Hull, Bainbridge, and Stewart, for her stern ornaments;‑ thus presenting our Chief Magistrate and the 3 successful commanders of that favourite ship, in an attitude which I deemed highly honorable to the Navy, and the Nation.

            "Prompted by my own feelings of respect which had been generated by 3 or 4 years service under the immediate authority of the executive; a portion of which was spent in the discharge of a delicate duty in our own Country, where I could perceive in his instructions to me, the finest feelings of the human heart embodied: and being aware of the high honors conferred upon him during his late tour by the State of Massachusetts and her Literary institution, and more particularly by the Inhabitants of Boston and the neighboring towns ‑ I considered that in putting his figure upon the Stem of the Constitution I should be uniting with them in this demonstration of respect, and doing an act which could not but be acceptable to our whole corps.

            "I therefore at that time ‑ which was at least 6 months ago ‑ gave the order to have it done, and although I have spoken of the fact often to persons without regard to party, I have never heard the fitness of the ornament questioned until this week, nor have I conversed with the person on the subject who is to execute the work, since I gave him the order until this day.‑

            "This morning I have seen him, and he informs me that he has been engaged for some time past in the execution of this work.

            "There is no question but what the hand bill is got out for present political purposes, and that had the figure been made and put on to the Frigate at the time of the Presidents [sic] visit, many of the persons who now express such intemperate opinions, would have been equally zealous in raising it with acclamations to its appropriate place.

            "I had no political motives whatever in placing the figure there, as Politics are not suffered to be the subject of communication or action within this yard.

            "I did not bring the subject to your notice before from feelings of delicacy, as I knew that custom would furnish a precedent for my so doing ‑ as I had been informed and as appears on reference to my own office my predecessors have heretofore ornamented Ships with Figures, Eagles and Billet Heads, at their Option.

            "I regret exceedingly that a General Order of the Department should forbid my bringing this subject to the Pubic: but through you, and must offer truth as my apology for so doing."

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 26 Feb 1834:

 

            "Since my letter to the Department of the 2nd inst in relation to the Ornaments of the Constitution I have been further satisfied that the excitement got up at that time was only for political purpose.

            "The enclosed letter received by me on the evening of the 24th inst will shew [sic] the Department the disposition of the Raisers of the excitement and I imagine if the Figure Head of the Constitution should be changed to please them, there is no telling what they will ask next ‑ as they have now demanded the removal of the Inscription from the Head of the Dry Dock.

            "The excitement has nearly passed away since I have informed those who had the means of making it public that the Figure Head was ordered by myself 6 months ago unbeknownst to the Government but yet fully known to one of the move active movers in the excitement."

 

[Enclosure]

 

                                "North End ‑‑ 24th.

 

"We have made you abandon the Constitution take Jacksons name of [sic] the dock or in 48 ours [sic] you breath [sic] no more ‑

                                Many North

                                Enders

Como Elliott

    Navy Yard‑"

 

Roll 192 (March 1 ‑ 31, 1834)

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 1 Mar 1834:

 

            "I herewith enclose a copy of a letter which I have this day sent to the Navy Commissioners in answer to one from them of the 24th ulto directing a Billet Head and other plain ornaments to be put on the Bow a [sic] Stern of the Constitution.

            "As it is uncommon, as far as I can learn, for the Board to say what ornaments shall be placed upon the public Vessels repaired or Built at the different Naval Establishments I have deemed it proper to bring the subject to your notice more particularly as I have referred them to my letter to you of the 22nd ulto."

 

[Enclosed copy]

 

From Captain Elliott to Captain John Rodgers, BNC, 1 Mar 1834:

 

            "I have received the Commissioners letter of the 24th ultimo and have to remark in answer to that part which refers to the ornaments of the bow and Stern of the Frigate Constitution that some six months since after a conversation with the naval architect I concluded upon different ornaments embracing the Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy and the three victor captains.

            "The former has so far progressed as nearly to be completed and will be a remarkable [sic] strong resemblance to the original.

            "Should it ‑ under these circumstances together with the excitement which has been so unnecessarily gotten up for an apparent political effect ‑ be the wish of the Board that the ornaments should be changed I must await their further instructions and offer as my apology that on an examination of the papers on file in my office I could find nothing which had offered as a guide to my predecessors but what left the ornamenting of public vessels built or repaired at t his yard entirely to their discretion."

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 31 Mar 1834:

 

            "As the operations of this yard have of late been subjected to the criticism and unnecessary attention of a few of the citizens of Boston and its environs, and as several of my official acts have been misrepresented through the Public prints, I have deemed it my duty to give the Department a statement of facts relating to the subject, that should any call be made upon it for Documents, it may be enabled to comply with it by answering the whole subject at once.

            "Having understood from the Artist who was to carve the Figure Head for the Constitution, and from hand bills extensively distributed outside that threats had been made against its completion or removal, and wishing to prevent the people of Boston from being eternally disgraced by a few heated political partizans [sic] by a midnight movement, I determined to remove the head to the Yard in the usual manner,‑ that is by boxing it up, and bringing it from Boston in the Launch.

            "I accordingly on the 21st inst directed Sailing Master Hixon upon whose discretion I could rely, with a Boats [sic] crew composed of the Seamen and Ordinary Seamen of the Yard, to proceed to Boston and receive the Head‑  I also ordered him not to take any arms with him nor to let any of his party.

            "The Officer executed his duty at 9 oclock [sic] in the morning, and the whole affair was conducted to my entire satisfaction‑

            "In the evening of the same day, having been informed by Anonymous hand bills and by the report of conversations outside, that an attempt would be made to take the Head from the Yard; I sent for Master Commandant Percival and directed him confidentially, to receive on board the Columbus certain cutlasses and Boarding pikes that would be sent down to him by Captain Smith, so that in case of any necessity they could be used by the Seamen and Ordinary Seamen of the Yard: but of this necessity I stated both to him and Captain Smith confidentially, I had no expectation of its occurring, but still deemed it my duty to take this precautionary measure.

             "Capt Percival received this order without raising a question against complying with it, and went on board as I concluded, to make necessary preparations for having it executed.

            "Capt Smith the Executive Officer of the yard was then ordered to send the arms on board, this he did by giving instructions to the Gunner to go with them‑

            "Upon the Gunners [sic] going on board the ship, Capt Percival sent for him and refused to receive them without a written order from Captain Smith,‑  The Gunner then went for Captain Smith, but not finding him returned and took the arms away[.]

            "The Gunner then reported the same to me when I sent for Captain Percival and demanded an explanation‑ this he refused to give in any other manner than by saying 'he would receive no orders from a Gunner'‑

            "I told him that it was my order and he knew it previously, he again replied he would receive no order from a Gunner or any officer of a Navy Yard[.]  I then suspended him from duty and placed the direction of the ship in the hands of Lt [Frederick] Varnum [ed: First Lieutenant of COLUMBUS], who received the arms and executed the order with promptness.

            "The next day Capt Smith came to me and said that Capt Percival was wrong, and would probably make an explanation that would be satisfactory.

            "Captain Percival did so as per copy marked A, and I  restored him to duty as per copy marked B.‑

            "This Sir is the true statement of the case and I should not have deemed it necessary to bring it to the notice of the Department, were it not for the attempt that has been made to produce a wrong impression upon the Public mind, without a proper disposition to correct it."

 

Roll 193 (April 1 ‑ 30, 1834)

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 4 Apr 1834:

 

            Forwards transfer request of Master Commandant John Percival with his own request to make it so.

 

Roll 194 (May 1 ‑ 31, 1834)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 195 (June 1 ‑ 30, 1834)

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 19 Jun 1834:

 

            Forwards a model of CONSTITUTION as requested "during your visit to this establishment in July last."

 

Roll 196 (July 1 ‑ 31, 1835)

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 2 Jul 1834:

 

            Reports that they "can commence upon the Constitution immediately" after completing POTOMAC on 1 Sep.  Expects that it will take "an exceeding short time" to fit CONSTITUTION for sea.

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 3 Jul 1834:

 

            "I herewith enclose a communication from Lt. Commandant James Armstrong, of the Receiving Ship Columbus, relating to an outrage committed upon the Frigate Constitution, a Vessel of War of the United States, while moored between the 74s Columbus and Independence at this yard, by some person, or persons, unknown.         

            "This insult to the Government appears to have been long premeditated, and while the Head was in the possession of the Carver in Boston, a bribe was offered to him, by three persons, of high standing in the city, provided he would let them carry it off and insult it, without molestation.‑  this [sic] bribe was rejected by the Carver, who gave me information which induced me to  have it removed to, and finished at, this yard; as I informed the Department on the 31st of March last.‑

            "Some one however, last night, in spite of the Sentinels and the Watch on board the Columbus, found means to carry their project into execution during a severe storm of wind and rain.

            "Suspicion rested at first upon the marines on post, and the Ship keeper, but it seems to me at present, more than probable that some person from outside the yard, concealed himself on board the ship during the day, and at night, when the storm raged at its highest, accomplished his work and made his escape.  I come to this conclusion, as the lower gate of this yard which is for the use of the Officers was found opened in the morning, although fastened at 10 oclock, last night.

            "A few days doubtless will enable me to obtain further information as to the planners and executors of this midnight outrage.‑

            "Immediately upon learning the fact, this morning, I sent for the Carver of the Head and demanded the names of the individuals who offered him the bribe previous to its removal from his charge, these he declined giving to me until compelled to do so, in due course of law, as he said, he was under a charge of secrecy.

            "From this, and other circumstances I am satisfied, that the head was removed by some person who was acting under the influence of a bribe.‑

            "But a small part of the Head however was mutilated, and that part will be replaced immediately.

          "Understanding from the public print that there has been a change in  the Head of the Department, I would respectfully call your attention to my letters of the 22nd Febry and March 31st now on file in your office [for] a correct statement of my transactions in regard to this ornament, from its commencement to its removal to this yard.

            "I am sorry to say that I perceive a hostile feeling existing against the continuance of this ornament, in the highest circles of those opposed to the administration.

            "I make this communication that the Department may give me such instructions with regard to taking legal steps on the subject, as it may deem proper."

 

[Enclosure]

                            "U. S. Receiving Ship, Columbus

                            Boston July 3rd 1834

 

"Sir

            A Few minutes past, four oclock this morning I was called and informed by Lieut [Peter] Turner the officer of the deck that the Head of the Figure on the Bows of the Frigate Constitution was gone,‑ on examination It appears to have been sawed off by some person or persons from under the Bowsprit in the Head as there is a space of two  feet or less where a man could stretch himself at full length and operate with a hand saw[.]  It was taken off at the junction of the nose and upper lip.  A centinel [sic] was placed on Board that ship at my request for some time past during the night for the safety of recruits committed to any charge to Keep off all Boats &c a ship Keeper or the lookout during the day.  I cannot readily conceive How the mutilation of the Figure could have been affected without the Knowledge of the soldier on post‑  The ship Keeper left the centinel [sic] after ten oclock last night at his post in the Bows of the ship, and remarked to him that he slept on the Larboard side of the gun deck near the Bridle port ‑ that if he heard any suspicious noise to stamp on the deck and he would be up immediately.  The night was extremely dark with uncommonly heavy rain with an occasional gust of wind &c &c.

                            I am Sir

                            very respectfully

Como                           your obt Svt

 J D Elliott               Jas Armstrong

 U. S. Navy                Lieut. commanding"

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 4 Jul 1834:

 

            "I find the clerk of the yard Samuel Etheridge to be strongly opposed to the Government.

            "He has lately made bets that the Figure Head of the Constitution would be mutilated and now exults that it has been thus treated.

            "He has also stated that he would make it a point to see the Secretary of the Navy whenever he should be in be same town with him and insult him, for he believed him to be a great Blackguard and a mean dirty fellow (meaning Mr. Woodbury).

            "As he is an officer of appointment by the Commandant, with the consent of the Secretary of the Navy, I cannot remove him without your authority.

            "I therefore request that such authority may be given me and that I may be authorized to appoint a clerk of the yard in his place."

 

From Captain Charles W. Morgan, Boston, MA, 4 Jul 1834:

 

            Reapplies for command of CONSTITUTION due the change in SecNav.  He had applied earlier, in Apr, while at Washington.

 

Roll 197 (August 1 ‑ 30, 1834)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 198 (September 1 ‑ 30, 1834)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 199 (October 1 ‑ 31, 1834)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 200 (November 1 ‑ 30, 1834)

 

            NOTHING

 

Roll 201 (December 1 ‑ 31, 1834)

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 7 Dec 1834:

 

            Advises that, in view of the precarious diplomatic relation with France and the inevitable delays New England winter weather cause in the outfitting of ships, he has done a "preparatory fitment of the Constitution and her rigging...is now in a state of forwardness."

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 20 Dec 1834:

 

            Reports having received instructions to fit CONSTITUTION for sea.

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 27 Dec 1834:

 

            Requests order to CONSTITUTION for Lieutenant J. H. Ward of Connecticut, Midshipman George Terry Sinclair of Virginia, and Passed Midshipman Stedman [sic: Charles Steedman] of South Carolina.  [Sinclair and Steedman were so ordered.]

 

Roll 202 (January 1 ‑ 31, 1835)

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 5 Jan 1835:

 

            Reports that the severe winter has resulted in the harbor icing over "as far down as Fort Independence," and this may cause a delay in CONSTITUTION's sailing at the time expected.

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 19 Jan 1835:

 

            Requests that Gunner Thomas Ryley and Boatswain William Hart be ordered to CONSTITUTION, as well as Acting Carpenter James Miskelly. [Ed: Ryley was so ordered.]

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 22 Jan  1835:

 

"Official but confidential...

 

            "This day I was called upon by the Artist Mr Laban S Beecher who executed the Ornaments for the Frigate Constitution who prefaced his remarks by stating that he had been called upon by Captain Benjamin Rich and others the former an East India Merchant of Boston doubtless the same East India Merchant to whom reference was made in my letter to the Department of the 5th of July apprizing it of the mutiliation of the Figure Head of the Constitution who prefaced his remarks with the statement that he Mr Beecher was authorized to call and see me and say that any Figure which I might name save that of General Jackson would be made and placed upon the Ship without expense to the Government‑‑ to which I replied that the Figure had been mutilated in the most barbarous and wanton manner that the object for which it had been taken away by them had I supposed been accomplished and that the mutilated portion could only be received to which he replied that he believed it was all cut up‑‑  I farther [sic] stated that I had no control over the subject which belonged to the Government and that I would not repair this or allow another image to be placed there without its authority.

            "He then stated that they remarked that the Ship would not be allowed to go to Sea with even the remaining part of the image on her bows even if they were compelled to resort to placing Guns at the narrows to prevent her passage out[.]  I replied that they had better think well of that subject and desired the conversation to cease as I wished to have none on this subject.  the [sic] Artist Mr Beecher then took his leave.

            "I have however deemed it my duty to give such orders to redouble our vigilance without ostentation so that 500 men could not injure the ship further than they have done.

            "Since your departure from this place with a determination not to repair the Figure I have had a marine sentinel with an Officer by his side constantly at night to defend it[.]

            "I believe I have not brought to your notice the fact that a second attempt was made to carry off a larger portion of the figure on the night of the 5th of July but which proved abortive as they were discovered, I believe one of the Actors was drowned in attempting to escape while the other succeeded in passing the wall;  the Boat however in which the attempt was made was captured and is now at this yard.

 

"P.S.  I understand these people perfectly well you need therefore feel under no apprehension[.]  From the present appearance of the Weather I think I shall have the Ship ready for her Officers & men by the 15th of next month‑‑  I shall deem it my duty if necessary to see the Ship  outside the narrows when she departs the Port."

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 26 Jan 1835:

 

            Reports CONSTITUTION will be ready for officers and men "in 10 Days."

 

Roll 203 (February 1 ‑ 28, 1835)

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 9 Feb 1835:

 

            Reports CONSTITUTION ready to receive crew.

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 24 Feb 1835:

 

            Reports that "tomorrow" he will embark in CONSTITUTION 132 seamen, 50 ordinary seamen, 53 landsmen, 26 boys, and "the Marine Guard fom New York."  This is 18 seamen and 67 ordinary seamen short of complement.  Lieutenants Ellery, Pearson, and Neville, Sailing Master Ferguson, Purser Etting, Chaplain Everett, 3 midshipmen, the gunner, and the carpenter have reported for duty.  Five months worth of provisions have been stowed; the rest are to be delivered at New York by 10 March.  Expects to be at sea "in 6 Days."

            "I have 14 Rounds of Ammunition [per gun] now filled and on board the Ship and as naval Actions are determined in a very short time I expect I shall have powder sufficient to meet any contingency which might occur...

            "I have caused a plan of the part taken from the Figure Head to be sent to the Artist whom you named at New York who will I trust be enabled to have the same got out so as to be ready to be placed upon the Figure shortly after my arrival...

            "...the Constitution cannot I think be other than the fastest sailer in the Navy."

 

From Captain Jessse D. Elliott, Boston Navy Yard, 25 Feb 1835:

 

            Forwards report of ship's inspection board. 

            "I agree with them perfectly in their opinion of the Channels and lest you might think that I had been instrumental in placing them there, I herewith enclose the copies of letters which have passed between the Commissioners and myself in relation to the same.

            "Upon my expressing my opinion, to the Surveying Officers, of the channels after they had finished, they politely furnished me with a copy of their letter to the Board which will undoubtedly be laid before you.

            "Feeling however desirous to have the whole matter settled at once, I have forwarded the copy as stated above and upon my arrival at New York shall be enabled to report fully upon the chains & channels."

 

[Enclosures]

 

Ltr from Elliott to Captain John Rodgers, BNC, 26 Mar 1834:

 

            "Herewith you will find a box containing [word omitted; possibly "models"] of the Gun Deck & ports of a Frigate with the chains.

            "The one made in the usual manner (the Board will perceive by placing the wooden gun upon the pivot in the center of the port) will prevent the gun raking fore and aft almost two points more than the other channel, which is bent to an inverted arc.

            "My attention has been brought to this subject by the conviction that the Guns have not a sufficient rake, owing to the obstruction of the chains formed in the usual manner.

            "As I wish to give the officer commanding that Ship every possible means of defending her, I would suggest that the chains for the Constitution, on each side of the ports where they interfere, should be formed & fitted in the new manner now presented to the Board."

 

Ltr from Captain John Rodgers, BNC, to Elliott, 21 Apr 1834:

 

            "The caulking & first coat of paint may be put on the Constitution as it will not interfere with any disposition of the channels which the Board may eventually direct."

 

Ltr from Captain Isaac Chauncey, BNC, to Elliott, 28 May 1834:

 

            "The Constitution need not be detained in dock on account of her chains and channels for which the Board will give instruction in due season.

 

Ltr from Elliott to Captain John Rodgers, BNC, 30 Aug 1834:

 

            Reports his Naval Constructor is at a loss as to how to attach the channels in the new position on CONSTITUTION; requests instructions.

 

Ltr from Captain Charles Morris, BNC, to Elliott, 3 Sep 1834:

 

            "You will be pleased to direct the underside of the Channels of the Frigate Constitution to be placed on the lower part of the second strake above the spar deck port  cill [sic] (as pointed out by the Commissioners when they were at the Navy Yard) so far from the seam only as will allow for caulking‑ this will bring the under part of the channels about 16 or 17 inches above the Spar deck.

            "The chain bolts are to be driven in the strake next above the top of the gun deck ports, abut one third of the width of the strake from its lower edge.  The preventer bolts are to go through the strake of spirketing next above the gun deck water ways."

 

Ltr from Captain John Rodgers, BNC, to Elliott, 31 Oct 1834:

 

            "Before the Board gave the instructions to raise the Channels of the frigate Constitution they consulted ship Builders & had the experience afforded by the Frigate Hudson.  They are unable to perceive how the use of the spar deck guns can be more injured or impeded by raising the Channels than they would have been with them placed as usual, if they & the dead eyes have been placed as directed, nor are they able to comprehend what danger can be reasonably apprehended to to [sic] persons stationed on the spar deck from the concussion of her main deck guns, or that their exertions will be thus destroyed in action, or that the spar deck guns will be rendered useless ‑ under these expressions & the circumstances of case, the Board do not deem it expedient to order a Board of Naval Officers & architects to examine & report on a subject upon which they have deliberately decided."

 

Ltr from Elliott to Captain John Rodgers, BNC, 8 Nov 1834:

 

            "I have received the Commssrs letter of the 31st ult.  The one to which it is an answer was written after finding an universal condemnation [sic] of the arrangements of the Channels of the Constitution by every Officer of rank who had visited the Yard & had seen them, including Com. Creighton, who commanded the Hudson on her cruise to the Brazils.  The Constructor of this Yard & other architects not belonging to the service had observed them, coincided in opinion & believed the Ship would be much weakened by the arrangement.

            "The particular effects to which I alluded would arise from the Channels being shortened to fit between each port & thus allow the concussion to ascend & descend when as previously arranged each gun on the gun & spar deck having the projecting channels were secure from the effects of concussion, now it is the reverse; when the carronades are depressed, the intervening dead eye prevents training more than 1/2 a point.  The channels are arranged exactly in conformity to the Commissioners instructions of the 4th Sept last.

            "The subject has been brought to the notice of the Board in a conscientious discharge of my duty as Comdt of this yard, of course the subject rests here, trusting that the arrangements as made by the instructions may be satisfactory in the end that the matter might be finally settled, as the standing rigging for the present arrangement will be considerably shorter than if the channels were lower down & if changed would then be too short, & as the Contractor is called upon to let the yarns lay three months in Tar, no time was to be lost."

 

Ltr from Elliott to Captain John Rodgers, BNC, 14 Feb 1835:

 

        "The chain pumps for the Constitution are now fitted & work to my entire satisfaction.  I wish however I could say as much in praise of the chains & channels of the Ship but the accompanying plates will convince the Board of the insecurity of trusting to them or to the bolts when fitted in that manner upon setting up the rigging the Shrouds drew the bolts into the wood & twisted & fractured the plates as you will perceive.  to [sic] obviate this difficulty I caused the plates to be made stouter & a little larger, but still there seems to be danger of their giving away to extraordinary strains.

        "I shall however proceed to New York in her in a short time & during my passage shall pay particular attention ot them & if necessary make a more full report to the Board from hence.

        "Should the Board conclude to continue this mode in other Ships, I should recommend that the channels should be placed lower down & thus take the dead eyes altogether from the range of the Gun when placed at its lowest depression & that a permanent iron fixture be placed within to give greater security to the bolts that hold the chains."

 

Ltr from Captains J. Downes and T. H. Stevens to Captain John Rodgers, BNC, 25 Feb 1835:

 

            "In compliance with the order of the Honble Secretary of the Navy, we have examined into the repairs & equipment of the Constitution & the state & fitness of that Vessel for service at sea & of the manner & fidelity with which the repairs &c have been executed, & have to report to the Board of Navy Commissioners that her repairs, so far as we can judge from appearances not having seen her during the time her repairs were being made have been thorough & made with perfect fidelity.  Her equipment is certainly of the very first order ‑ indeed we may say she is fitted in every respect in very superior style‑  We feel however constrained to remark that in our opinion, the security of the masts is considerably impaired in consequence of the raising of her Channels from their original position, to where they now are[.]  The dead eyes & lanyards of the lower rigging also, interfered more with the training of the spar deck guns, in consequence of raising the channels.  In every other respect the ship is in our opinion fully prepared for service at sea."

 

Roll 204 (March 1 ‑ 31, 1835)

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, USS CONSTITUTION, 2 Mar 1835:

 

            Reports underway in CONSTITUTION from Boston for New York.

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, USS CONSTITUTION, 6 Mar 1835:

 

            Reports his arrival in CONSTITUTION off Sandy Hook.

            "During a part of the passage the weather was exceedingly boisterous thereby affording me an opportunity of testing the properties of this Ship[.]

            "It will be recollected that at the time she was launched in 1797 she hung on the ways in consequence of which she became hogged to a considerable extent say 2 1/2 feet.  When recently docked at the Navy Yard at Boston particular attention was paid by me to remedy this defect by means of chocks &c and the Ship is now restored to her original architectural form with all the properties appertaining to her superior model; and I now unhesitatingly say that there is not a more weatherly fine and faster ship in the service n fact the Constitution almost beats herself[.]  I beg leave to state that whatever articles belonging to her equipment which were not received at Boston I have ordered to be forwarded to New York[.]  I found it necessary to call into requisition the services of Surgeon Doyers[.]  On the Surgeons joining the Constitution I shall order him to resume his previous duty at the Yard at Boston..."

            Purser Etting also will join at New York.  Expects to be towed up to the city by a steamboat at 10 AM tomorrow through "a great deal of drifting ice."

            "You may not be aware of the fact that there existed in Boston an inquisitional disposition as to the repairing of the mutilation of the Figure Head one supposing it had been repaired there and the other that it would be in New York this disposition however I have taken no steps to gratify.

            "Having placed a covering of Canvas upon it soon after its mutilation I have not had it exposed but previous to leaving Boston I had it enveloped in the American Flag and left the Port in that appropriate manner."

 

From Captain Charles G. Ridgely, New York NY, 9 Mar 1835:

 

            Reports that CONSTITUTION arrived at the bar on the 5th, and requested a tow to the city.  But his request was not received until 10 PM on the 7th, long after a gale arising on the morning of the 6th had forced the frigate out to sea.  As it is snowing heavily now, it is presumed she will remain offshore until the weather clears.

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, USS CONSTITUTION, 11 Mar 1835:

 

            "Knowing the wishes of the Government, and being well aware of your previous communications of my destination, I assumed command of the Constitution previous to the reception of my regular appointment to her, calculating to be in New York in a short time where I could receive it."

            A gale on the 6th forced him offshore after losing his bower anchor and 15 fathoms of chain cable.  Made the Hook again on the 8th, crossed the bar on the 9th, and with the aid of a steam boat came to the city this morning, exchanging 13 gun salutes with the French brig of war D'Apas.  Commodore Ridgely has provided a replacement anchor and chain.

             "If in leaving Boston, I have given offence by displaying the American Ensign upon the Figure Head of the president, the same disposition does not seem to exist here, for upon my entering this port the different vessels bound out paid salutes by lowering their Flags as they passed..."

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, USS CONSTITUTION, 13 Mar 1835:

 

            Has received dispatches from the State Department and expects to sail "on Sunday morning."  Any officers who haven't reported will be left behind.

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, USS CONSTITUTION, 15 Mar 1835:

 

            Reports having cleared the bar aided by two steam boats.  Says the replacement head on the figurehead is "even truer" than the Boston original.

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, USS CONSTITUTION, 15 Mar 1835 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Expresses gratitude that he has been allowed to take his son out "as a boy to do a midshipmans [sic] duty."

 

From Captain John W. Downes, Boston Navy Yard, 16 Mar 1835:

 

            Reports that William Wheeler, alias William A. Meade, was transferred from COLUMBUS to CONSTITUTION prior to her sailing.

 

 From Captain Charles G. Ridgely, New York Navy Yard, 16 Mar 1835:

 

            Reports the figurehead repairs were completed "on Saturday last" at 2 PM and the ship sailed at Sunday's dawn.  She had arrived "wanting almost everything" and all was given her, including 126 seamen, ordinary seamen, and boys.

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, USS CONSTITUTION, 16 Mar 1835:

 

            Reports the presence of Assistant Surgeon [Robert] Woodworth.  Now underway for "Havre."

 

From Captain Charles G. Ridgely, New York Navy Yard, 20 Mar 1835:

 

             Provided CONSTITUTION, among other things, with a boat, a mizzen royal yard, a set of sliding gunter royal masts with hoops for the topgallant mastheads, a ringtail boom, 1 22" hemp cable of 120 fathoms, 1 7" hawser, 2 9" hawsers, 1 10" hawser, 100 fathoms 8" rope for stoppers, 1 2" chain cable of 150 fathoms and 4 stoppers, 250' of cable platt, a 6720 lb anchor, and iron work for billboards.  Also, 2 charts each for the English Channel, the North Atlantic, the North Sea, and the north coast of France and the bay of Biscay (with sailing directions), a sextant, a quadrant, 3 spy glasses, 1 night glass, and 2 Nautical Almanacs for 1836 and 1837.  Plus hide rope tyes for the topsail yards, hide rope truss pendants, 150 fathoms 3" rope, and a rope making machine, as well as a brass magazine lock and 2 brass padlocks.  Among provisions, CONSTITUTION received 2302 lbs of cheese, 836 of butter, 79,853 of bread 858 1/2 gallons of whiskey, and 20 barrels of flour.  The Gunner took aboard 12,812 lbs of cannon powder, 2000 lbs of priming powder, 3 drum head, 160 fathoms of 2 1/2" rope for muzzle lashings, 96 cutlasses, 1 pair of ball moulds "for 7 barrel pieces," and a port fire mould.  Her Carpenter received 6 patent lights (6 1/2" x 3 1/2"), 2 lignum vitae rollers, 2 cherry boards, 2 paint knives, 2 putty knives, a quantity of copper boat rivets, 2 lbs of London white lead, 2 of Ivory black, 1/2 of best vermilion, 2 of stone yellow, 1/4 of India red, 1/4 of Prussian blue pigments, as well as 2 dozen camel hair paint brushes, a dozen Lyons (portrait) brushes, a pallet knife, a quart of copal varnish, 100' of oak board, 2 ash ladders "for the passage hatch," 220 lbs of 20d nails, and 110 lbs of 30d nails.  The Sailmaker received 150 fathoms of 1" bolt rope, 220 fathoms of 2", 200 fathoms of 3", and 150 of 4", and 200 yds of old canvas. And "one patent water closet" for $24.75.

 

Roll 205 (April 1 ‑ 30, 1835)

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, USS CONSTITUTION, 10 Apr 1835:

 
           
Reports his arrival at Le Havre.  Because CONSTITUTION had been rigged in freezing weather, he chose to begin the crossing by skirting the north side of the Gulf Stream until he got to 46‑37N, 39‑12W where he encountered numerous ice fields and ice bergs, the thermometer holding at around 34 degrees.

            "...Were it not for the unfortunate alterations made by the Order of the Navy Board, in the Channels, which cause her upper Works to work, I should say, that the Constitution was, as the President directed "preserved," and is now more than herself.  You will perceive that she is very superior in sailing; but I am compelled to say, that she has all the peculiarities of a fast Ship.  She is as fleet and as wet as a Dolphin..."

            Is happy with his officers except for the Purser.

            "On the 18th of March, I had to regret the loss of a Seaman...named William Emerson.  His real name...was Wm Shaw ‑ resided in Washington, DC...  He fell from the main yard into the water...and was doomed to a watery grave.  On the 2nd inst I lost a Marine by the name of [?] Danson of New York City."  Died of consumption.  "Yesterday a seaman by the name of Thompson died on board..." due to dissipation.  Also lost a 2426 lb "shifting gun" at night in a storm while making perhaps 13 knots.

 

Roll 206 (May 1 ‑ 31, 1835)

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, USS CONSTITUTION, 15 May 1835:

 

            When winds prevented entering Le Havre on 23 Apr, and his intended call at Cowes, Elliott took the ship to Cherbourg [on 24 Apr?].  Departed Cherbourg on 1 May and arrived at Le Havre the next day, where Mr. Livingston and family awaited him.  To sea again on 3 May under adverse conditions.  Anchored at Plymouth on the 10th.  Now underway and hoping for a quick passage.

 

Roll 207 (June 1 ‑ 30, 1835)

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, USS CONSTITUTION, 22 Jun 1835:

 

            Reports CONSTITUTION has crossed the Atlantic in 35 days.

            "...It however becomes my duty again to call your attention to the want of stability in her channels, which have well risked not only her loss to the nation, but the lives of all on board, constantly against strong winds in the British Channel, to get out of which and [obscured] Scilly Isles I was called upon to put her under a heavy press of canvas: and when just to windward & passing, the chains forward began [obscured], and had a second one have given way, the Foremast most [obscured] by the board, the Ship & all hands with it."  Every naval architect and officer who visited the ship in France and England condemned her channels.

            Suggests that five ought to be the maximum number of lieutenants in a frigate.  Mentions his "efficient & indefatigable" First Lieutenant, [John B.] Montgomery.  Claims there is nothing but harmony among all in the ship.  Has given Midshipman [Frederick] Oakes shore leave to seek recovery from a severe pulmonary complaint.  Reports that Carpenter J. A. Dickason has a bad hernia and requests his replacement.

 

From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, USS CONSTITUTION, 23 Jun 1835:

 

            Mr. Livingston landed this morning, saluted with 17 guns, with yards manned and the ship decorated with "numerical flags."

 

 From Captain Jesse D. Elliott, USS CONSTITUTION, 23 Jun 1835 [2nd ltr]:

 

            Mentions Surgeon Thomas J. Boyd and Assistant Surgeon Brinckerhoff, both of the ship.